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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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8 replies to this topic

#1 heartless

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:23 AM

Seeing GD's 'new' old lathe & the discussion that started about old tools in general - have decided to start a thread devoted to the "oldies, but goodies"

We recently "inherited" a whole bunch of tools from madkow's dad (not really inherited as his dad is still with us, but...) His dad was a maintenance tech for many, many years at a Buick dealership, so the tools are MANY!! and most are older vintages - some no longer made.
The greater majority are hand tools - wrenches, ratchets, sockets & drivers, some diagnostic tools and a few home-owner type things.

Names like Snap-on, Mac, Craftsman & one i ad never heard of before getting these - Bonney

I will get the pictur show started with this old beauty - a vintage Craftsman circular saw with a storage box & paperwork!

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#2 lostinthe202

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 10:12 AM

Neat thread!

I may be jumping the gun a tad as I'm not yet sure if I get to take this home. But it looks reasonably sure so I'll post it anyway. Besides, it's too cool not to:banana:

Atlas 7" shaper, dates to the 60's or so.

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59' Ford Jubilee.... and a 2008 dog....

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1934 (or so) Sheldon 10" lathe. This model was used extensively by the military in mobile machine shops, big box trucks with a machine shop in back. I don't have a current pic, but this is a pic from when I bought it.

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Pair of dividers from the 1800's (gifted to me by a friend)

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Edited by lostinthe202, 23 December 2009 - 10:19 AM.
add pic


#3 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 12:17 PM

Oh boy. I guess I have pictures to take then.

That's a nice circular saw - my dad has one similar to it - heavy machine built for real construction unlike the plastic of today. A real contractor will tell you that the weight is an advantage to a point as it pulls the saw through the work if you know how to use the weight.

GD

#4 heartless

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 06:28 PM

cool! we are off to a good start!

I have some pics i need to take as well! nothing as cool as the lathes & shaper, but some neet old stuff - mostly mechanics hand tools. :)

Like a Bonney 3/4 drive set - ratchet, breaker bar, 2 extensions & a bunch of sockets. Also have a very unique torque wrench made by Bonney.

The Bonney name disappeared in the late 60's, very early 70's...they were held in high regard back in the day - similar to Snap On in quality and craftsmanship.

have a pic of the 3/4 drive set (minus the sockets) and a little teaser on the torque wrench...

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#5 coxy

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 06:10 PM

Yeah someone else who owns some Bonney gear,mine are a full set of AN wrenches for Aircraft hydraulic fittings,definately something about older gear and quality.
Not just the older gear you buy but because the labour rates were lower back then tradesmen took their time to do the job right just for the satisfaction of that alone and that is why older generally means better build quality.

#6 lostinthe202

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 09:04 PM

Oh boy. I guess I have pictures to take then.

GD


You holding out on us or what? Where's them pics!!??

#7 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 02:00 AM

I know - I need to get on it. Dang these "responsibilities" anyway :rolleyes:

Never enough time in the day.

GD

#8 heartless

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 08:03 AM

I know - I need to get on it. Dang these "responsibilities" anyway :rolleyes:

Never enough time in the day.

GD


Dont feel too bad GD, have had "Stuff" going on here too...between health issues & computer issues and just trying to take care of day to day stuff...:-\

#9 robm

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 01:42 PM

Old Craftsman sockets are awesome, and so common. A buddy and I once spent hours on a Sunday looking for a deep, thin-wall, 12 point socket to pull apart an automatic transmission. His new (1980's vintage) Craftsman socket was too thick-walled. His girlfriends' father's stuff was 6 point Snap-on (heavy duty mechanic). My Dad's 12 point Snap-on from his WW2 aircraft mechanic days was too shallow. We finally found someone with a 50's or 60's vintage Craftsman 1/2" drive 12 point that worked perfectly. The walls were half the thickness of the 80's stuff.

I also have a 5/16" Black and Decker drill. It takes 20 seconds to come up to speed ( 2500 RPM) but then it has enough torque to put a huge spade bit through 50 year old Doug Fir without slowing, and break your wrist as it comes through. I tried using it as a screwdriver, and there is so much momentum, it will bury the screw an inch deep on the overrun. I figure it dates from the 40's?




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