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Subaru Libero -85

subaru libero subaru libero sambar columbuss subaru e10 e10

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14 replies to this topic

#1 BlackLight

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 12:38 PM

Hi all.

 

My name is Magnus and I live in the middle of Sweden.

I have a 1985 Subaru Libero (called Columbuss in scandinavia) and I'm having two major problems with it.

 

Most urgent one:

The clutch is stuck in it's pressed stage (engine and transmission not connected). This has happend before, and it's not the wire. 

It's the shaft that pivots the clutch release fork inside the bellhousing that is stuck. Last time, I sloved it by drilling a hole into the

bellhousing, heating with a welding torch and thereafter spraying penetratig oil into the hole as i rocked the release lever on the outside

until the clutch operated to satisfaction.

After that was done, I punched a grease-nipple into the hole, partly to seal the hole, but also to allow one to lube the shaft if the problem

ever were to reoccur in the future.

Now, the shaft is stuck again and it's negative degrees here (c-grade) which complicates things. I don't have access to a garage, just an

electrical socket and my toolbox.

My plan is to get a propane torch, heat the bellhousing again, rock the lever and then pump grease in through the nipple, all while the

aluminium is still hot. Repeating this a couple of times should fix the problem for a time long enough to move the car to my home (about 55 metric miles).

 

Is this a good plan?

The less-urgent one:

The car loses power at 30-40% gas, tugs and then hesitates up to speed.

I've done most checks that many experienced mechanics have come up with, but still have some things to check:

-What's the symptoms on the engines vacuum-reading if the EGR-system works improperly?

-The carburetor is a Hitachi HCK-34, a side draft type, that no one ever seem to have heard of. It seems custom built to fit just this

specific car model. Does anyone have experience of a carb that uses a twin-atmospheric pressure system?

(Pic from workshop manual available upon request.)

 

Thanks in advance.

 

//Magnus.



#2 nipper

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 08:03 PM

The clutch fork shaft may have been on its way out and finally seized.I dont know if a propane torch will have enough heat as the bell housing is a pretty big heat sink. 

 

http://www.classictr...cts/vac/uum.htm

 

http://www.ehow.com/...egr-valve_.html

 

Pic from workshop manual would be good.



#3 ferox

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 11:14 PM

Hey Magnus, you made it over here, welcome.

 

Hmmm, so the clutch fork pivot shaft actually binds the clutch fork in the compressed position?  That sounds more like the throwout bearing binding on the input shaft or  the assembly over-extending something.  Maybe I am not understanding you correctly, but it's hard to conceive that the pivot shaft for the clutch fork would bind that strongly without some other simultaneous issues there.

 

Do you think the egr valve itself is not working properly or do you think the egr system is not working properly?  Mostly a faulty egr will act as a vacuum leak.

 

I am no help on the carb, but I am interested in seeing a picture. 



#4 nipper

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 11:20 PM

Yes my first thought was a bad throw out bearing, but the heating and lubricaiting of the shaft to correct it the first time didnt seem to work with that theory. What I am a bit worried about if he damaged the clutch fork shaft or hole.



#5 ferox

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:09 AM

Yes my first thought was a bad throw out bearing, but the heating and lubricaiting of the shaft to correct it the first time didnt seem to work with that theory. What I am a bit worried about if he damaged the clutch fork shaft or hole.

Yeah, I am not sure I completely understand the situation, but I envisioned some of the penetrating oil getting on the input shaft as well as the pivot shaft in addition to some wiggling of the clutch fork that might get the TO bearing to slip back on to the input shaft.  Hard to say, but I am sure the temps make things more difficult as well.



#6 BlackLight

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:48 PM

Hi all.

Thanks for replies. I appearently don't have the pic's of the carb from the workshop manual on the web, and now I'm on my cellphones internet, so... Pic's is gonna have to wait.

 

The pivot shaft of the clutch changes a front-back action into a right-left action, since the engine is turned on it's side.

The shaft doesn't have a bearing, and thus, it rests in the bellhousing material. Because of road-salt and such, and due to the location of the shaft,

it is not impropable that rust has made it's wat into the bore, and it has finally siezed.

 

Good idea?

 

//Magnus



#7 ferox

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 08:31 PM

Hi all.

Thanks for replies. I appearently don't have the pic's of the carb from the workshop manual on the web, and now I'm on my cellphones internet, so... Pic's is gonna have to wait.

 

The pivot shaft of the clutch changes a front-back action into a right-left action, since the engine is turned on it's side.

The shaft doesn't have a bearing, and thus, it rests in the bellhousing material. Because of road-salt and such, and due to the location of the shaft,

it is not impropable that rust has made it's wat into the bore, and it has finally siezed.

 

Good idea?

 

//Magnus

So is the fulcrum of the clutch fork on a pivot shaft or some protrusion of the bellhousing aluminum or something?  Most of our Subies have a pivot ball shaft, and the clutch fork only contacts the pivot ball part of it, but it sounds like the fork you are describing has a pivot and slides back and forth on a shaft.  Is that correct?  Or is the shaft part of the fork.  Is the bore you mention part of the bellhousing or fork?



#8 BlackLight

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 06:49 AM

Uh...

I'll try and simplify this on a picture. Please don't judge my Paint-mockup... :P

t41u.png

About the carb-pics: Here you go:

 

http://imageshack.us...3/4516/lyjf.jpg
http://imageshack.us...2/6875/5zsq.jpg
http://imageshack.us...9/3523/wsrg.jpg
http://imageshack.us...1/2255/v4ty.jpg
http://imageshack.us...0/7611/84n1.jpg
http://imageshack.us...7/3569/q1t2.jpg
http://imageshack.us...1/5369/2ugj.jpg
http://imageshack.us...1/7379/jdt7.jpg
http://imageshack.us...9/2685/41bc.jpg
http://imageshack.us...43/937/xekf.jpg
 

//Magnus



#9 ferox

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 04:01 PM

That helps a lot Magnus.  So if  I am understanding correctly, the clutch fork rotates on the pivot shaft rather than sliding back and forth on it axially.  In this case I think your plan is about all you can do unless you pull the transaxle.  If you use a propane torch you shouldn't have to worry about heating the metal to the point of weakening it.  Once the weather warms up I would definitely pull the transaxle, remove the shaft and clean and lube it really good.  I use brake and caliper grease on the throw-out bearing and input shaft in case anything gets flung onto the clutch, but I think anti-seize compound would probably be best for the clutch fork shaft.  If you think the problem is rust, then you might try putting a little rust treatment in there for paint prep followed by more lube.  I think the rust treatment is typically phosphoric acid, so I wouldn't use too much but it might convert enough rust to free up the shaft for the cold season.

 

On the carburetor, I have not ever worked on an automotive twin-atmospheric system (single-barrel), but since the slow and main system both work off of one main jet but have separate air-bleed passages, my guess is that you have either blockage or vacuum leakage on the main air bleed circuit since the problem shows up at 30%-40% throttle but not at idle or low throttle.  I don't know how accessible the carb is, but I am guessing it is difficult to access.



#10 BlackLight

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 01:46 AM

Nice. I'll try and get started on the clutch ASAP today. :)

 

Carb:

Actually, the carb is quite easy to access, but not remove from the engine. Pic: http://img853.images...3/5997/sg5r.jpg
To remove the carb, I'll need either 90 deg screwdrivers, or a VERY flat 12mm wrench, The latter option also means I need to drain

the coolant from the engine (same as Justy carbs).

Gonna remove and inspect the EGR valve and try to disable it to see wether it makes a difference or not.

 

//Magnus.



#11 ferox

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 03:32 AM

It looks like you could take the top of the carb off to access the air bleeds and shoot some carb cleaner down the main air bleed passage.  Some compressed air would help too if you have access to it.  Just be careful of the float when you pull the top off.



#12 BlackLight

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 04:00 AM

Yes. Pulling the top off the carb is a dance. Removing the carb completly from the engine is another story.
I'll do what you recommend, Ferox. :)
Gonna see if I can get the car towed to a DIY garage today and start working on the clutch-problem, as this is most urgent.

 

//Magnus.



#13 BlackLight

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 02:03 PM

Hi all.

 

I got the clutch working today! :D
I tried to use the grease nipple, but it popped put under the pressure. :/ I used penetrating oil and rocked the lever back and forth until it returned by itself.

I couldn't use the propane torch, cause the DIY-garage is also a gas station (=bad...)
Anyhow, the clutch is brought back by the force of the diaphragm springs on the clutch disc cover, and the return spring outside. (Not pictured in the Paint-mock up above.)
May post a movie later with me driving for a while. ;)

Haven't been able to access the engine bay as of yet, but I will soon enough. :)



#14 BlackLight

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 11:44 AM

Well, today I disabled the EGR-valve by removing and plugging up it's vacuum hose. It didn't do anything for the engine running characteristics. :/
My plan now is just to add some gearbox fluid, and then drive home (55 metric miles), and then I'll fix up an other engine and gearbox which I have

laying around. I also have a spare clutch which I'm going to install as well.
I have a Justy that "just" needs a new (read "used") propeller shaft, then it's good to go, so I won't be Subbie-less. :P



#15 BlackLight

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 04:30 PM

Oh, and maybe this clear things up about the clutch.


 

About the engine problem.

 

As the distributor seem sensitive to moisture, I haven't been able to start it and make further tests.
 

However, as logic tests seem fruitless, I have to shoot into the dark in order to find anything that makes the problem better or worse, and

thereafter act.

The car's engine EF10 doesn't have a PCV valve as most of the other Subaru's of it's time. It has a reed valve in the valve rocker cover which

is incorporated with an oil separator, due to the fact that the cover doesn't have an inner splash plate to separate the oil from the gases and

atmosphere inside the engine.

Just a long shot, but what would happen if this reed valve failed?
The hose from the rocker cover goes directly to the dirty side of the air cleaner, and I suppose that Subaru intended to incorporate a PCV valve

instead of the current solution, though I have no idea on how to fix this without major crafting on the cover itself.

 

Ideas?

 

Oh, and happy new year! :)

//Magnus.







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