Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

overheating 97 2.2 legacy

Radiator overheating

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 22 February 2013 - 11:51 AM



Okay this is my stepdads car it is a 1997 legacy Brighton EJ22 213k
I have diagnosed the problem but I want your opinion. Here's what happened, we were driving down a dirt road that was fairly hilly and after a while the temp gauge started going up. The temp never got into the red zone so he kept driving it :rolleyes: and when we got to level ground it cooled down a little to about half. then it started fluctuating up and down, by this time we were on the highway and we had the heater on full blast so I had my window open and I could here a squeaking, like an alternator belt but slower.
The heater would cool down whenever the engine Rpms slowed but would come back when engine Rpms were brought back up around 2500 Rpms. When we finally stopped and got out and checked it out I popped the cap off of the coolant resivour and it was full, there was no bubbles with the engine running. Also I felt the radiator and over 3/4 of the rad was cold top hose was hot and the bottom was cold.
This car has always ran just a little under halfway on the temp gauge since my stepdad first got it and it looks like the original radiator. He did have it flushed a couple months ago but it didn't change where the temp gauge sat.

This is what I believe happened. I think that it has a clogged radiator and when we started going up the steep hills it over heated enough to push some of the coolant out the resivour on to the timing belt covers (there was coolant on the TB covers) and some of it got on the timing belt making the water pump slip until we stopped and let it dry out.

I think we should change the radiator, coolant, oil, and inspect the timing belt/water pump. What do you think?

#2 ocei77

ocei77

    Eat, Live, Breath Subaru

  • Members
  • 488 posts
  • Monticello,NY

Posted 22 February 2013 - 02:32 PM

When was the water pump last replaced?

Thermostat?

T belt and idlers?

Upper hot and cold lower sounds (in this case) more like a sticking thermo or water pump starting to fail.

Mileage?

 

O.



#3 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 22 February 2013 - 02:42 PM

Timing belt/water pump change is unknown. But I do know that the water pump is not leaking and since after it cooled off it started working again its not a spun impeller. The heat never shut off completely like a thermostat issue it actually was working well.
Mileage 213,000 give or take a few hundred miles.
IIRC Water pumps usually fail in two ways, they either leak or they spin the impeller.
Edit: also the differance in temps between hoses suggest a low flow problem that could be caused by multiple things. I believe it was caused by antifreeze contamination on the TB making it slip

Edited by mikaleda, 22 February 2013 - 02:45 PM.


#4 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 22 February 2013 - 02:49 PM

Another thing I forgot to mention is I did inspect the timing belt a few months ago and it did look fairly new. If it was changed on schedual it should be about halfway through its life

#5 edrach

edrach

    RIP 6/28/14

  • Members
  • 12,326 posts
  • Bothell, WA

Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:36 PM

Take it out on the highway. The faster you go the warmer the engine gets.  Cools right down as you slow down.  Classic symptoms for a faulty radiator.  With that mileage I'd replace the radiator first.  Easy to do yourself and only about $100 for the radiator.  After that you can look for other more expensive reasons, but I'd bet you'll have resolved the problem.


Edited by edrach, 22 February 2013 - 09:37 PM.


#6 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:42 PM

Take it out on the highway. The faster you go the warmer the engine gets.  Cools right down as you slow down.  Classic symptoms for a faulty radiator.  With that mileage I'd replace the radiator first.  Easy to do yourself and only about $100 for the radiator.  After that you can look for other more expensive reasons, but I'd bet you'll have resolved the problem.


That's exactly what I thought

#7 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Su bah roo'n

  • Gold Subscribers
  • 9,085 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:16 PM

The heater core is part of the bypass route on these which takes coolant from the crossover pipe on top of the block, through the core and then back down to the BACK side of the thermostat. When the thermostat is not open coolant is circulating through the heater core and block to prevent localized boiling of the coolant. The bypass route is also designed to bring warm coolant from the block around to the thermostat to keep it open in cold weather. With the thermostat on the inlet side of the water pump, coolant from the radiator can be cold enough to make the thermostat close, which blocks flow and causes further cooling in the radiator, while the coolant in the engine boils. The warm coolant coming through the bypass pipe is enough to keep the thermostat open.

Basically, you will still have heat even if the thermostat is closed. If you are unsure of how old the thermostat is replace it.

Edited by Fairtax4me, 23 February 2013 - 12:21 PM.


#8 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:24 PM

-

Edited by mikaleda, 23 February 2013 - 12:30 PM.


#9 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:25 PM

-

Edited by mikaleda, 23 February 2013 - 12:31 PM.


#10 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:28 PM

The heater core is part of the bypass route on these which takes coolant from the crossover pipe on top of the block, through the core and then back down to the BACK side of the thermostat. When the thermostat is not open coolant is circulating through the heater core and block to prevent localized boiling of the coolant. The bypass route is also designed to bring warm coolant from the block around to the thermostat to keep it open in cold weather. With the thermostat on the inlet side of the water pump, coolant from the radiator can be cold enough to make the thermostat close, which blocks flow and causes further cooling in the radiator, while the coolant in the engine boils. The warm coolant coming through the bypass pipe is enough to keep the thermostat open.


:confused: I'm not sure what you mean. I'm just guessing at this point but is that the reason for the fluctuation of temps after it overheated?

#11 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:29 PM

Well I'm not sure why that happened could someone please fix that^
Never mind I fixed it :dead:

Edited by mikaleda, 23 February 2013 - 12:32 PM.


#12 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:47 AM

Bump

#13 Suba_GL_87

Suba_GL_87

    Eat, Live, Breath Subaru

  • Members
  • 386 posts
  • Central Oregon, Oregonian

Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:18 PM

go to test radiator in shop. If good.
try repair new thermostat $5dollar.
 ---if still overheating
water pump is bad bearing, or timing belt systems.

head gaket but doubtfully....



#14 mikaleda

mikaleda

    legacy specialtist

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts
  • priest lake, Idaho

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:17 PM

Okay I thought I would post an update my step dad decided to drive it as long as it is working normally again :rolleyes: temp gauge still reads just below half but doesn't move on regular road driving it only seems to have a problem when it is being pushed hard. I am almost %100 sure of a bad radiator but its not my car so he is probably just going to drive it till it gives him problems again. I know it's not head gaskets yet, I know all about 2.2 head gasket leaks since I just got through this with my legacy.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Radiator, overheating

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users