Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Questions: Transverse Link (rear bushing)


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Steves72

Steves72

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 140 posts
  • SE PA

Posted 16 October 2011 - 11:34 AM

I have to replace it on a 2000 Outback Limited wagon. I noticed it dripping clearish grease while replacing the right axle yesterday.

Question One: Does the arm have to be removed from the car to replace the part? It seems to me that the two bolts holding the rear of the arm could be removed; remove the nut that retains the bushing; pry down the transverse link just enough to remove the bushing; remove and replace. If I can get away with this I can probably save myself the cost of an alignment.

Or, am I just being too cheap? Drop the link, do the job, and take it in for alignment.

Question two: I have not been able to find this part available as a counter replacement item. Is this a dealer only part? The dealer quoted it at $126 or so. I have the amount in the car not in front of me as I type out this out.

Steve

#2 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Sooberoo

  • Members
  • 12,128 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 16 October 2011 - 12:28 PM

Pretty much a dealer only part. You can get a polyurethane replacement bushing insert, but those things are hard as rocks from what I hear. You might be able to get a better price by ordering online. Or get a quote from an online dealer and ask your local dealer to match it.

Replacement is fairly straightforward, it can be done as you described and no alignment is necessary afterward.
The nut holding it to the control arm is extremely TIGHT though. You'll need a breaker bar and 1/2" drive socket, and maybe a cheater pipe to get that thing loose. Impact wrench is the easy way out on this if you can get the arm pulled down far enough to get room for it.

#3 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 5,229 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 16 October 2011 - 07:41 PM

It seems I recall seeing a TSB for that bushing, saying that small amount of grease leaking was not an issue for concern on that year. But that was some years back I think I read that and it has gotten fuzzy.

#4 Steves72

Steves72

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 140 posts
  • SE PA

Posted 24 October 2011 - 09:08 PM

Followup: This had to be the easiest job I have ever done to the car. I should note that I was working on a lift with air and a 1/2" impact gun. The nut holding the bearing to the transverse link could not be hit with the impact gun but a 24" breaker bar made removal fairly easy. The impact gun made short work of the two bolts that held the bearing to the frame. Removed old, installed new.

I was off the lift in 30 minutes and could have been done in half that if I had rushed through it.

Steve

#5 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Sooberoo

  • Members
  • 12,128 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 24 October 2011 - 10:13 PM

:drunk: Here's to a job well did!
Yeah this is one of the easier repairs on a Subaru., assuming you don't live in the rust belt.
I did one on my sedan, with the help of a mega high power impact wrench (some kind of Mac Tools wrench) that belongs to one of the techs at work, had it done in probably 10 minutes.

#6 bluedotsnow

bluedotsnow

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 341 posts
  • Kirkwood, CA

Posted 04 October 2012 - 12:24 AM

whats the difference between a little and a lot of grease coming out of the link? mine has been oozing and getting worse over several months there can only be so much grease keeping the weather out.

#7 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Sooberoo

  • Members
  • 12,128 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 04 October 2012 - 01:42 AM

The grease has nothing to do with "keeping the weather out". The silicone grease is the damper that helps prevent movement of the inner part of the bushing. The design absorbs shock better than a solid rubber bushing, with less motion to boot. But, Once the grease leaks out the bushing can wobble an move around all over the place, and the control arm moves with it. This means the whole wheel moves too. Makes for a fun ride at highway speeds, borderline dangerous hard breaking, and even some torque steer if you accelerate quickly enough.
Just replaced the one on the drivers side on my car. Had been leaking for several months and the clunking and weaving around (tram lining) at higher speeds are certainly not missed.

#8 bluedotsnow

bluedotsnow

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 341 posts
  • Kirkwood, CA

Posted 05 October 2012 - 12:42 AM

thanks for the info! mine is not that bad yet although I don't do to much hard driving, no torque steer yet....

#9 johnceggleston

johnceggleston

    Lite Master of the Subaru

  • Members
  • 6,712 posts
  • Virginia

Posted 05 October 2012 - 12:11 PM

something on rear of my 01 H6 squeaks, a lot when the car bounces. it is in the area of items 3, 5, 6, & 9 in the attached link.

http://opposedforces...illustration_2/

is this the same part you are talking about? easy to replace? expensive?

will marking the cam bolt position avoid having to reset the toe-in after the job?

thanks.

Edited by johnceggleston, 05 October 2012 - 12:14 PM.


#10 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Sooberoo

  • Members
  • 12,128 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:27 PM

"Transverse Link" is Subarus fancy term for Front Control Arm.
No alignment adjustments are necessary when replacing the transverse link rear bushing, although Subaru specifies 1.5mm clearance between the large washer and the housing of the bushing, set by prying the housing forward before tightening the chassis bolts.

Trailing arm or lateral link bushing replacement may require some adjustment and/or marking the cam bolts before removing.

#11 1 Lucky Texan

1 Lucky Texan

    I read a lot about Subarus

  • Members
  • 6,602 posts
  • Texas

Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:12 AM

OK, noob question. never replaced any bushings before - much less switching to poly aftermarket.

I have some Prothane replacements for the TVL bushing (front LCA, rear bushing)

It appears the original unit is designed to flex - in a rotational manner, not slip/slide. Yet, I have packets of lubricant with the prothane parts.

I assume, maybe wrongly, the lube goes in the contact area outside the new bushing/inside the mount (after I remove the old bushing's sleeve)

right?

#12 bluedotsnow

bluedotsnow

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 341 posts
  • Kirkwood, CA

Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:31 AM

I would guess that lubricant is for pressing the urethane bushings into the metal housing? if I'm understanding the aftermarket product properly this might be something you want to pay a machine shop to press in. unless you own a solid vice that can apply pressure very evenly, this I would attempt a wheel bearing not so much. :popcorn:

#13 1 Lucky Texan

1 Lucky Texan

    I read a lot about Subarus

  • Members
  • 6,602 posts
  • Texas

Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:16 AM

I would guess that lubricant is for pressing the urethane bushings into the metal housing? if I'm understanding the aftermarket product properly this might be something you want to pay a machine shop to press in. unless you own a solid vice that can apply pressure very evenly, this I would attempt a wheel bearing not so much. :popcorn:


they don't have a metal outer sleeve.(though some poly bushings do press in as you suggest) I haven't done it yet, But i expect to push the pieces in by hand. Dunno, maybe I'll have to stand on them.

Just kinda wondering about the apparent difference in 'function/application'. OEM seems to limit rotation, the prothane seems to require slippage.

just seems odd.

#14 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Sooberoo

  • Members
  • 12,128 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 06 October 2012 - 09:20 AM

polyurethane bushings are two peice, with a hollow spacer (steel sleeve) in the center that is free to move. They're done that way because its easier for the DIYer to install without needing a press or other special tools. Because of the design they have to be lubricated or the friction between the bushing and center sleeve will wear away the polyurethane.

#15 1 Lucky Texan

1 Lucky Texan

    I read a lot about Subarus

  • Members
  • 6,602 posts
  • Texas

Posted 06 October 2012 - 09:54 AM

polyurethane bushings are two peice, with a hollow spacer (steel sleeve) in the center that is free to move. They're done that way because its easier for the DIYer to install without needing a press or other special tools. Because of the design they have to be lubricated or the friction between the bushing and center sleeve will wear away the polyurethane.


yeah, that's reasonable - it just seems like they violate part of the engineering reason the bushing is there to begin with if the arm's 'freedom of travel' needs to be limited.

Oh I plan to lube the h3ll out of it - to ward off groaning or squeaking. But I never really thought about straight-up wear. It's certainly gonna be exposed to serious grime down there.

thanx

#16 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Sooberoo

  • Members
  • 12,128 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 06 October 2012 - 11:24 AM

The normal rotational movement of the arm (swinging up and down) does not matter. The bushings main job is to prevent movement of the pivot point. It allows rotational motion on one axis, but prevents motion on the other two.

The stock bushing is designed to allow flex for rotational movement but is easily damaged if not installed with the suspension in its normally loaded position. The poly bushings can be installed with the suspension in pretty much any position, and allow full rotational movement without damaging the bushing.

#17 1 Lucky Texan

1 Lucky Texan

    I read a lot about Subarus

  • Members
  • 6,602 posts
  • Texas

Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:48 AM

got one side re-worked and 'snugged' in place, the other side is cut out should go together quickly tomorrow. I have pics and notes. hoping a few little procedural tips might help the next person.

I think these fail a little early because, like the inner tripod socket boots, they are near the exhaust. 9 years isn't that bad a run, but it's only 70K miles or so.

#18 Caboobaroo

Caboobaroo

    USMB Drunk

  • Members
  • 7,076 posts
  • Oregon City

Posted 07 October 2012 - 11:41 AM

Those factory bushing are actually fluid filled and after many miles, the rubber will eventually crack and let the oil out of them. This will then cause caster changes while driving down the road as there is now less resistance so the control arm will shift around easier.


Now I have done quite a few factory replacements but there are a couple things to do to upgrade them. First off, you can buy a complete bushing in holder and install it or you can buy just a bushing and press it into the factory aluminum holder. The latter of the two doesn't really require lubing as its a pressed in bushing that has the metal insert built into the bushing but the ones with separate bushings, metal inserts and holders require lubing at least once a year to protect the bushing from tearing or making noise.

If to replace these bushings, remember to tighten the large 22mm nut with the suspension LOADED or else it can preload the bushing weird and tear it quicker.

#19 1 Lucky Texan

1 Lucky Texan

    I read a lot about Subarus

  • Members
  • 6,602 posts
  • Texas

Posted 07 October 2012 - 11:55 PM

Those factory bushing are actually fluid filled and after many miles, the rubber will eventually crack and let the oil out of them. This will then cause caster changes while driving down the road as there is now less resistance so the control arm will shift around easier.


Now I have done quite a few factory replacements but there are a couple things to do to upgrade them. First off, you can buy a complete bushing in holder and install it or you can buy just a bushing and press it into the factory aluminum holder. The latter of the two doesn't really require lubing as its a pressed in bushing that has the metal insert built into the bushing but the ones with separate bushings, metal inserts and holders require lubing at least once a year to protect the bushing from tearing or making noise.

If to replace these bushings, remember to tighten the large 22mm nut with the suspension LOADED or else it can preload the bushing weird and tear it quicker.


yeah, evidently, you are supposed to mark/align a new factory mount, and i assume a new press-in OEM-style bushing. You mark the mount-to-arm position, then make sure the new stuff gets put back on in the same orientation.

But every part of the Prothane kit seems able to rotate (indeed, it's all lubricated) so, that particular issue can be ignored.

I took notes and pictures and may write the procedure up in this or a new thread. There may be a little more NVH than before, hard to tell for certain. Honestly, I'd say it'sa dice toss on the poly bushings over springing for OEM. But, I did save some money. Basically, it's all the same removal/installation, but with the added hassle and mess of removing the old bushing from the mount. But without the need to align the new mount to the arm or measure any offset.

hope they last

#20 bluedotsnow

bluedotsnow

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 341 posts
  • Kirkwood, CA

Posted 11 October 2012 - 12:16 PM

for my money the oem seem like the bees knees, even once a year is to often to take your suspension apart just to lube one item, on a brake job maybe....

I'm really going to make a concerted effort to start pulling these from the junk yard as both myself and a friend with an 99OBS need the same bushing.

Anyone interested in buying a used set of bushings that are inspected and tested? I'm thinking $40 shipped. the picknpulls near me are full of these.

#21 1 Lucky Texan

1 Lucky Texan

    I read a lot about Subarus

  • Members
  • 6,602 posts
  • Texas

Posted 11 October 2012 - 12:45 PM

that's an excellent price.

here's my write up on the process;http://www.subaruout...03-outback.html


bottom line, unless you're doing it for motorsports reason, try to stay with OEM or you will have increased harshness/'shock' from the Prothane. dunno about any other aftermarket replacement.

#22 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 5,229 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 08 September 2015 - 05:50 PM

Caboobaroo, on 07 Oct 2012 - 12:45, said:
If to replace these bushings, remember to tighten the large 22mm nut with the suspension LOADED or else it can preload the bushing weird and tear it quicker.

Yes, I tested it out and tore mine. I had taken it off when replacing the ball joint a few years ago, and tightened them with no weight on the wheel. The grease started oozing out pretty good shortly after that. I ordered a new one but I'm worried about the nut that holds it onto the arm since all I see is a rusty looking nub with a round rusty lump on it that looks like it might be a nut.
 

Fairtax4me, on 04 Oct 2012 - 02:46, said:
The grease has nothing to do with "keeping the weather out". The silicone grease is the damper that helps prevent movement of the inner part of the bushing. The design absorbs shock better than a solid rubber bushing, with less motion to boot. But, Once the grease leaks out the bushing can wobble an move around all over the place, and the control arm moves with it. This means the whole wheel moves too. Makes for a fun ride at highway speeds, borderline dangerous hard breaking, and even some torque steer if you accelerate quickly enough.

Ahhhh that makes perfect sense to me now since my '96 Legacy started doing the tram laning a bit where it feels more like piloting a boat. And I did start noticing torque steer which I thought was really strange since I never felt it in a Subaru before.

Edited by porcupine73, 08 September 2015 - 05:51 PM.


#23 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Sooberoo

  • Members
  • 12,128 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 08 September 2015 - 06:06 PM

You don't realize how bad off they are until you remove them. You can pry them all around with a prybar and won't see hardly any movement from them. The ones on my 96 were literally falling apart.

Amazon sells those bushings for about $22 a side. Aftermarket (Febest brand) probably solid rubber, probably won't last as long as OEM, but less than 1/4 the price. Replace them every two years until the car has rusted away and you still save money.

#24 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 5,229 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 08 September 2015 - 06:38 PM

I'll have to remember Amazon for those. I just burnt the last of my Subaru Bucks ordering this one plus the sway bar link on that side is destroyed too I noticed. The hole is stretched to like twice the normal size. I think I saw RockAuto also had the Febest unit but it showed out of stock. I don't know how many more years this '96 has left, things are getting pretty darn rusty under there and the fuel tank leaks at the seam if it's more than about 1/3 full.

#25 Caboobaroo

Caboobaroo

    USMB Drunk

  • Members
  • 7,076 posts
  • Oregon City

Posted 09 September 2015 - 12:03 AM

Here's an option as well. I decided to try something on my wife's 04 Outback. I got my hands on a pair of 04 STI transverse bushings and pressed them out of the aluminum brackets. I then pressed out the Outback bushings and then pressed in the STI bushings. Group N rubber upgrade! In combo with the aluminum JDM control arms, it's pretty tight.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users