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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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legacy 4eat to 5spd D/R swap


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17 replies to this topic

#1 Numbchux

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 02:21 AM

I wouldn't worry about the gauges. Just leave the auto indicators there, they'll just be off.

You'll need some custom work on the crossmember. And have the driveshaft modified. Some experimenting with shift linkage/mounting.

Axles. Either '93-'94 5MT FWD Impreza axles, custom homemade hybrid axles, or put 25 spline stubs in your trans (If you're not afraid to split the trans, this is probably the best option. LMK if you need a pair, I probably have 6 or 8 5MT 25-spline front stubs lying around).

Yep, pedal box from a cable-clutch 5MT EJ car.

Rear diff. Don't know what year legacy you're dealing with. First gen's should all have female splines on the inner DOJs for the rear axles (easy to tell, just look if there's springpins or not), these will make the EA82 diff a bolt-on thing. Otherwise you may want to grab a 3.9 rear diff from an EJ car to simplify axles.

#2 Markus56

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 12:56 PM

its a 91 legacy. should make it a bit easier then.

#3 WoodsWagon

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 12:29 AM

Honestly the 4eat is better for wheeling with than a d/r 5mt. Just build a good skid plate for the transmission pan and have at it.

If you end up running way bigger tires, 4.44 4eats and matching TCU's are pretty easy to come by in late 90's outbacks.

Slipping the torque converter rather than burning up a clutch makes wheeling tight spots a lot easier.

#4 Markus56

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 08:25 AM

I'm gonna argue with you on that one. The D/R is a much better trans for wheeling. my 85 wagon is MUCH more capable than my legacy right now. they have the same lift and the GL has bigger tires. Now, having a D/R automatic would be a cool idea...

#5 WoodsWagon

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 11:53 PM

Have you done the 4x4 lock switch mod to your legacy? What final drive ratio does it have?

Edited by WoodsWagon, 11 July 2012 - 11:58 PM.


#6 spitfire

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 07:15 AM

To Woods Wagon - I'm new to this forum but I have placed a reply in connection with one of your earlier threads "What is the best year for a 2.2" which I would like you to comment on if at all possible Thankyou.

#7 Markus56

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 05:02 AM

Yes, it has the lock switch. and it has 4.11 gears

#8 WoodsWagon

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 09:02 PM

So whats the main complaint with it offroad?

#9 Markus56

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:58 AM

my complaint is automatics suck with big tires :rolleyes:

I've already cooked one tranny in this car, and the replacement is starting to go tits up

heres a picture of the car btw

Posted Image

#10 WoodsWagon

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 02:51 AM

How does it suck? Can it not pull itself over obstacles, does the engine power out on steep climbs, does it shift when you don't want it to? I'm asking because I want details, not just "it sucks".

You might try an auxiliary cooler if you keep cooking them. Low speed work is going to build a lot of heat in the torque converter, but as long as that's kept under control with a good cooler, it shouldn't be any harder on the transmission.

#11 bratman18

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 04:05 AM

Yeah the general consensus about newer gen and offroad is that the autos are awesome. I have one in my Forester and it's great! I agree that a cooler might be a good upgrade. Heat is what kills automatic trannys.

#12 Markus56

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 01:25 AM

How does it suck? Can it not pull itself over obstacles, does the engine power out on steep climbs, does it shift when you don't want it to? I'm asking because I want details, not just "it sucks".

You might try an auxiliary cooler if you keep cooking them. Low speed work is going to build a lot of heat in the torque converter, but as long as that's kept under control with a good cooler, it shouldn't be any harder on the transmission.


sorry for not being specific with the details:-p

i do have a tranny cooler, mounted to the front bumper in front of the radiatior.
this one :
https://encrypted-tb...hT2TN4FRRY4GFr0
i doesnt seem to have the power to go up hills like my 85 wagon does, and when i am driving around town, i dont like how it shifts. also it has started slipping in reverse, and doesn't engage gears as quickly as the first transmission did.

my thinking is that the big tires don't go well with the shift pattern designed to run the stock tires. also, it torque binds like crazy no matter what i do.

the top two reasons are torque bind, and the dirt tracks that go up really steep longs hills that are everywhere around Havre. Back home, in Washington, my 85 wagon just climbs its way across Walker Valley ORV park, which is WAY more intense wheeling than the Montana plains can offer.


but mainly torque bind :mad:

Edited by Markus56, 31 July 2012 - 01:36 AM.


#13 Markus56

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 01:00 AM

On a kind of related note, how much taller can you make the strut block over body blocks when you have outback struts?

#14 torxxx

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:17 PM

I've 4 wheeled both autos and manuals in Subaru, Ford, Chevy, Dodge, Toyota and for the way I like to drive/play on the trails I prefer a manual. Manuals dont over heat. If your gearing is right in low, there is no slipping the clutch. I have yet to burn a clutch in the 86 lifted wagon, only clutch related failures I've had with a D/R is blowing the springs out of the clutch. I've had 2 D/R trannys fail, but they both drove to the shop and one of them is still alive. I haven't had second gear for 3 years now in it. I use 4 low 1st to 4 high 1st then 4low 3rd, requires fast hands but I'd still roll that way over a 4EAT anyday.

First D/R that died, front pinion had several teeth completely missing. 4 high was 7/8 bald (had to use low to drive it to the shop to swap trannys) 4 low had more than half the teeth gone. Low started popping 50k miles before I completely lost 4 high. When I tore it down, I was shocked that the trans even moved with the amount of metal in the bottom of the case and the lack of teeth on the driven gears.

Long live the D/R!

#15 scoobyclimbs

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 01:48 PM

Honestly the 4eat is better for wheeling with than a d/r 5mt. Just build a good skid plate for the transmission pan and have at it.

If you end up running way bigger tires, 4.44 4eats and matching TCU's are pretty easy to come by in late 90's outbacks.

Slipping the torque converter rather than burning up a clutch makes wheeling tight spots a lot easier.


I find your info hard to believe...I have wheeled my gl w/5spd d/r w/235/75r15 's and it will run circles around my lifted outback with 4eat running 215/75r15's having that low range is huge...
even my forester with 4eat would not keep up with a 5spd d/r ...all these rigs have lsd too..

#16 presslab

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 02:52 PM

The 5MT has 1.59 low range and 3.545 1st gear, for a reduction of 5.64:1.
The 4EAT has a torque converter ratio of 2.02 and a 1st gear of 2.785, for a reduction of 5.63:1.

And no clutch to burn up in the 4EAT. :-p

The GL is a lot lighter than a Forester or Outback.

#17 Markus56

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 11:43 AM

The 5MT has 1.59 low range and 3.545 1st gear, for a reduction of 5.64:1.
The 4EAT has a torque converter ratio of 2.02 and a 1st gear of 2.785, for a reduction of 5.63:1.

And no clutch to burn up in the 4EAT. :-p

The GL is a lot lighter than a Forester or Outback.


I've hit the stall on the torque converter on my legacy on hills that my wagon was able to crawl up. That and TORQUE BIND!!!!!

#18 WoodsWagon

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 12:19 AM

the top two reasons are torque bind, and the dirt tracks that go up really steep longs hills that are everywhere around Havre. Back home, in Washington, my 85 wagon just climbs its way across Walker Valley ORV park, which is WAY more intense wheeling than the Montana plains can offer.


but mainly torque bind :mad:

Torque bind isn't an issue offroad, heck the d/r 5spd is maximum torque bind when you put it in 4x4.

Your comparison between Montana and WA state wheeling is missing the altitude difference. There's an easy 20% power loss due to the thinner air, so it's going to be struggling and it's not the transmissions fault.




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