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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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Impreza rear drum brakes


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12 replies to this topic

#1 SUBARU3

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Posted 07 February 2004 - 09:21 PM

Any idea on the average life on the original rear shoes?

Todd

#2 SevenSisters

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Posted 07 February 2004 - 11:24 PM

Two hours at Watkins Glenn or three years of freeway driving, maybe more.
I would think it all depends on how you drive and where you live. My rotors generally rust up and chew up the pads. Everything gets replaced after about three years of mostly highway driving.

#3 SUBARU3

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 02:16 AM

Don't drums and shoes last a bit longer? I know on my vintage Subis, they seem to have the originals at 150K and 20 years.


Todd

#4 Setright

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 03:11 AM

60k miles. Nevermind the age. At least inspect them when they reach this mileage.

If you upgrade the front the brakes, the rears will "last longer". However, they will never get up to full operating temp and the friction material will need to be sanded down to expose a fresh layer.

#5 99obw

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 07:45 AM

My experience has been that if exposed to salt, after 3-5 years they don't work very well any more, regardless of how much pad material is left. I have done a lot of rear brake jobs where I get it apart only to find that the pads seem fine.

So I guess my answer is, I don't really know how long they could last in Texas. I can't remember the last time I saw a rear shoe worn out. It could very well be that many miles.

#6 Tolerance02

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 08:17 AM

No matter how you drive, rear drum brakes from Impreza and Legacy (both the same) are very relyable.
No problems at all with stuck or oil leacking cylinders and the shoes are good for ath least 300K km. or 200K miles.
The automatic adjusters also work fine.
The park brake also works much better with drum instead of disc brakes.

Urban.

#7 dgerard

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 09:31 AM

Originally posted by Tolerance02
No matter how you drive, rear drum brakes from Impreza and Legacy (both the same) are very relyable.
No problems at all with stuck or oil leacking cylinders and the shoes are good for ath least 300K km. or 200K miles.
The automatic adjusters also work fine.
The park brake also works much better with drum instead of disc brakes.

Urban.



Can't say that about my '95 Impreza rear drums. I have rear brake pulsation that I have replaced the drums for & resurfaced the drums more than once. The pulsation goes away for a thousand miles and comes back.

#8 Tolerance02

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 09:51 AM

Originally posted by dgerard
Can't say that about my '95 Impreza rear drums. I have rear brake pulsation that I have replaced the drums for & resurfaced the drums more than once. The pulsation goes away for a thousand miles and comes back.



Strange, i have a lot of costumers with Legacy and Impreza, never had to surface or replace one rear drum.
A possible cause may be the wheel nuts to tight (possible if using a pneumatic wrench).
Specific driving conditions also may be the cause but that should give more problems with the front discs to i guess.

Urban.

#9 99obw

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 10:30 AM

Originally posted by dgerard
Can't say that about my '95 Impreza rear drums. I have rear brake pulsation that I have replaced the drums for & resurfaced the drums more than once. The pulsation goes away for a thousand miles and comes back.



If you're doing it right and using good parts that should never happen.

#10 SUBARU3

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 03:01 PM

Thanks for all the feedback!

I was just wondering if the rear drums on the newer cars lasted as ones as on the early ones. Here in TX , no salt!! Horray!! Heck, the late 70s lasted forever! I think mainly because they had "manual" adjusters and they rarely got adjusted.

Both my 95 Impreza "squeak" when cold. They operate quietly when warm. Have 80K on one and 62K on the other. Hate to open it all up if they are fine. I have no braking issues with either and the cars stop perfectly. It's just the cold squeak!

Todd

#11 dgerard

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 06:45 AM

Originally posted by 99obw
If you're doing it right and using good parts that should never happen.



I don't see how it could be done wrong. The lugnuts are torqued down each time. The drums were replaced and then turned true. Could the pads be causing this? Perhaps I should "scuff" them. How about drivetrain issues? This car has 177,000 milies on it!

#12 99obw

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 07:41 AM

I have seen drums from the parts store be out of round when new. That could be the problem. Turning a POS drum probably won't yield good results.

One thing that I have seen cause early failure is contamination of the pad and drum. Make sure the wheel cylinder isn't leaking. Clean everything spotless with brake cleaner. Make sure they are adjusted so they just barely drag when you put them together. With the salt I generally also install a hardware kit when I do drum brakes.

I like to get them hot the first time out, 4 or 5 60-20 MPH slow downs without stopping, then drive about 15 miles without using the brakes to let them cool. Of course you have to be careful where you do this. :D

#13 cookie

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 11:48 AM

with my 99 Forester I had the rear shoes done at 87,000 as they were thin. The front pads had been replaced and were fine except for pulsation.
This year the Forester started squeaking and locking the right rear when cold. As soon as it warmed up it was fine.
When I pulled it down yesterday I had 4MM left at the lowest point. The shoes look as though they were cheap rebuilds.
I had this done at a tire shop and was not happy with the job as I think it should have lasted quite a bit longer.




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