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2004 Forester rear axle bearings


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Souperoo

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Posted 24 April 2018 - 02:59 PM

From what I've read, I'm guessing mine are starting to go.  It has 200,000+ miles.

 

Is this an acceptable kit?  Funny, for another $10 you can get a new hub also.

 

https://www.rockauto...el bearing,1672

 

And do I have to take it all apart like the factory manual shows on page 2315?  I'm guessing I may have to in order to seat the new bearing into the hub.


Edited by Souperoo, 24 April 2018 - 05:52 PM.


#2 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 24 April 2018 - 04:31 PM

Junk. Get Koyo, NTN, or NSK. 

 

The bearings have to be pressed with an on-car screw press. It's not really a DIY friendly operation. 

 

GD


Edited by GeneralDisorder, 24 April 2018 - 04:33 PM.


#3 Souperoo

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 08:45 AM

Junk. Get Koyo, NTN, or NSK. 

 

The bearings have to be pressed with an on-car screw press. It's not really a DIY friendly operation. 

 

GD

Thanks.  I *thought* I saw in the manual showing the assembly out of the car and pressing the bearings in on a work bench but I don't see that now.  Still, pretty involved.  Maybe when I have a lot of time I'll check it out better.



#4 Souperoo

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 08:58 AM

Junk. Get Koyo, NTN, or NSK. 

 

The bearings have to be pressed with an on-car screw press. It's not really a DIY friendly operation. 

 

GD

 

Ah, it wasn't that hard to do with just a pulley puller and a seal and bearing seating kit from Horrible Freight.  Oh, and a big hammer. :).  But I suppose I do more than the average DIY'er.  In another car I rebuilt the automatic trans and the motor and now the rear differential.  The best part is that the Forester is now QUIET (shh quiet).  Also the originals were ball bearing and the new ones are tapered roller bearings, much much better.



#5 Mike104

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 10:44 AM

The FSM used to show a special tool set and using a press with the knuckle off the car.  There was a TSB many years ago and a specially designed tool called a Hub Shark that uses a screw press.  The main issue can be the lateral link bolt.  Sometimes it's easy (like Superoo said) and sometimes its difficult like in this video

 

http://<div style="p...</iframe></div>

 

A lift and a torch makes this job much easier.


Edited by Mike104, 15 May 2018 - 10:46 AM.


#6 Souperoo

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 11:51 AM

The FSM used to show a special tool set and using a press with the knuckle off the car.  There was a TSB many years ago and a specially designed tool called a Hub Shark that uses a screw press.  The main issue can be the lateral link bolt.  Sometimes it's easy (like Superoo said) and sometimes its difficult like in this video

 

http://<div style="p...</iframe></div>

 

A lift and a torch makes this job much easier.

 

Ah yes, THAT bolt.  I did use a breaker bar that's about 20" long.  Yes it required some force to get it to turn, the previous owner worked at a ski lodge so it got plenty of salt (most of the bolts are rusty but no rust on the body).  Anyway, it was tough but took more time to go into the garage and get the long breaker bar than to get it to turn.  From there I used the impact wrench which did nothing before the breaker bar.  A torch is on my wish list.  The video was about 45 minutes too long for me so with the new bolt, I'm guessing he cut the old one.   Over the years the best thing I ever used on rusty bolts is heat.  Get it slightly red and turn it when it's still hot and they go pretty easy.  Forget the penetrating oils like PB blaster unless heat is not an option.  Even then I've never had any luck with penetrating oil.  When the other side goes, now I know to get a new bolt just in case, but with no torch I go to the sawz-all.



#7 Mike104

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 06:34 AM

Ah yes, THAT bolt.  I did use a breaker bar that's about 20" long.  Yes it required some force to get it to turn, the previous owner worked at a ski lodge so it got plenty of salt (most of the bolts are rusty but no rust on the body).  Anyway, it was tough but took more time to go into the garage and get the long breaker bar than to get it to turn.  From there I used the impact wrench which did nothing before the breaker bar.  A torch is on my wish list.  The video was about 45 minutes too long for me so with the new bolt, I'm guessing he cut the old one.   Over the years the best thing I ever used on rusty bolts is heat.  Get it slightly red and turn it when it's still hot and they go pretty easy.  Forget the penetrating oils like PB blaster unless heat is not an option.  Even then I've never had any luck with penetrating oil.  When the other side goes, now I know to get a new bolt just in case, but with no torch I go to the sawz-all.

 

In the video he ended up using some spray lube and kept going at it for way too long with the impact.  The nut came off no problem but I couldn't budge it with my 24" breaker bar so I ended up using a cutoff wheel.  The knuckle was hosed anyway (elongated hole where lateral link bolt passed through) so I was prepared with all new parts that I used.






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