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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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What Paint is "best"?


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34 replies to this topic

#26 Scoobywagon

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 04:14 PM

Im going flat because thats less stuff to mix


Actually, flat black requires an additional additive. When you paint, you mix color and reducer to get a gloss finish. If you want flat, you add a flattener.

#27 Scoobywagon

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 04:19 PM

So what type of paint to spray for black then thats not flat? I'm not sure how semi glossy would look


Again, the Nason Fast Dry is a good choice. I think what I like best about it is just how hard it is when finished. It is equipment paint, after all. Its a single stage, so its about as simple as it gets. But you can clear coat it if you want.

#28 1-3-2-4

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 09:57 AM

Yeah but a clear over flat black wont it give it a semi-gloss shine? It's really no big deal I just want to repaint the car one color.

The only rust spot I need to take care of is the passenger side rear panel just above where that black piece goes.

Both fenders could be replaced because both are dented in.. but so have I seen most 2nd gen wagons.. very easy to dent them just leaning over into the engine bay.

#29 Scoobywagon

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 01:54 PM

No, the paint is already somewhat shiny. It has a flat appearance because the flattener gives it a rough finish. You could achieve a semi-gloss (I think) by using less flattener. It also occurs that you could try shooting the color straight and adding the flattener to the clear coat.

#30 3eyedwagon

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 03:54 PM

You guys really NEED to read up on this. The answers to questions being thrown around are incomplete at best. A flattening agent is used in the clear coat on a base coat/clear coat system, NOT the base coat. There is really NO POINT in using a flattening agent in the base coat, unless you intend to not clear coat it, at which point you'd be better off just waiting a week. Nature will make an unprotected base coat pretty flat in a matter of days. Most base coats come out pretty dull anyways. The clear coat is what adds shine, and depth. I would bet you could throw alot of flattening agent in a base coat, and still get good shine with multiple unflattened clear coats. That is what a clear coat is for.

There are plenty of ways to skin this cat, but, you need to do some reading, and then decide if you want to use a base coat/clear coat, or a single stage paint. Then from there you'll need to research how to achieve the matte look you want. Each process requires a different way of obtaining the flat/matte/semi gloss look. With a clear coat you can scuff/fine scotch brite the clear coat, or add flattening agent to the CLEAR. With most single stages you can buy a ready to shoot flat/matte/semi gloss, or add flattening agent to a gloss color if you are trying to get an exotic color.

Read up, you need to get educated on this, because people are filling you with various answers, and until you have some perspective, they are all useless.

#31 Scoobywagon

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 04:14 PM

Sorry, I should have been more clear. I was referring to using the flattener on single stage paint. Specifically the Nason Fast Dry.

#32 PRND3L

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 05:07 PM

Chip Gaurd; the bubbly, lumpy, bumpy stuff on the very bottom of the fenders and rocker panels.

To repaint a car do you completely remove it, OR just sand it to a fairly smooth state?

:banghead:

#33 3eyedwagon

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 07:24 PM

Chip Gaurd; the bubbly, lumpy, bumpy stuff on the very bottom of the fenders and rocker panels.

To repaint a car do you completely remove it, OR just sand it to a fairly smooth state?

:banghead:



It all depends on what kind of quality you want out of the finished product. If you don't mind a wavy job, go ahead and just sand it. If you are looking for no distortion, you obviously go ahead and remove it.

You may also want to check for compatibility with the paint you are going to be using. If you just sand the surface of the chip guard it will be releasing stored gasses, and if those gasses are not compatible with the paint being put over top of it.... bad things will happen. Fisheyes, complete seperation, sloughing, and others. I'd try to figure out what that stuff is made off, or, I'd just get started on removing all of it. You could also try shooting a test pass over some of it.

Having fun yet???? :lol:

Take your time. You'll get there... just think of all the stuff you're learning along the way. Can't say the same for the people that go to Maaco!!:)

#34 PRND3L

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 11:03 PM

It all depends on what kind of quality you want out of the finished product. If you don't mind a wavy job, go ahead and just sand it. If you are looking for no distortion, you obviously go ahead and remove it.

You may also want to check for compatibility with the paint you are going to be using. If you just sand the surface of the chip guard it will be releasing stored gasses, and if those gasses are not compatible with the paint being put over top of it.... bad things will happen. Fisheyes, complete seperation, sloughing, and others. I'd try to figure out what that stuff is made off, or, I'd just get started on removing all of it. You could also try shooting a test pass over some of it.

Having fun yet???? :lol:

Take your time. You'll get there... just think of all the stuff you're learning along the way. Can't say the same for the people that go to Maaco!!:)


Sanded it to a smoothish state, some bumps are kinda visable and i still have its protection. Overall it looks great having paint sprayed on top of it. :banana:

#35 edwardrich01

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 06:56 AM

use Rustoleum Flat Black.its easy to shoot...




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