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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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Does the timing belt tensioner come with the tensioner adjuster?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 mrfixiter

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 02:15 PM

1997 Legacy GT wagon, DOHC. I had the engine die at about 75k miles 9 years ago (the car was 8 years old at the time). The mechanic who serviced the car back then didn't know how it happened but the timing belt jumped and caused valve damage. The timing belt, water pump, pulleys, etc, were replaced. Now I have 120k miles on the car and though it's way before the suggested 105k mile replacement, I was wondering if the 9 year interval meant that I should replace it again. You can see I don't put lots of miles on my car but considering the expense of having a similar failure, I'd rather do it before another failure occurs, which leads me to the topic title. I've watched lots of videos and read through many posts on how to replace the timing belt. I think I can do the job myself. In looking at the service manual, the parts blow up of the timing components show that the tensioner and the idler that sits on top of it are separate parts. If I buy a tensioner, do I also have to buy the idler separately (assuming it needs changing)? I have found some confusing results doing an internet search for "tensioner". This link http://www.autoparts...ioner-1997.html shows two possibilities. One looks like a toothed gear (not what the service manual shows) the other looks like a smooth pulley. This link, http://www.carpartsd....html?3594=2040 shows a combination of the tensioner with the idler already mounted on it and then it has them as individual parts. Can someone please help me sort this out?

 

Thanks for your reply. :)



#2 ocei77

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:41 PM

Replacement of betl etc is 10 yrs /100K mileage. Whichever comes first.

Insofar as the tensioner, is yours one or two piece?

If two piece, replace the roller only.

 

O.



#3 mrfixiter

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:55 PM

Insofar as the tensioner, is yours one or two piece?

 

I haven't begun the job yet so I don't know the answer to that. I've never come across any mention of how many pieces it is in the manual's service procedure either.

 

Thanks for your reply.



#4 Fairtax4me

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 04:01 PM

97 could have two different styles of tensioner depending on the build date. You generally have to pull the left (driver side) timing cover off and take a peek inside with a flashlight to see which kind you have.

The better style is a cylindrical tensioner about 4 inches long with a separate idler. That style is robust enough to be re-used as long as care is taken during compressing the pin so the valving inside isn't damaged.

If you have the style like this one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/360393841664 the whole tensioner assembly should be replaced with the idler. Those are not as forgiving when being re-compressed, and generally fail on their own anyway.
Order a timing kit that comes with the correct style tensioner for your car. The rest is the same, but its much cheaper to buy a whole kit with everything you need than to peice things together.
eBay has good prices on whole kits. Anywhere from $150-$200 depending on which kit you need. Be sure to get the water pump with the kit as well. If it comes with a paper gasket, toss the paper one and get a water pump gasket from the dealer. Only a few dollars and will not blow out like the paper gaskets will.

#5 mrfixiter

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 05:03 PM

I saved the old parts for many years but they finally got tossed. I think it was the cylindrical type but not sure. The service manual makes a big deal about compressing the tensioner very slowly with a vice. It also says to use a vertical vise. I do not have a vertical vice. I suppose I could lay the vice I do have on its side to reset the piston. Is this being overly cautious or must it be compressed in the vertical position?

 

Thanks for your reply



#6 Fairtax4me

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 05:11 PM

I've always done it with my 8" C clamp.
Makes it easy to feel the tension as its being compressed so you don't over-do it.
Then I use a small nail or hey key to hold the pin in once its compressed.




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