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In The Middle Of A T Belt Change


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11 replies to this topic

#1 The Dude

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 02:02 PM

I'm replacing the timing belt on my 2006 Subaru Forester with automatic transmission. I checked in advance days ago, but when I got to Harbor Freight the manager said "gee, I'm sorry, I forgot that we stopped carrying that item". The only other chain wrench in town is $260.

So, I'm down to the "jam a really big screwdriver in the flywheel inspection hole" trick. I'd rather use a chain wrench. I just want to be certain that the flywheel inspection hole trick will work on an automatic. Thanks .

FWIW: The Harbor Freight Web Store no longer shows the large chain wrench. It's gone

Edited by The Dude, 26 May 2011 - 04:55 PM.


#2 The Dude

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 03:05 PM

One other thought. It looks you need to pull the radiator to change the upstream O2 sensor on the Forester. I'm at 105,000 should I change the O2 sensor while I've got the radiator out ? Thanks.

Edited by The Dude, 26 May 2011 - 04:52 PM.


#3 Ricearu

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 03:22 PM

don't put a chain wrench on the crank pulley. it may damage it. I have had one break belt "slots" off, then it spun the outer ring off the rubber.:eek: just find a friend with an impact. that takes it right off. triple check everything! if anything is off it could wreck the valves. that is an interference engine. whatever you do, don't go by the HUGE OBVIOUS arrows on the cam sprockets THOSE ARE NOT the timing marks. :eek: The timing "hash" marks will be along the outer ring of the sprockets

#4 987687

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 04:11 PM

I use the starter method. Put a socket with a long breaker bar, or breaker bar with cheater bar over it. Put it on the crank bolt, and the other end on the ground on the driver's side. Make sure everything is tight and secure.

Make sure the engine isn't going to start, disconnect the coil, or engine harness, or whatever. Then turn it over.... Should crack the bolt free!



I'm bracing myself for all the people telling me this is a bad idea. It's worked fine for me.

#5 davebugs

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 04:16 PM

I use the starter method. Put a socket with a long breaker bar, or breaker bar with cheater bar over it. Put it on the crank bolt, and the other end on the ground on the driver's side. Make sure everything is tight and secure.

Make sure the engine isn't going to start, disconnect the coil, or engine harness, or whatever. Then turn it over.... Should crack the bolt free!



I'm bracing myself for all the people telling me this is a bad idea. It's worked fine for me.


Works just fine in a jamb.

But my concern is getting the crank bolt tight again. BAD things happen when it doesn't get tight enough.

#6 987687

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 04:21 PM

Works just fine in a jamb.

But my concern is getting the crank bolt tight again. BAD things happen when it doesn't get tight enough.


Ha, yea. I didn't think about getting it back on. I actually made a crank holder tool for that part. Even so, I'll still use the starter to break it free because it's easier.

#7 Svengouli7

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 04:53 PM

There is a thread around where someone used a pair of extensions in two of the holes on the face of the pulley with a pry bar between.

I've used the chain wrench method 3-4 times before experiencing the rubber inner seperating from the outer ring of the pulley. Yes, it can damage the belt fin guides. Not ideal.

Good news is that beck arnley now has an aftermarket pulley for ej's, if you end up needing it. Got mine from rock auto. While you have one off on hand I'd take the time to use it as a pattern to make a pulley tool. It made my life much easier.

#8 Fairtax4me

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 05:07 PM

The screw driver method works fine. I used a 1/4" allen key on mine. Just don't forget that it's in the bellhousing. It'll get bent when you try to start the engine. :grin:
Put a breaker bar on the crank bolt and turn it until it's at TDC. Stick your screw driver or allen key into the hole it eh bell housing, and while pushing inward, rotate the crank in either direction a few degrees. You'll feel the tool skip then pop into one of the holes in the flex plate. Then the crank will not be able to turn in either direction.

#9 ocei77

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 06:37 PM

I use the starter method. I'm bracing myself for all the people telling me this is a bad idea. It's worked fine for me.


Works for me also, tho I don't do it all the time.

Had an 8" screwdriver break on me once and you can't imagine the horror I felt as I heard the small piece fall in between the flex plate and flywheel.

Wound up using the old style jack handle after that!

Works every time, off and on.

O.

#10 johnceggleston

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 05:49 AM

like this:


the ej22 flex plate has a smaller diameter than the ej25 but you should still be able to find a ''catch''. any catch will do. see below and find a ''catch''. this pic even shows a screwdriver in the hole.

(thanks, google images)



Posted Image


page 3 , here:
http://www.ultimates...3364#post993364

#11 kc8apm

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 08:26 AM

I stick it in 5th and have somebody in the car sit on the brakes...

#12 987687

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 08:27 AM

I stick it in 5th and have somebody in the car sit on the brakes...


That doesn't work on an automatic :rolleyes:




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