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Who here has installed a rear window in an 80-84 wagon?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 VaporTrail

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 09:05 AM

Any thoughts, best ways, etc.....

old one is already out. gasket on replacement is good shape.....

#2 northguy

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 10:14 AM

What does the face (exterior side) of the gasket look like? Does it have an insert bead, oris it solid? I would assume the latter of the two, which, if that is the case, the most important aspect of installation is to assure that the channel wherethe new glass goes is perfectly clean and free of glass and debris. Install the gasket around the new glass on a bench, run a nylon rope around the perimeter of the inside lip starting at top center and ending at bottom center. Have someone else assist you by holding the glass and gasket assembly in place (gently) as you work the lip in while sitting inside the wagon. A cotter key puller (hook tool) is helpful to pull in stubborn places like the corners. The entire pinch weld should be lubricated prior to placing the assembly on it. I find silicone spray to work the best. A few gentle taps on the glass with the flat of the hand at the end - after the lip is COMPLETELY over the edge of the pinchweld will ensure the glass and gasket is fully seated.

If you have the interlocking face bead insert, let me know and I'll do the write-up on it.

Good luck, Mick

#3 VaporTrail

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 10:31 AM

it's a GL with the chrome trim inserts in the moulding...

the donor is from a 84 GL

#4 northguy

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 11:34 AM

This application is a bit different. Again, make dead certain the gasket is clean and free of existing glass shards, debris, old glue.... If you don't do this you are risking an explosion of new glass upon installation. With the gasket clean, make sure the inside lip is in full contact all of the way around the pinchweld. If the insert bead is not removed at this time, pull it out - again, a cotter key puller (hook tool) works well to expose the edges of the bead. It should pull out pretty easily. Clean out the groove where the bead is to be reinserted. This will make the reinsertion of the bead much easier and there will be less stress on the glass later. Make sure the edges of the glass and outer and inner surfaces are free of debris, glue... clean with alch=ohol and razor blades if necessary. Lube the hell out of the gasket with silicone spray. You may want to obtain a plastic tapered stick from a glass shop to help you install the glass. Never, never make contact of steel on glass. No hook tool contact with glass. Install - set th bottom edge of the gless in place in one corner - say bottom left. Push the glass fully down into the groove and all of the way to the left. Using your plastic stick, pull the lip out as you gently push the bottom of the glass down until you come to the corner. With a bit of practice, you'll find you can glide the plastic stick betrwwen the lip of the gasket and the bottom of the glass with the stick angled out slightly, and the glass can be fed in at a smooth, steady rate. Once you reach the corner, feed the lip around the corner as you pull the top of the glass downward into the groove completely. The bottom of the glass should be all of the way in the groove with the lip around the corners and starting up both sides equally. The glass, by now, should be resting against the gasket, poised to go in completely. Next, work the gasket in up the sides, trying to be fairly even as you go. Don't get too far ahead of either side, but don't sweat it too much - 6" or so is no big deal. Just don't do one whole side and then go back for the other. Too much lateral stress on the glass. Approach the top corners in the same manner as the bottom. If they fight you too much, you can, from the inside, push the lip from top center out and feed from both directions toward the corners. Feel free to relubricate as needed. Lube is good. Once you have the glass completely inside the lip, go have a beer, I mean, you may want to buy a universal feed tool to make the insert bead easier to install. It looks like a can opener and shouldn't run much more than $10. For a beer or two, an auto glass installer should probably let you use his/hers. Start the tool at bottom center, moving in one direction (again, with a lot of lube) and feeding the insert behind as you run the entire perimeter of the glass, ending back at the bottom center. The chrome clip that goes over the ends of the insert bead is easiest installed by putting it on the end of the bead, and using the hook tool to install the last 2" of insert into the gasket. Once in, use the hook tool to slide the chrome trim piece over the other end of the bead.

If you can't obtain a feed tool, you can use your plastic stick and/or hook tool to put the insert bead in. Just feed the lip of the bead into the gasket one side and then use the tool of choice to pry the other side of the gasket over the top of the bead.

If you are afraid of leaks, you may want to seal the gasket to glass with a very thin bead of urethane sealant before you reinstall the bead. Put the tip of the sealant tube in a vise and crush it flat, insert it between the glass and gasket as you circle the perimeter, squeezing a meager amount to seal the glass. Be careful this stuff is messy and hard to clean. It does not wash out of clothes and won't wash off of skin very well, either.

Sorry this is so long.

#5 northguy

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 12:34 PM

Mick, if you can't get ahold of a plastic stick and/or a feed tool for the insert bead, let me know. I'll mail you mine and you can keep them. I have several.

#6 VaporTrail

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 12:39 PM

so not the same way as a windshield then? because that was

trim into gasket.
gasket on glass.
rope around outside of gasket, and pull as installed (like how you describe the first one....)

my replacement window still has good gasket and trim on it...

#7 northguy

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 01:02 PM

You can try it that way, but the tension on the gasket may have a tendency to pull and release the trim in the process. The gasket isn't as tough as the "1 piece" types without the insert spline. It might work. I've never installed one that way, though. Probably because I have the tools to do it the other way. The second option is a one man job, and the former requires 2. Either way, good luck.

#8 Qman

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 04:58 PM

I have done the rear wagon before. I used the string method and it worked quite well. I found that it is much easier to have an assistant when doing it though. Same installation instructions but using a string around the bead of the gasket. Have your assistant apply light pressure from the outside.

#9 Sweet82

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 06:12 PM

I did my Trooper!....it was simple.

I watched the guy at the Junk yard pull it out. I did the same thing in reverse.

I duct taped the window at the right level to the Trooper, so I didn't have to hold it. Put the gasket on the window. Pushed the window into a corner to start. Got a wide flat blade screwdriver and gently lifted/pulled the gasket inside the frame.

Did it with one person in 5 minutes on a back vertical window.

Maybe I got lucky or maybe its easy but I thought it was simple.

For what its worth,
Glenn
88 Trooper,
91 Trooper,
And the Subies....

#10 VaporTrail

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Posted 17 March 2004 - 10:47 PM

flat blades is how Shawn and I got the donor out, and how I got the original one out....

I tried to convince my wife to help me, but she doesn't think it's something a husban/wife team should tackle, for fear of doing something wrong.....

#11 VaporTrail

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 02:40 AM

it's done. solo. I opened the hatch all the way, and started with the top of the window which was down at that point. used the rope trick first, but when I got to the bottom of the window (highest in the air) it was working as well for me, so I pulled it out, and flat bladed it the rest of the way. pretty slick. once the lip was over the edge of the final piece, then I closed the gate, and pressed the window down to fully seat it. only had one corner piece come out, and it went back in easily...

the old glass had huge areas of the defroster wires rubbed off, and this window from the back of a 84 turbo wagon looks to have all perfect lines :)

#12 eyesore

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 04:32 AM

I was gonna offer to come down and give you a hand tomorrow, but you went and did it yourself. ;)
You know, if you need an extra pair of hands in the future, feel free to give me a holler. (might not have the knowledge, but I'm good for grunt work.:-p )

#13 ShawnW

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 09:20 AM

Cool, another 84 Turbowagon part lives another day!

Mick if you didnt break the old one I might just put it back in the turbowagon so it doesnt look like a junk car. Ill be in town on Saturday if you could stash it outside somewhere Ill at least junk it for ya.

#14 northguy

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 09:58 AM

Junking it is no problem: just tap it on the edge with a hammer, sweep up the mess and toss it in the trashcan.

#15 VaporTrail

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 11:10 AM

actually Shawn, it has the lift supports, the glass, the gate trim panel (but that will be replaced as soon as I find a blue one...)

I'll sit the old glass out on the deck by the side door. will keep the trim off it just in case....

do you want the old lift supports?

#16 subiemech85

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Posted 18 March 2004 - 11:18 AM

I was going to offer to help if needed, good thing you had no trouble:cool:
BTW much closer than eyesore, and has more tools in the shop:brow:




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