Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

what are the long termn effect of shifting with no clutch on a motorcyle


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 brumby420

brumby420

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • Athol Idaho

Posted 20 June 2011 - 08:58 PM

So a bit ago i was riding my 1986 tt350 and the chain broked and slashed through the transmisson case (better that then my leg). I was able to get a truck and get it home and at the time i was honestly thinking it was totalled. I was near correct when i found out a transmission case is $200 used (if they have one) and $800 new from the factory. Seeing as how i spent $300 for this bike i honesty cannot justify spending that much on new parts. I looked at where the hole is and it is right where the clutch input shaft comes in. I suppose i could JB weld it to at least seal it so its not leaking oil but i dont think i could do that without it getting in the way of the clutch linkage thus making it not have a clutch. I know these bikes and most other motorcycles are able to be shifted with no clutch for temporary use but what i was wondering is how bad it is for the transmission to shift with no clutch on a long term basis. I know the basics (clutch cable has broke in the woods before) like get the bike moving before going into first and let off the throttle while shifting but besides that is there anything else i should know.

#2 3eyedwagon

3eyedwagon

    Build it, don't buy it!

  • Members
  • 708 posts
  • Apache Junction

Posted 20 June 2011 - 11:17 PM

Match the RPMs up, and you'll be fine. I ride motorcycles alot, and rarely use a clutch once rolling. IE: from 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd. Downshifting as well. As long as you are in the neighborhood with your RPMs you should have little problem. The only problem you'll have is if you are accelerating hard, and trying to shift up, or, are revving to high and trying to downshift.

All you are doing when shifting without a clutch is making the gears engage more quickly than they otherwise would. The gears receive a little bit of shock whether using the clutch or not. The gears are incredibly hardened, and will handle tons of abuse. It takes alot of hard shifts to wear them out, and make them break. I've shifted this way on just about everything I've ridden. Four wheelers, dirt bikes, sport bikes, and custom styled motorcycles. The long term affect is that you'll wear your gears a little quicker than you would otherwise, but, we are talking very little difference if done right. I've torn dirtbike/fourwheeler transmissions apart on bikes that have been shifted this way their whole lives, alot of them shifted clutchless without lifting off the throttle, and they all looked fine. I won't tell you that you can't pop a gear, because you can, but, you can pop a gear shifting with the clutch too. I'd run it.

It will be a little tougher getting going, but, just park on a hill, and avoid stop signs. You'll be fine.

Don't overlook taking the outter case to a tig welder. You may be able to find someone who can build up the aluminum housing, and then you can "machine" it back to "ok". I've used this fix on some things that weren't worth dumping alot of money into, and had good results.

Edited by 3eyedwagon, 20 June 2011 - 11:25 PM.


#3 brumby420

brumby420

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • Athol Idaho

Posted 20 June 2011 - 11:31 PM

Match the RPMs up, and you'll be fine. I ride motorcycles alot, and rarely use a clutch once rolling. IE: from 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd. Downshifting as well. As long as you are in the neighborhood with your RPMs you should have little problem. The only problem you'll have is if you are accelerating hard, and trying to shift up, or, are revving to high and trying to downshift.

All you are doing when shifting without a clutch is making the gears engage more quickly than they otherwise would. The gears receive a little bit of shock whether using the clutch or not. The gears are incredibly hardened, and will handle tons of abuse. It takes alot of hard shifts to wear them out, and make them break. I've shifted this way on just about everything I've ridden. Four wheelers, dirt bikes, sport bikes, and custom styled motorcycles. The long term affect is that you'll wear your gears a little quicker than you would otherwise, but, we are talking very little difference if done right. I've torn dirtbike/fourwheeler transmissions apart on bikes that have been shifted this way their whole lives, alot of them shifted clutchless without lifting off the throttle, and they all looked fine. I won't tell you that you can't pop a gear, because you can, but, you can pop a gear shifting with the clutch too. I'd run it.

It will be a little tougher getting going, but, just park on a hill, and avoid stop signs. You'll be fine.

Don't overlook taking the outter case to a tig welder. You may be able to find someone who can build up the aluminum housing, and then you can "machine" it back to "ok". I've used this fix on some things that weren't worth dumping alot of money into, and had good results.


Do you happen to know of any people on here who are good at aluminum welding and wont charge an arm and a leg. I never thought of having it welded but it sounds like a good idea.

#4 3eyedwagon

3eyedwagon

    Build it, don't buy it!

  • Members
  • 708 posts
  • Apache Junction

Posted 21 June 2011 - 12:33 AM

I'm not from your area, but, try thinking out of the box when it comes to finding a good aluminum weldor. You won't necessarily want to go to nothing but the listed fabrication shops as the majority of them will deal in steel. There may be some boat repair places in your area, or look for food processing manufacturers. Think of anywhere that uses alot of aluminum, and stainless. Dairy equipment places are another one. So are trailer manufacturers.

Try starting at your local welding store. The weldors have to get their gear somewhere, and they'll often leave business card on the bulletin board. Ask the guys behind the counter, and tell them exactly what you're up to. Alot of the people that work at the weld shops can weld themselves, and may be willing to tackle it for you when they aren't busy. Most welding equipment stores have machines set up in the back, and might be able to give you a hand. I'm not sure if there are any vocational schools, or technical colleges in your area, but, check them out if there are. You can probably find someone at one of them that will do it the cheapest. We did this kind of work all the time for donations to our college chapter of the American Welding Society.

#5 brumby420

brumby420

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • Athol Idaho

Posted 21 June 2011 - 01:54 AM

I'm not from your area, but, try thinking out of the box when it comes to finding a good aluminum weldor. You won't necessarily want to go to nothing but the listed fabrication shops as the majority of them will deal in steel. There may be some boat repair places in your area, or look for food processing manufacturers. Think of anywhere that uses alot of aluminum, and stainless. Dairy equipment places are another one. So are trailer manufacturers.

Try starting at your local welding store. The weldors have to get their gear somewhere, and they'll often leave business card on the bulletin board. Ask the guys behind the counter, and tell them exactly what you're up to. Alot of the people that work at the weld shops can weld themselves, and may be willing to tackle it for you when they aren't busy. Most welding equipment stores have machines set up in the back, and might be able to give you a hand. I'm not sure if there are any vocational schools, or technical colleges in your area, but, check them out if there are. You can probably find someone at one of them that will do it the cheapest. We did this kind of work all the time for donations to our college chapter of the American Welding Society.


Ok ill go ask around. thanks for the help man.

#6 nipper

nipper

    Semi Elite Master of the

  • Members
  • 17,908 posts
  • Long Island NY

Posted 21 June 2011 - 11:39 AM

Once you start off from a start, it is just like a manual tgranny in a car, match teh RPM and the tranny deosnt care. Chains stretch and will brake over time. I used to replace mine at every 20K with the rear sprocket.

#7 brumby420

brumby420

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • Athol Idaho

Posted 21 June 2011 - 06:22 PM

Once you start off from a start, it is just like a manual tgranny in a car, match teh RPM and the tranny deosnt care. Chains stretch and will brake over time. I used to replace mine at every 20K with the rear sprocket.


i didnt and now im paying for it more then ever.

#8 MilesFox

MilesFox

    Catch this Fox!

  • Members
  • 10,675 posts
  • Madison/Milwaukee, WI

Posted 22 June 2011 - 12:12 AM

i had an 81 suzuki gn400 with a broken cable. I drove it 150 miles with a passenger. Push off in neutral and pop the gear once rolling.

when stopping, shift into neutral, and repeat step one. With normal driving, the clutch is really only necessary yo get rolling form a stop.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users