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86' Turbo injectors


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11 replies to this topic

#1 opus

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:12 PM

I think I have a leaky injector.  Start up is a puff of white gas odored smoke.  Also on a hot start it barely idles for a little bit, 450-550rpm.  Best bet is to get them cleaned somewhere or would it be as price effective to replace them?



#2 skishop69

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:01 PM

It's kind of a pain, but you can remove them with the furl rail and set them on a sheet of cardboard. This will show any leaks. Btw, you need to do this with the fuel lines attached and key it on a few times before you let them sit.



#3 opus

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 10:10 AM

OK.  Simple enough to pull injectors?



#4 jono

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 05:54 PM

you find yourself wrestling with the tension from the rubber fuel hose laterals and may need to disconnect a few of those structure to manifold hold down bolts about the place. Use a rag to soften any blows the pintle caps may suffer from said tension. I kept smacking my brittle white pintle caps against the inlet mans injector mounts as things would slip, smack and crack the caps.

 

I'd be trying a recommnded fuel add injector cleaner first. Gave same advice to a dude with a car been not run in 15 years- sorted !!



#5 djellum

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 11:45 PM

Before pulling injectors I would throw some sea foam through it and then change filters.  Injectors are rebuildable but I have never done it myself.  maybe google a bit and see if they may just need some cleaning and new orings or some such thing.

 

i seem to remember them just being 2 small screws.  easy to F up the screws or break stuff so be careful.

 

there are a few types of injectors, I cant remember what ones we have (bosch?).  anyways once you find out what style they are then there most any of that style will fit on, they just may be rated for different power outputs.  people building turbo motors used to use injectors from some fords cause they needed more fuel output.  i mention it since i seem to recall you lived in the sticks so you may not have a lot of options.



#6 opus

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 11:50 PM

Before pulling injectors I would throw some sea foam through it and then change filters. Injectors are rebuildable but I have never done it myself. maybe google a bit and see if they may just need some cleaning and new orings or some such thing.

i seem to remember them just being 2 small screws. easy to F up the screws or break stuff so be careful.

there are a few types of injectors, I cant remember what ones we have (bosch?). anyways once you find out what style they are then there most any of that style will fit on, they just may be rated for different power outputs. people building turbo motors used to use injectors from some fords cause they needed more fuel output. i mention it since i seem to recall you lived in the sticks so you may not have a lot of options.


I've done the seafoam thing.... Nothing. I'll pull them and there is an injector guy that rebuilds them and cleans them for $16ea.

#7 opus

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 03:23 PM

Good golly, they dont want you to take those injectors out, do they!  I dont see anyway to take them out without pulling a manifold bolt that holds  the pipe bracket on.  I know better than to fiddle with those manifold bolts.

 

Anyone make any modifications doing this?



#8 scoobiedubie

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:08 PM

First of all, you are guessing as to the cause of your problem.  White smoke usually comes from coolant leaking into the combustion or exhaust mixture.  That white smoke can occur to either leaky intake manifold gaskets, leaky cylinder head gaskets, a crack in the cylinder head between the intake and exhaust valves or a crack in the fin between the intake and exhaust ports on the bottom of the engine.  If the spark plugs are white, then you can rule out the crack in the fin.  In a hot start, the pressure from hot coolant was probably pumping coolant through a crack or through the cylinder head gaskets, into the combustion chamber.  If you are continually replacing coolant, then you have a coolant leak problem.

 

You do have 1 bolt on each end of the intake fuel tube network, that holds the fuel injectors in place.



#9 opus

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:34 PM

Its not coolant.  

 

The one bolt on each end seems to be a manifold bolt.  I would have thought it would just have bolted TO the manifold, instead of being a bolt that holds the manifold to the head.  I surely am not going to pull a manifold bolt.  I've done enough of those to know how it generally ends up.  If I end up having to pull injectors I'll probably cut the fuel rail tubes and replace it with rubber fuel line.

 

I'll just run more Seafoam through it for now.



#10 scoobiedubie

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 11:28 PM

The bolt that hold the fuel line supply tube rack, first goes through a standing strut/spacer/leg, then it goes into the manifold .  The manifold bolt only goes through the manifold and attaches to the cylinder head.

 

You can touch a long screwdriver to the top of the fuel injector while putting the handle to your ear, and by doing this to each injector, you can compare for any differences.

 

What does the plug color tell you?



#11 opus

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 11:34 PM

Plugs were AC Delco. One was a little rich. I put NGK in about 200 miles ago, haven't checked those yet.
No audible differences amongst them.

#12 naru

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 10:34 AM

I think I have a leaky injector.  Start up is a puff of white gas odored smoke.  Also on a hot start it barely idles for a little bit, 450-550rpm.  Best bet is to get them cleaned somewhere or would it be as price effective to replace them?

 

I would install a pressure gauge and confirm a leak before pulling injectors.

I confirmed my leaker by installing test tubes over the injectors overnight.

 

Confirm fuel pump operation while the gauge is hooked up.

Use a bicycle pump to put 7 psi(max boost) on the fuel regulator vacuum" line to force the fuel pressure to approx.42 psi.

Check the flow rate.

Many of the old turbo pumps are tired.






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