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Cleaning Tools


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17 replies to this topic

#1 The Dude Abides

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 08:36 PM

3 years agoi did the power steering pump on a 92 dodge caravan. My tools have never been the same since. I was wondering what you guys use to clean up your tools after useing them. Soak them in gas, just wipe them off. Whatever, im curious. I got some new tools for x mas but its time to clean up the ones i have and organize my toolbox tools and my junkyard -portable fix cars tool blx.

#2 lostinthe202

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 10:05 PM

My two cents,

Depends on what kind of tool you're talking about. For anything non-ratcheting I clean it up with anything handy; brake cleaner, carb cleaner, agent orange, alcohol, just a rag. If it's ratcheting, basically the same thing I just make sure to keep it away from the ratcheting portion.

Anything that cuts through the grease will do. I've still got the same Craftsman 3/8's drive socket set from 1990, my first one. What's the secret you ask? Using 1/2" to break it of course!

#3 Jerry DeMoss

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 12:30 AM

To clean tools at home I use either a combination of the gojo pumice hand cleaner and old tooth brush or carb or brake clean on wrenches ect. Then douse them quick with really hot water and wipe them dry with a cloth or blow them off with the air nozzle.

#4 Qman

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 12:38 AM

The easiest thing I have found in the 30+ yrs of wrenching to keep my tools clean is to clean them(wipe down with a shop rag) and put them away immediately after using them. No secret sauces or cleaners required. Rachets will from time to time to be disassembled and new grease added. But other than that, just clean up when you're done is the best advice I could give any young mechanic.

#5 lostinthe202

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 06:58 AM

The easiest thing I have found in the 30+ yrs of wrenching to keep my tools clean is to clean them(wipe down with a shop rag) and put them away immediately after using them. No secret sauces or cleaners required. Rachets will from time to time to be disassembled and new grease added. But other than that, just clean up when you're done is the best advice I could give any young mechanic.


Well yes, in most situations this works fine. But when one accidentally drops a wrench into the oil catch pan or coats it in brake fluid because the drain hose got nudged, a little extra help is nice to get the skin off.

Also, though all us backyard mechanics get tired of walking back and forth to the garage every few minutes to exchange a wrench, you are right in that putting your tools away immediately after use helps you not only keep them clean but not loose them!

#6 Scoobywagon

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 08:38 AM

In my shop, the guys use the Handi-Wipes we keep around for general cleaning and then Sprayway glass cleaner to get the residue from the Handi-Wipes. They're not Handi-Wipes brand. We get them from PGW. They're a light cloth with some skin-friendly solvents and something that is ever so slightly gritty. Its good stuff because it'll clean up pretty much whatever you need to clean, but won't scratch the customer's paint. That's important when you go to set a windshield and track urethane on the paint.

#7 Legacy777

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 11:19 AM

I am pretty anal retentive about clean tools.....and what I will typically do, depending on the level of gunk on them, is clean them with brake cleaner first, and then do a final wipe down with a glass/all surface cleaner.

As I mentioned, I probably go way beyond what "normal" people do, but that's me. I hate picking up a slimey grease tool that wasn't cleaned from the time before. Only exception is when I've got a several day project going on, I may not clean the tools.

Brake cleaner is probably going to work the best for you to remove the power steering fluid.

#8 bheinen74

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 12:40 PM

The easiest thing I have found in the 30+ yrs of wrenching to keep my tools clean is to clean them(wipe down with a shop rag) and put them away immediately after using them. No secret sauces or cleaners required. Rachets will from time to time to be disassembled and new grease added. But other than that, just clean up when you're done is the best advice I could give any young mechanic.


This.just a plain old used shop rag. No chemicals, no pricey cleaners. Just a halfway dry oily shop rag.

#9 The Dude Abides

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 01:57 PM

Heres the thing, i have the week off of work and ive decided to organize my tools so ill be bringing everything into the house to do this. Probally in the kitchen. They dotn need to be super clean just all the grease off them would be nice. I think ill leave the other tools alone just organize the sockets and wrenches.

#10 Qman

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 02:18 PM

This.just a plain old used shop rag. No chemicals, no pricey cleaners. Just a halfway dry oily shop rag.


Exactly, a little oil is actually good. Otherwise, they will or can rust.

#11 soobenthusiast

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 03:44 PM

I agree, a slightly oily rag, or even better is one with a little bit of gas on it, always seems to work well for cleaning my tools.

#12 NV Zeno

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 04:23 PM

The easiest thing I have found in the 30+ yrs of wrenching to keep my tools clean is to clean them(wipe down with a shop rag) and put them away immediately after using them. No secret sauces or cleaners required. Rachets will from time to time to be disassembled and new grease added. But other than that, just clean up when you're done is the best advice I could give any young mechanic.


+1.

In my many years of owning and using tools, I can't recall ever using a chemical or solvent to clean any of them..even the occaisional "wrench dropped in the dirty oil". Just a quick wipe with a cloth rag has always been enough. I can't recall ever putting away a dirty tool.

Just my 2 bucks

#13 Qman

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 07:23 PM

+1.

In my many years of owning and using tools, I can't recall ever using a chemical or solvent to clean any of them..even the occaisional "wrench dropped in the dirty oil". Just a quick wipe with a cloth rag has always been enough. I can't recall ever putting away a dirty tool.

Just my 2 bucks


That's right...


a clean tool is a well used tool!! :eek:

#14 Scoobywagon

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 10:05 PM

I suppose I should have pointed out that in my shop, we do both greasy, nasty work and interior work. Tools can't track grease and oil and whatever else into someone's interior. So clean tools are VERY important.

#15 The Dude Abides

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 10:36 PM

LOL this almost seems like people are criticizeing me for keeping dirty tools. Its ok, i should take better care of them. I just got out of hand and now i need to take care of them. Gonna organize everything real good. NO hard feelings for givin me crap if thats what your doin. Ive cleaned my tools up with gas before but i cant do that crap in the house.

#16 Qman

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 12:02 AM

I don't think that is what people are doing. You asked for examples and that is what people gave. Don't take it personally.

#17 Qman

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 12:03 AM

I suppose I should have pointed out that in my shop, we do both greasy, nasty work and interior work. Tools can't track grease and oil and whatever else into someone's interior. So clean tools are VERY important.


I can appreciate that. I had a set of interior tools so that wasn't a problem. But, not everyone can have that many duplicates though.

#18 The Dude Abides

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 01:26 AM

Oh i dont take it personally just thought it was interesting alot of people said they clean them up right away. Na i dont take it personallly nor am i mad or anything.




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