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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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Wimpy wheels and tires


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Fuzpile

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 09:49 AM

Whereas the tendency is to go larger with a Legacy
There is something to be said for a strong steel wheel. There is something great about 185X70X14 tires. There is appreciation for the way a wagon can maneuver into tight spaces or make a U-turn in streets only a Honda could go. Effortlessly! This was the engineering that the designers relied upon to something as basic as the "front axles". There are all sorts of ways to make a Cardan or double U-joint stronger. There are CVs and then there was this type which has maximum extension. Couple that to a decent tranny which gives a good balance to torque yet in 4th has very low engine rpm for cruising.
That's pretty much what it is stock.
I like it. I like not looking like some turf eater snoutfaced brute sitting in traffic and Who can gently climb over curb or take on an icey street while the big stuff spin their huge tires. It's stealth and it's fine :banana:

#2 WoodsWagon

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Posted 19 December 2010 - 01:36 PM

Tire size doesn't change turning radius until you get big enough that they rub on the frame at full lock. 205/75r15's fit fine on outbacks, and the turning radius is exactly the same as a legacy with donut spares on it. New gen subarus don't have the extreme lockover angle that older gen ones had, new gen's are pretty average on the turning radius.

#3 Old Yankee

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 01:17 PM

I guess my question is why they put such wimpy tires on Outbacks knowing that we (that do) live in the great frozen north. As you know, we are just coming out of a major snowstorm and freezeup. I tried going out for a necessary trip and got hung up on the snow. My Continentals had no traction whatsoever. I looked for Michelins and a few other brands of more aggressive tires and had very little luck. What do other Subaru drivers use in the snow? Just an old New Hampshire Yankee lost in the flatlands of Michigan  :wacko:



#4 tbolt1003

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 05:09 PM

I just had a set of Dunlop's new WinterMaxx snow/ice tires installed on my Impreza and all I can say is "Wow!!!". These things are incredible in all conditions from ice covered roads to 12" of unplowed snow to rain to 70 degree temps. I looked at some of the higher priced winter tires, but the initial reviews on the WinterMaxx sold me and I couldn't be happier with them.

#5 ocei77

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:23 PM

14" tires etc HAD their place. I like to stop and bigger brakes etc require larger wheels.

I use 17" for warm weather and 16" for snow.

To each their own.

 

O.



#6 shortlid

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 09:05 PM

"Just an old New Hampshire Yankee lost in the flatlands of Michigan"  

 

I feel ya I went to school at Purdue, in Indameana, and most autopart storesdid not even know what winter wiper blades were!!  Back here in New Hampshire I usualy get a set of steelies off a base model shod them with the narrowest tallest snows that fit.  Then use the nice alloys with all seasons reats of the year.  



#7 BB's93LegacyL

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 11:12 PM

North-central Wisconsin here -- I finally decided to go with 4 dedicated winter tires on their own steel wheels. I bought the wheels at a salvage yard for $60 for the set of 4. I'm using Firestone Winterforce tires in the original size that my FWD '93 Legacy L wagon came with, 185/70-14. They are very reasonably priced tires in this size. The snow traction is remarkably good, so much better than any all-season rated tires. Choose a tall & narrow vs. low & wide profile tire for getting through snow, and avoiding pothole damage to your rims.

I live where there are lots of steep hills, and we've already had over 3 feet of snow here this winter with no real thaw. So the side roads have been snow-packed for weeks, with icy spots under the snow and slushy spots where they've salted. There are better-rated ice tires out there, but for deep snow traction, these are rated right up there near the top in the tests by Tirerack. After a recent heavy snow I had a friend who is in law enforcement take it for a drive. His comment after driving was that the tires exceeded his expectations. While I have a set of 4 on my FWD for balanced handling and braking, I can't even imagine how much traction these tires would provide on an AWD vehicle. I put mine on in about mid-November which was about when we had our most recent nighttime temp above freezing, and will change back to the normal wheels & tires in April. These tires make driving in snow fun instead of frustrating. They are noisy on dry pavement -- a small price to pay for the ability to get where I need to go during our long snowy winters. (If you live where ice studs are legal, Winterforce tires are studdable.)


Edited by BB's93LegacyL, 18 January 2014 - 01:08 AM.


#8 1-3-2-4

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:30 AM

I'm using stock Outback sized tires for the winter and will be switching to 205/55R16 for the summers, also my spare is going to be 205/55R16 as well it fits a little funny where the stock tire is, i'm pretty sure you have to store it without air.



#9 Rooster2

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:47 AM

I'm using stock Outback sized tires for the winter and will be switching to 205/55R16 for the summers, also my spare is going to be 205/55R16 as well it fits a little funny where the stock tire is, i'm pretty sure you have to store it without air.

If the spare tire needs to be stored in the "well" un-inflated or low inflated to fit the well space, then carry in your car one of those small tire pumps that is powered by plugging it into the cigarette lighter socket. The pump is an easy way to inflate the spare if needed. Cost is less then $20. I carry one all the time, and check, and fill all my tires at the beginning of each calendar month. That way, my tires are well inflated.



#10 1-3-2-4

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:51 AM

If the spare tire needs to be stored in the "well" un-inflated or low inflated to fit the well space, then carry in your car one of those small tire pumps that is powered by plugging it into the cigarette lighter socket. The pump is an easy way to inflate the spare if needed. Cost is less then $20. I carry one all the time, and check, and fill all my tires at the beginning of each calendar month. That way, my tires are well inflated.

Yeah I knew about that.. but in the case for me I will be using this

 

http://www.amazon.co...=I1JU48AB9K8DED

 

I plan on taking my car on some soft sand this year so while it's not a fully empty tire it's better then waiting 10 min for one tire!



#11 heartless

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:36 AM

after having them on for a little over a month now and having some pretty nasty weather to try them out in, I can highly recommend the Mastercraft Glacier Grip II snow tires - absolutely LOVE them!

 

Excellent traction in snow and on hard packed, icy stuff. As you can see in the pic, they are heavily siped and are studable if studs are allowed in your area. They are a great tire for the money. I went with the 195/75R14 size on the stock steel wheels for my 95 Legacy on Forester struts.

 

Ride and handling are good, and they are pretty quiet as well for a snow tire - not a lot of excess tire noise on dry pavement. Overall, I am very happy with them.



#12 uniberp

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 10:37 AM

14" tires etc HAD their place. I like to stop and bigger brakes etc require larger wheels.

I use 17" for warm weather and 16" for snow.

To each their own.

 

O.

 

Narrow tires are better in snow. A smaller contact patch is partly why. The frontal profile is another main reason.

 

14's give you both.

 

http://www.flickr.co...in/photostream/






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