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1991 Loyale Wagon - let the build begin.


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144 replies to this topic

#26 SmashedGlass

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 11:57 AM

And that's exactly what happened to my jeep, I couldn't afford it, the cost of gassing it up verses the mileage it got towing a trailer was terrible.

This will be more within budget for me, and while I don't expect it to do this: I do expect it to do it's intended job for an economical price.


I almost fell out of my chair, and spewed coffee dangerously close to my laptop. That was the funniest 8 seconds I've seen all week.

#27 Stubies Subie

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 06:26 PM

I almost fell out of my chair, and spewed coffee dangerously close to my laptop. That was the funniest 8 seconds I've seen all week.


I thought that was a good video when I saw it.

Today while driving to work, I saw a subaru wagon with a canoe on the roof towing a pop up camping trailer, it looked like a newer Legacy Outback, but what the heck, it was a subie, and it was towing something, I shoulda had my camera :clap:

oh yeah, and the cams came back, I talked to Generaal Disorder today, we're going to clean up the new block tomorrow, then the re-assembly begins, I can almost hear it running now! YEE-HAW!

#28 Stubies Subie

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 02:24 AM

we did some more cleaning today, well Rugby_Subie did more cleaning today, we're going to go back tomorrow and do some more.

General disorder said we could start reassembly tomorrow.

Here’s a picture of what we did get clean:
Posted Image

it was a mess, but the more Rugby_Subie cleaned, the better it looked, all 4 cylinders look really good, and I'm finally starting to get excited to get it back together, with the torque cams, I'm thinking that this engine is going to have a sound all it's own.

I did some major searching the other night for EA82's with torque cams installed and found nothing, while I did find a few posts of people that talked about doing it, I found nothing in reference to it actually being done.

when it's up and running I'll be sure to get some good recordings of the sound, I plan on doing a simple exhaust mod to get a deeper throaty sound, although at this point, I'm not quite sure what that's going to be.

I'll have more to post tomorrow, pictures today are complements of Rugby_Subie because I forgot my camera, tomorrow I'll be sure to bring mine and get more photos.

Stuart

#29 Stubies Subie

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 05:51 PM

ok, disappointing news, at least for me, my other Car broke down today and I was never able to make it over to General Disorders house, I spent all day working on our 2001 Buick Century, we finally got it running a few minutes ago.

it wasn't that bad of a job, but it took me a while to figure out what I was doing, once I got it figured out, it went quick, but I still didn't get it done in time to go to GD's place, hopefully I'll have better news for you at some point this coming week.

Stuart

#30 Stubies Subie

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 03:09 PM

Ok, I know it’s been a while since I posted, but that’s not to say that we haven’t been working on the Subaru.

I kept forgetting my camera, so Rugby Subie took a few and emailed them to me, and I’ve been busy with family life so I haven’t had a chance to really update this thread like I would like to.

So here we go: we got the engine back together.

There’s been some good and bad with this project but with General disorders expertise, I think we were able to circumvent a couple of possibly costly problems that arose with the reseal.

When we got the cams back, they had some pitting on them, not on the parts that were ground, but where the cam rides in the housing.

Here’s a picture of the cam tower installed
Posted Image

General disorder was able to clean them up enough to keep the seals from leaking …yeah!!!

We did have to change out the bell housing on the new motor because it was broke, but the old one was fine.

Here’s a picture of the engine heads and cam towers all bolted back on, it cleaned up real nice. this is also where we started running into trouble with the oil pump, we had at least 4 used oil pumps where the bypass check valve was blown out which rendered the oil pumps useless, we finally found one that was good, and continued on with our assembly
Posted Image

Here’s a picture of general disorder installing the belts:
Posted Image

And a picture of the motor all put back together, although we are waiting on a couple of parts, so it’s not going to be ready to install until at least Wednesday:
Posted Image

And last but not least, in order to understand the workings on a flat 4, you must become one with the flat 4 …here I am trying to become one with my motor …..
Posted Image

Actually, in that last picture, I’m just thankful we got it back together, this has been an expensive learning experience for me, but when it’s back on the road, it should be a pretty nice driving car.

at some point down the road, when I have more money, I'll buy a new oil pump, and I'll also pick up an oil cooler, but for now, I'm just thankful we are able to get it running without leaking and blowing headgaskets.

the engine that was in the car when I got it turned out to be a peace of junk needing a complete rebuild, so if there's one thing I've learned .....miles on a car mean nothing, it's how it was taken care of that counts. ....General Disorder said he'd seen better engines with more then 250,000 miles that were in better shape then the one I had.

Edited by Stubies Subie, 17 October 2011 - 03:17 PM.


#31 Stubies Subie

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 04:08 AM

We made some more progress today, probably the most progress in a single day.

We pretty much got the rest of the parts, and put the finishing touches on the motor.

I wanted to pressure wash the engine bay and get rid of years of grease and grime, and had been putting it off because it was such a dirty job, but in reality, it ended up being about as easy of a job as anything we’ve done to this car so far.

Here’s a picture of what it looked like under the hood before we started cleaning:

Posted Image

I went to the corner grocery store and picked up this bottle of simple green:

Posted Image

A few weeks ago, I went to Harbor freight and picked up an engine cleaning gun, part number: 68290, here’s a link: http://www.harborfre...-gun-68290.html

Here’s a picture of the gun:

Posted Image

The gun is about $7.00 and I will tell you, if you have an air compressor, it will be a very well spent $7.00.

We only used a half bottle of simple green with this gun, and was able to cover everything under the hood, and I do mean EVERYTHING, and the longer you let it soak, the better it cleans.

We didn’t let it sit at all, mostly because we were in a hurry to get the engine mounted before dark, so we only let ir soak for a couple of minutes before we took General Disorders pressure washer to it, his pressure washer is something like 2800 psi and has hot on demand 140 degree water.

5 minutes after we started pressure washing/steam cleaning, it looked like this under the hood:

Posted Image

And 30 minutes after that, we had the engine mounted:

Posted Image

And here’s another picture of the engine in place:

Posted Image

It’s looking like we’re going to have it running Saturday, we gave up for the day because it was getting to dark to see, but all that’s left is to hook everything up, rebuild the power steering pump (it was leaking to) and then do the electric fan conversion.

#32 Stubies Subie

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 04:30 AM

We’ve put so many new parts into this reseal, it’s hard to keep track, but so far, as best as I can remember we’ve done:

All new seals, including the rear main
new head gaskets
New timing belts
New water pump
Used but good oil pump
Used but good XT6 clutch set, including flywheel, clutch disk, pressure plate with less then 10,000 miles on them, they did look pretty much brand new.
New pilot bearing, and throw out bearing
All new coolant hoses
New coolant
New thermostat
New PCV valve and hose
New used block and heads, the ones I had were pretty much shot, so we found a good engine with less then 125,000 miles on it and decided to work with that instead. (we could have just dropped that engine in the way is was, but I wanted to go through it anyway)
Compression cam grind
Shell Rotella T6 full synthetic motor oil
New oil filter
Rebuilt power steering pump
Electric fan conversion
New NGK spark plugs and wires

Plus some stuff not related to the engine repair like:

Nice used blue floor mats out of a wrecking yard, (the interior is blue)
used ash tray, the car came without one
new rear tailgate lift struts
a pet barrier for the back, to keep our dog where she belongs on long road trips.
This I actually pulled out of my old jeep, so I’ve had it for years but it fit the Loyale perfectly.
New wiper blades front and rear.
Halogen backup lights from JCwhitney, I had them for years to, I bought those back in 97 when I bought my new garden tractor and used them as headlights, but beins how I never drive the tractor in the dark, I donated the back up light bulbs to the Loyale, and they are really bright, I think they are worth the investment if you can get a set.

I’m sure I’m forgetting some stuff, but that’s all I can think of at the moment.

Edited by Stubies Subie, 21 October 2011 - 04:36 AM.


#33 Stubies Subie

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 06:45 PM

Sorry I was a little slow in getting this thread updated, the engine is back in the car:
Posted Image

We did kind of get off the a rough start with this new engine, and when we first got it running it ran like crap, and wouldn’t idle at all, it had something like 180 lbs compression on the two drivers side cylinders, and something like 100 lbs compression on the passenger side, but with some acetone treatments in the bad cylinders, following by some treatments of seafoam, we were able to bring the compression back up on the low cylinders,

It turned out that the new block just needed the rings freed up and a good cleaning, we did the seafoam through the intake, and also in the oil, as well as through the gas tank,

It’s now running pretty good, I’ve got 400 miles on it to date, and the more it’s driven the better it runs.

I had to try out the 4 wheel drive, so here’s a picture of it sitting out in the middle of our field:
Posted Image

This is just the beginning, there will be more updates to come, more things added to the car ect. .. just as soon as I pay off General Disorder, this has been somewhat of an expensive ordeal, but for the money spent, I’m very happy with what I got and believe that I now have a good foundation for an awesome build.

#34 Stubies Subie

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 07:16 PM

this is a short video clip of the exhaust so you can hear what the torque cams sound like on an ea82, I guess we can call this my before video, I am going to have a 2" exhaust put on it from the cat back, not sure what I want to do for a resonator and muffler yet though, I still need to think about that one.


Edited by Stubies Subie, 01 November 2011 - 07:21 PM.


#35 Stubies Subie

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 07:46 PM

These EA82’s are notorious for having over heating issues, I’ve read and heard time and again how the radiators are barely adequate, so when it came to this rebuild, I thought it would be in my better interest to have some form of cooling system filter.

Running these filters has paid off, in the 4oo miles I’ve driven the car, the heater core filter has plugged up twice, and the radiator filter has plugged up once, they are simple to clean, and I’ve gotten all sorts of junk out of them that would have otherwise ended up in the radiator or heater core, and for me I’d rather have that junk go in a filter I can clean out, you would be surprised at the amount of debris you got floating around in your cooling system, it’s that junk and debris that plugs them up, and I’d much rather clean a filter for free, rather then replace a plugged up radiator at $100 plus.

Here are some pictures of the filters:

This is the radiator filter:
Posted Image

And here’s a picture of it installed on my car:
Posted Image

And here’s a picture of the heater core filter:
Posted Image

I don’t have a picture of the heater core filter installed at the moment because it’s buried under my spare tire, so next time I got the tire out, I’ll take a picture of i

#36 Quidam

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 08:14 PM

Hi,

Those filters look interesting and thanks for the report!

FYI, a dual core radiator is still available for your car.

Your original motor was badly worn I take it, and I read where the original cam cases were put on your new motor.

Save the "new" cam cases, you may need them.

hth

Doug

#37 Stubies Subie

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 09:16 PM

The old motor had a washed out cylinder, then we found one that had good cylinders and 123,000 miles on it, and that's the one we chose to go with but it ended up having sticky rings, but we have since got those freed up.

I wanted a 2 row radiator, but found the part numbers to be misleading, they got a part number for one, but to the best of my knowledge, when you order it, what you end up with is a single row for an EA81, so I decided to go with general disorders suggestion and got one for something like 75 or 80 bucks, but it is a single row.

And I gave away the old engine to Rugby Subie, so the cam towers are gone, but I didn't figure on having any troubles with the ones i got.

My long term plans are to find another motor and build it up as we did this one and have it on hand as a spare, but that's a while off yet.

I still owe money on this build, once I get that paid off, I'll continue on with the car.

FYI, a dual core radiator is still available for your car.

Your original motor was badly worn I take it, and I read where the original cam cases were put on your new motor.

Save the "new" cam cases, you may need them.

hth

Doug



#38 Stubies Subie

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 09:55 PM

I really like the idea of the cooling system filters, we got filters for the air to keep it clean going into the engine, we got a filter for the oil to keep it clean, and we got a filter for the fuel, but nothing at all for the cooling system.

From my own experience, I can tell you, I’ve pulled some weird stuff out of those cooling system filters, from what looked like chunks of hair to sludge and bits and peaces of gasket material and sealer.

I promise you, your cooling system isn’t near as clean as you might think it is, and it’s all that debris that I keep pulling out of the filters that would otherwise be plugging up my brand new radiator.

And unlike the fuel system, or the air system, the cooling system is a closed system, so while it may seem that your doing a lot of unclogging when the filters are new, after 400 to 500 miles or so, your going to notice that the filters are needing to be cleaned less and less, and after a while, you won’t need to clean them any more often then you change an oil filter.

But, when you first start using a cooling system filter, be prepared for collecting a lot of junk in them.

#39 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 10:21 PM

Not to worry Stuart - the cam cases we used were fine. I inspected them. The damage to the original engine was from prolonged running with a bad head gasket - the cylinder wall damage was from coolant exposure. The engine showed no signs of damage with respect to the cam case bearing surfaces, or oil passages, and they checked out flat and true.... as would seem obvious from the how clean the engine is underneath - not a leak to be found anywhere. You can thank Anearobic flange sealant technology for that miracle on the EA engines ;). No more cork for you!

GD

Edited by GeneralDisorder, 01 November 2011 - 10:25 PM.


#40 Stubies Subie

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 12:13 AM

I ain't worried about it at all, I think it came out fine.

I like the idea of being able to park an EA82 with 147,000 miles on it in my garage, and not see a single drop of oil or coolant on the floor.

I've heard it said that they all leak oil, ...I know of at least one that don't :D

Not to worry Stuart - the cam cases we used were fine. I inspected them. The damage to the original engine was from prolonged running with a bad head gasket - the cylinder wall damage was from coolant exposure. The engine showed no signs of damage with respect to the cam case bearing surfaces, or oil passages, and they checked out flat and true.... as would seem obvious from the how clean the engine is underneath - not a leak to be found anywhere. You can thank Anearobic flange sealant technology for that miracle on the EA engines ;). No more cork for you!

GD



#41 man on the moon

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 01:09 AM

Can you point me in the general direction of these cooling system filters? At the moment mine is 'ok' (well, no, but it's not 'bad', either. yet.), but I briefly owned another Loyale I picked up for $300 because the radiator blew a hole. I stuck it up with bubble gum and drove it home, patched it with JB weld after what seemed like a week of flushing it out with cleaner/stuff and a hose. The overflow tank required solvent, it was so bad. The narrow hose feeding the overflow tank was sufficiently plugged to require my calling on a straightened coat hanger.

I ended up using the rad out of my previous/current Loyale as I wasn't driving it for a while, the one in the 'new' car was so gnarly.

Anyway, I want to get this car nowhere NEAR that bad if you might be so kind as to gesture in a general direction of where to get this filter! In the meanwhile, google is my friend, I guess.

#42 Stubies Subie

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 05:24 AM

There’s two types of filters you can get, from a couple of manufactures, there’s Gano, out of California, and there’s Tefba, made in Australia and sold out of Texas.

You can see what the Gano filter looks like a few posts back.

This is what a Tefba filter looks like:
Posted Image

A couple of things first: the filters are not cheap, my personal opinion is that they are over priced with the Cano filters at about $35 each and $20 for the cooling system filter.

The Tefba filter is about $80.

Both filters are liftime filters so you do only have to buy them once, you never have to replace them, just clean them out.

The heater core filter is just a couple of reguler 5/8th inch brass garden hose end fittings (male and female) with a mesh screen filter that I'm pretty sure you could pick up at your local home depot or hardware store.

I have used both the Tefba and the Gano, and personally I prefer the Tefba filters because they are super easy to clean, just unscrew the lid, pull out the filter, clean it, reinsert and screw the lid back on and your done.

The gano filter has to be taken out of the upper radiator hose to be cleaned than reinstalled back into the upper radiator hose again.

I went with the Gano filter on this build because it was cheaper, but will probably switch over to a Tefba filter at a later date.

One works just as good as the other. And even though they are over priced, I still think it’s worth it.

Here’s the link to Gano: http://autocoolantfilter.com/

Here’s the link to Tefba: http://www.tefba.com/index.html

Edited by Stubies Subie, 02 November 2011 - 05:38 AM.


#43 Stubies Subie

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 04:20 AM

I reached 550 miles today on the new engine, (used block) and decided to take a compression reading when I got home from work tonight. They still seem to be all out of whack from each other, but it is running better.

Drivers side back cylinder (closest to fire wall) 175 lbs
Drivers side front cylinder (closest to radiator) 115 lbs
Passenger side back cylinder (closest to fire wall) 125 lbs
Passenger side front cylinder (closest to radiator) 135 lbs

I did that on a warm motor with all spark plugs removed, and throttle wide open.

My compression tester is pretty old and beat up, but it works good on the boat motors, so I would assume it’s going to be ok for the car.

I would think they should all be close to 175 lbs, so maybe I need to soak the cylinders in some more acetone to see if I can bring the low ones up, or maybe drive it some more and check it again in another 500 miles and see if they evened out any better.

Not quite sure what to do about that yet.

#44 Quidam

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 01:18 PM

"as would seem obvious from the how clean the engine is underneath - not a leak to be found anywhere. You can thank Anearobic flange sealant technology for that miracle on the EA engines ;). No more cork for you!"

What he's saying is, he used that on the oil pan and closed the clearance up oil pan to pickup tube, increasing the stress on the oil system.

Your water pump has no gasket? Your pulleys may not be aligned now. Miricle my rump roast.

Doug

#45 Stubies Subie

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 01:58 PM

"as would seem obvious from the how clean the engine is underneath - not a leak to be found anywhere. You can thank Anearobic flange sealant technology for that miracle on the EA engines ;). No more cork for you!"

What he's saying is, he used that on the oil pan and closed the clearance up oil pan to pickup tube, increasing the stress on the oil system.

Your water pump has no gasket? Your pulleys may not be aligned now. Miricle my rump roast.

Doug



I'm sorry but I can't quite buy that assessment, the pulley is lined up, it’s dead on, we double checked it, and the cork for the oil pan is maybe 1/8th inch thick at most, then when you torque down the pan bolts, it squishes it even flatter, It has great oil pressure.

I’m sure if you could get inside an oil pan and measure the distance from the bottom of the pickup screen to the bottom of the pan, no two cars would measure alike, and how many of these “off road” EA82’s are driving around with crunched pans from bottoming out? Wouldn’t that decrease the clearance as well? I know they are supposed to at least have a factory skid plate protecting the pan, but I'll bet you dollars to donuts, there's a good number of EA82's running around without them.

My car has never been off road the pan is flawless, no dents at all. Sometimes you gotta think outside the box, take a chance, dare to be different, Technology changes with time.

If it’s assumed that not using a gasket on the oil pan is a bad thing, then let me be the guinea pig and prove that theory un-true.

Your assessment really does sound legible, but with new better and more advanced sealants, I believe it to be false.

I believe the uneven cylinder compression wasn’t caused by the way the engine was assembled, but rather from the amount of time the engine sat unused, and because of that the rings aren’t seating properly.

I’m confident with a little help, that ring problem will work itself out.

Edited by Stubies Subie, 03 November 2011 - 05:07 PM.


#46 Quidam

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 06:16 PM

Well, I can assure you that GD doesn't have a clue as to the forces at work here. Take a look.
http://www.ultimates...&pictureid=3119
I have measured it all up and as you can see, the suction and abrasion is enough to suck the finish right off the oil pan.
http://www.ultimates...&pictureid=3114

Did he replace the o ring on the oil pickup tube? NM. It will have more suction on it now.
http://www.ultimates...&pictureid=3113

Sincerely,

Doug

I suggest you stop payment.

#47 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 07:19 PM

And I can assure YOU that GD knows exactly what the forces involved are.

The pickup tube has plenty of clearance with the bottom of the pan and the engine has excellent oil pressure. The reduction of pan clearance without the gasket is less than 1/16" and is not significant with a stock engine and oil pump. If a high volume oiling system were to be implemented then you would need a dry sump to supply it with the volume needed.

Here is the gasket crush with an OEM pan gasket. A little more than 1/32":

Posted Image

Pan depth is 4-29/32" (with gasket - without gasket the pan is 4-7/8", or more precisely [it's Japanese] the pan is 124mm deep):

Posted Image

Pickup tube height from pan mounting surface of block: 4-3/8" (111mm) to the screen:

Posted Image

Subtracting the (lets say it's 1/32") of gasket from the numbers - we get a clearance, pickup tube to pan, of almost exactly 1/2" (13mm).

The pickup screen is 2" (50mm) in diameter:

Posted Image

Now - lets consider the surface area that is represented by the imaginary cylindrical edge of a 1/2" thick, by 2" diameter cylinder - without ends of course. This is described by the circumference multiplyed by the height (imagine it as a stretched out rectangle that is 1/2" by (Pie)*diameter). In this case that would be (2 * 3.14159) * .5 or approximately 3.14159 square inches of surface area. (or 2042 square mm :-p)

The cross-sectional surface area of the pickup tube itself is less than .25 square inches (it's actually about 132 square mm) and is thus over 15 times more restrictive than the area that is available to the pickup screen WITH the reduction from the loss of the gasket thickness! The bottle-neck of the system from the pan to the pump is CLEARLY the pickup tube itself. Anyone with an ounce of common sense could see that without even doing any math. I only do the (rudimentary) math here to show how incredibly wrong, lacking in common sense and without a "thumbnail" sense of geometry you really are. I hate to say it - but I took all the measurements involved in this setup into consideration at a mere glance and came to the conclusion that the numbers involved were trivial and need not even be calculated - I only measured it and took pictures for the sake of argument and to show how badly you misjudged the tollerances.

Your arguement is 100% specious and without merrit. Further I do not appreciate your attack's on my work. You have not seen my work and you obviously can't understand it nor do the basic math behind your own arguments against it. I sugest you keep your trap shut and appear an idiot instead of opening it and removing all doubt.

Pickup tube o-rings are always replaced in my shop. With HNBR.

Pulley alignment is absolutely perfect. It was aligned with carefully selected flat washers behind the pulley to compensate for the lack of a gasket. And in any case it's a v-belt driven pump. Pulley alignment isn't that critical with v-belts. Within 1/16" is perfectly acceptable.

GD

Edited by GeneralDisorder, 09 November 2011 - 02:42 AM.


#48 Stubies Subie

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 10:49 PM

Thanks for clearing that up GD, I feel bad because it seems like every time I post something about my car, someone doesn't like it.

I have complete confidence in GD's work, if I didn't I wouldn't have hired him.

Trust me, as a customer, I'm not that easy to get along with and he puts up with me anyway, that says something all by itself, I can be a pain in the butt, I always want things done yesterday and I tend to be a bit of a perfectionist, I have to see for myself that the smallest little detail isn't overlooked, I will literally be looking over his shoulder as he works on my car, and if I don’t like something he’s doing, I’m going to tell him, so trust me when I say, I can be a pain in the butt.

GD does do a good job, and he explains everything.

Sometimes we have to think outside the box, if we refuse to use the modern technology that’s available to us, then you’re stuck using the ways of our ancestors, and if that’s the case, then Subaru wouldn’t exist, and we’d all be driving Studebakers.

Now with that behind us, let’s move on to the next little challenge, the compression problem:

It looks like we got a rusty/sticky ring issue, with the engine, and doing some internet searching, it looks like the method of choice would be to do a 50/50 mix of acetone and ATF.

I found this reference which I thought was interesting:

"The April/May 2007 edition of Machinist's Workshop did a test of penetrating oils where they measured the force required to loosen rusty test devices. Buy the issue if you want to see how they did the test. The results reported were interesting. The lower the number of pounds the better. Mighty interesting results for simple acetone and tranny fluid!

Penetrating oil . Average load .. Price per fluid ounce
None ............ ..... 516 pounds .
WD-40 ............ .. 238 pounds .. $0.25
PB Blaster ......... 214 pounds .. $0.35
Liquid Wrench ... 127 pounds .. $0.21
Kano Kroil ........ 106 pounds .. $0.75
ATF-Acetone mix.. 53 pounds .. $0.10

The ATF-Acetone mix was a 50/50 mix (1 to 1 ratio)."

What I found in my searching was two different opinions of the sticky ring syndrome, there’s the guy that said, pull the pistons, re-ring or clean, and then there were the guys that said, give it a penetrating oil treatment.

I also read about the success rate, I found that interesting to, nowhere did I find any reference to – “I had to pull the pistons to cure the problem”
Most all the success stories I read, pointed to using some form of penetrating oil, most notably, a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone to free up the rings.

The one trick that really seemed to do the job was forcing the mix past the piston and rings by way of forced air.

I’ll give that a shot and report back my findings.

Edited by Stubies Subie, 03 November 2011 - 10:51 PM.


#49 1982gl4

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 11:20 PM

Keep at the good work! Don't let others get you down. It's your project after all, and it looks like it's coming along very nicely.

I'm also very interested on what you find out with the rings, sounds interesting and very useful info, I could have used it a few times myself. Definitely keep us posted on your findings.

#50 Stubies Subie

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 12:13 AM

Keep at the good work! Don't let others get you down. It's your project after all, and it looks like it's coming along very nicely.

I'm also very interested on what you find out with the rings, sounds interesting and very useful info, I could have used it a few times myself. Definitely keep us posted on your findings.


Thanks 82gl4

I figured the problems I’m experiencing aren’t unique to me, I’m sure someone out there has put a used engine in their car only to find the rings don’t seat, it has a misfire, burns oil or what ever.

30 years ago, Chevy Vega’s were my thing, I can tell you, more than once I did an engine swap, only to find something wasn’t working like it was supposed to. that engine was an aluminum nightmare

This thread is to document my progress, my problems and the solutions we came up with to fix those problems, it’s helping me, and hopefully it will help someone else.

This is far from over, there’s going to be all sorts of mods to this car over time, as money allows




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