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Harbor Freight Transmission Jack


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20 replies to this topic

#1 zundfolge

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 11:51 PM

Hello all,

I saw this mentioned in a thread here (I think), so I bought one and here is a pic of it in action. Not bad for $80. As a reference, 19" from ground to bottom of control arm bushings.


Also, replace clutch fork whenever the opportunity presents itself.

This one is DEAD at 160k! Still not happy w/ clutch feel, never have been, but at least car is driveable again. Posted Image


Posted Image

#2 Rooster2

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 08:12 AM

Harbor Freight has been a good source of tools to work on my Subie. Quality is really focused towards the do it yourself projects...good enough to get projects done, but not for daily use if you were a mechanic working in a garage. Their torque wrenches don't have the best reputation for being accurate, according to what I have read and heard.

The pic of the trany jack looks like it works well for a cheap $80.

Absolutely everything in the store is made in China. Seems like they should rename the store "China Harbor Freight," to more accurately describe their biz.

Edited by Rooster2, 07 July 2010 - 09:47 AM.
typo correction


#3 heartless

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 08:29 AM

we dont have that particular piece, but we do own a LOT of harbor freight stuff here - for the DIY-er on a tight budget they definitely work for the occasional use/need.

We have everything from nail guns to wrenches to the countertop sized sandblasting cabinet - some things are better than others, but most will do the job required of them. kind of looking at the FWD bearing adapter set right now as I am gonna need to change out a wheel bearing soon...

But like rooster said - for the mechanic working in a 'for profit' garage - eh, probably not the best idea...

Seems like they should rename the store "China Harbor Freight," to more accurately describe their biz.


^ that statement is hilarious - but very true! :lol:

#4 grossgary

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 10:08 AM

nice, thanks for the feedback. so it worked well then? simple and easy?

#5 zundfolge

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 02:36 AM

grossgary:

It worked pretty well; I don't think I could've done the job by bench pressing the transmission, and using just a floor jack would have been difficult.

However, I certainly agree with the other remarks that Harbor Freight tools are not suitable for regular use.

Fortunately, the engine and trans separated pretty easily, because I had the engine out not too long ago for other reasons. You can image how thrilled I was to be going back in just for some piddling little piece of steel...but such is life!

IMO, it's easier to pull the engine than the trans, unless you happen to have access to a lift.

#6 1-3-2-4

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 08:23 AM

I was looking at the same jack in the picture How did it work out for you? Did you have any problems having to tilt the transmission?

#7 brus brother

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 08:29 AM

grossgary:

I don't think I could've done the job by bench pressing the transmission

:lol::lol::lol:
weakling...

#8 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 11:18 AM

I have probably done 20+ transmissions with mine. It works very well considering the alternatives. Like any tool it requires a bit of a learning curve - where to place it and the proper angles to put it at for the Subaru transaxles. I don't use the strap at all for example - and with MT's I turn them sideways on the jack to clear the suspension when rolling them under and then flip them back uprightin the tunnel.

If you don't have a lift.... this is easily the best value out there for doing transmission replacements.

GD

#9 1-3-2-4

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 11:38 AM

The linkage that hooks to the shifter is that easy to remove? do you happen to know how high the tranny sits with the jack lowered?

i know I searched here and someone said about using a tie- down strap I think that connects to where the pitch stop goes but do I have an area on the engine to hook the strap to? I can't remember if it had a mount point in the back.

#10 Gloyale

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 11:44 AM

A 2x4 wood block wedged between the Alt pulley and the upper lip of the radiator support keeps the engine from rocking forward, makes angles better for reinstall.

#11 1-3-2-4

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 12:08 PM

Hmm never thought of that..

as far as dropping the transmission out of the car any bolts in tight areas? I have air tools so I should be ok for that.

I better go get that deadblow hammer i should of picked up months ago

#12 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 12:15 PM

A 2x4 wood block wedged between the Alt pulley and the upper lip of the radiator support keeps the engine from rocking forward, makes angles better for reinstall.


I use a jack and a block of wood under the oil pan to rock the engine back. You can get it farther back and many of the newer rigs have that plastic tank radiator and the amount of flexing that goes on when trying to shove a tranny against the engine when it's resting on the radiator..... makes me nervous. I did use that method in the past but I came up against a few cars where that hasn't worked and thus the new system for me.

GD

#13 1-3-2-4

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 07:33 PM

yeah that sounds like a good idea

#14 bike2work

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 12:47 AM


I use a jack and a block of wood under the oil pan to rock the engine back. You can get it farther back and many of the newer rigs have that plastic tank radiator and the amount of flexing that goes on when trying to shove a tranny against the engine when it's resting on the radiator..... makes me nervous. I did use that method in the past but I came up against a few cars where that hasn't worked and thus the new system for me.

GD

Hi GD,

 

Sorry for bring this thread back. But I really like to know some details about the floor jack method. Did you place the floor jack + wood after the transmission is removed or before? If after, then when we remove the transmission, the engine will tilt but we don't care, then bring it back with the floor jack? Does the tilt make transmission removal more difficult?

 

Thanks!



#15 CNY_Dave

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 10:44 AM

The engine on my auto sube had to be supported, from the top is best.



#16 bike2work

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 11:49 AM

The engine on my auto sube had to be supported, from the top is best.

By "from the top" do you mean the "wood between radiator method" or some other way that is safer?



#17 johnallen337

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 08:19 AM

some of thier tools are great. I'm a retired mechanic (Helicopters) and used one of the 90 degree die grinders for 20 years with no problems. I am also impressed with the "Greeen" handled ratchets, as good as any Snap-On Matco etc. alot of the other tools are quite servicable and of course some are POS. Just know what you need and how important the quality is for the job.

#18 shoebee2

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 03:02 PM

Supporting the engine from the top is the BEST, but not only way. I've done it both ways. From the top use your cherry picker on a grapple point in the rear center. That also helps with reinstall like stat d above.

#19 1-3-2-4

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Posted 11 September 2016 - 11:01 AM

LOL I saw this thread and I forgot I posted in it haha



#20 CNY_Dave

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 12:03 PM

I used a metal bar from top of radiator support to in front of the windshield, I think. Something like that. Bolted it right to something on the intake.



#21 bike2work

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 11:56 AM

Thanks shoebee2 and CNY_Dave! I don't have cherry picker though. Maybe I have to try the jack idea see how it works.






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