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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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Cool Tranny Flush Method


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_meep424_*

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Posted 06 January 2002 - 07:18 PM

Hey Y'all,

Check this out...found it on a minivan BBS for chryslers while doing some research. Same method applies...

Meep!

----
James Bottger wrote:

While it's much better for the transmission to change the fluid using the method in [the above] article than it is not to change the fluid at all, this method only replaces about half of the fluid in the transmission. The best thing to do is to change out ALL of the fluid, and this is also something a person can do themselves.

First, drain the fluid from the pan, just like you would using Mr. Macfairlane's procedure. Once you've replaced the filter, the pan gasket, and reinstalled the pan, you're ready for the next step.

Fill the transmission to the proper level using the proper type of transmission fluid. Then disconnect the return transmission line (the line in which transmission fluid flows from the transmission cooler back to the transmission), located near the bottom of the radiator. There's two transmission lines connected in this location, and the bottom line is usually the return line. Once the line has been disconnected, attach a clear piece of tubing to the transmission cooler, the same diameter as the transmission line, approximately 5-6 feet long, using the transmission line clamp to secure it.

Place the unattached end of the clear tube in a plastic, one gallon milk container and place it where it can be seen (like not under the car).

For the next portion of the procedure, make sure that the parking brake is set prior to continuing. Start the engine. The transmission may have to be put into

#2 Guest_Legacy777_*

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Posted 06 January 2002 - 07:26 PM

meep some of it got cut off......seems like a decent idea.....

#3 Guest_meep424_*

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Posted 06 January 2002 - 07:32 PM

Part II: (somehow it cut off part of the paste...)

...For the next portion of the procedure, make sure that the parking brake is set prior to continuing. Start the engine. The transmission may have to be put into "Neutral" or "Drive" in order to pump the fluid from the transmission. I usually put mine in "Neutral" to accomplish this step. While the transmission is pumping out fluid, you can monitor approximately how
much fluid has been pumped out by looking at how much fluid has been pumped into the plastic milk jug. While fluid is being pumped out, slowly add new
fluid to the transmission at about the same rate as its being pumped out. This keeps the fluid level at, or near the proper level. You can see the condition of the fluid through the clear tubing as its being pumped out.
After approximately 4 to 5 quarts (obviously, if it's more than 4 quarts, you'll have to turn of the engine, and fetch another milk jug) of fluid have been pumped out, you should notice a change in the color of the fluid. It
should go from a brownish red color, to a bright pinkish red color. When this happens, all of the old fluid has been replaced with new fluid. Be careful not to overfill the tranny during this procedure.

When completed, reconnect the transmission return line to the transmission cooler. Check the fluid level as you normally would, and add fluid as required. This fluid change method is twice as good for your transmission as the method of only changing out half of the fluid is.

Happy shifting!

#4 Guest_Suzam_*

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Posted 06 January 2002 - 09:04 PM

I have done this before and it works like a charm. Saves me from draining out the torque converter. You should also pass through all the gears on the transmission by shifting into 1st, 2nd, 3rd, drive and reverse (KEEP YOUR FOOT ON THE BRAKES) for a few second in each gear, to cleanout the valve body. There are valves and check balls inside can keep fluid from passing through the chambers.


DON'T FORGET TO RECYCLE THAT OLD FLUID!!!

#5 Guest_SmashPDX_*

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Posted 06 January 2002 - 11:04 PM

Remind me to archive this?

#6 Guest_shortlid_*

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Posted 06 January 2002 - 11:14 PM

Is there a actual drain for the torque converter??

#7 Guest_Legacy777_*

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Posted 06 January 2002 - 11:33 PM

no....no drain for the torque converter....the fluid is suspended inside of it....only way to get fluid out is to take it apart.

#8 Guest_Bagheera85_*

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Posted 07 January 2002 - 03:42 AM

While we are on the subject..
How do you put fluid into the auto tranny? Cuz my fluid check/fill tube is buried way in the back, UNDERNEATH the darn intercooler. I used a funnel, but it was a pain and I had to wedge it in back there. I assume maybe some tubing, a funnel, and something to connect the tubing to the fill tube would work?

And I just copied and pasted that to my new website.. :)

#9 Guest_jamest46_*

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Posted 07 January 2002 - 01:26 PM

Just for future information regarding tranny fluid on the MY2002's.
On the MY 2002's there is a external filter. I just spoke to a mechanic at the dealership. It is a nonservicable filter. This was put on in addition to the internal screen. In this model year you only drain and fill......you don't drop the pan, change filters.....nothing but drain and fill. I will do this more often...like once a year as I put about 16,000/year on the car. Since it takes only about 4 quarts......seems like good cheap insurance.
I have done the drain procedure described above on my '95 Dodge diesel....works great like you said. Any thoughts from you guys on synthetic vs conventional fluid?

Jim

#10 Guest_Legacy777_*

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Posted 07 January 2002 - 02:15 PM

Mitchell.....gotta add fluid through the dipstick hole....it's a pain in the arse...but that's what you gotta do.

As far as the external filter.....it's probably like the ones on the early legacies.....I wouldn't worry about till 75,000-100,000 miles. Unless you find that your tranny fluid is getting pretty nasty.




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