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Help with cam seal, crank seal, water pump & oil pump service on 96 2.2 Legacy Sedan


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14 replies to this topic

#1 johndub

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 02:48 PM

I am new to the board here but I have a 96 Subaru Legacy 2.2 Liter sedan with the infamous oil leak from the front timing cover. I am planning on pulling the timing cover off this weekend to determine if the oil is coming form the cam seals, crank seal or both. I am considering doing the work myself. I have subscribed to the Alldata service and the repair looks time consuming but not too difficult.

I am planning to replace the cam seals, crank seal, water pump and timing belt while I am in there. The one question I have is, should I also replace the oil pump while I have the whole thing apart? I replaced the water pump & timing belt at 60K and it has about 110k on it now. I wish I would have known about the seal issues and I would have done them at that time but i didn't know it was a problem. Is the oil pump a problem item that will need to be replaced in the near future?

I would also like to know if someone can tell me if there are any special tools needed for this job. It looks like you need a special wrench for the cam and the crank pulley looks tricky. Can anyone offer some advice?

The idea of spending $500+ on labor is really killing me when I think I can do the work myself.

Any help would be appreciated.

#2 Gnuman

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 03:09 PM

I am new to the board here but I have a 96 Subaru Legacy 2.2 Liter sedan with the infamous oil leak from the front timing cover. I am planning on pulling the timing cover off this weekend to determine if the oil is coming form the cam seals, crank seal or both. I am considering doing the work myself. I have subscribed to the Alldata service and the repair looks time consuming but not too difficult.

I am planning to replace the cam seals, crank seal, water pump and timing belt while I am in there. The one question I have is, should I also replace the oil pump while I have the whole thing apart? I replaced the water pump & timing belt at 60K and it has about 110k on it now. I wish I would have known about the seal issues and I would have done them at that time but i didn't know it was a problem. Is the oil pump a problem item that will need to be replaced in the near future?

I would also like to know if someone can tell me if there are any special tools needed for this job. It looks like you need a special wrench for the cam and the crank pulley looks tricky. Can anyone offer some advice?

The idea of spending $500+ on labor is really killing me when I think I can do the work myself.

Any help would be appreciated.


The back of the oil pump has a few screws that seal the unit. these loosen over time and need to be tightened. Also replace the O rings on the oil pump as well, while you have it off. This is a common source of leaks.

#3 coloradosubarules

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 04:54 PM

I did the oil seal on my 90 legacy 2.2 not too long ago.

Change O-ring on the back of the pump
Use Ultra Grey (permatex) on the pump housing
Tighten the screws on the back of the pil pump (you will see them when you have them off.
Torque the oil pump to spec
Replace the oil pump/crank seal on the front of the pump
I don't know how many miles you have on your 96 but I would suggest doing the water pump and timing belt while you have it off.

Once you have those taken care of....drive on for another 60K miles.

#4 rweddy

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 04:56 PM

I am new to the board here but I have a 96 Subaru Legacy 2.2 Liter sedan with the infamous oil leak from the front timing cover. I am planning on pulling the timing cover off this weekend to determine if the oil is coming form the cam seals, crank seal or both. I am considering doing the work myself. I have subscribed to the Alldata service and the repair looks time consuming but not too difficult.

I am planning to replace the cam seals, crank seal, water pump and timing belt while I am in there. The one question I have is, should I also replace the oil pump while I have the whole thing apart? I replaced the water pump & timing belt at 60K and it has about 110k on it now. I wish I would have known about the seal issues and I would have done them at that time but i didn't know it was a problem. Is the oil pump a problem item that will need to be replaced in the near future?

I would also like to know if someone can tell me if there are any special tools needed for this job. It looks like you need a special wrench for the cam and the crank pulley looks tricky. Can anyone offer some advice?

The idea of spending $500+ on labor is really killing me when I think I can do the work myself.

Any help would be appreciated.

I am getting ready to do this myself.

I have read that you loosen the bolts with the timing belt on, then use a standard puller to pull them off.

#5 roger1

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 09:36 PM

The biggest problem for me was loosening The stud for the cranksahft pully. I bought a chain wrench that helped alot. It knicked the pulley and I filed off the burrs. Tightening it I put a piece of webbing to prevent that. Other folks put socket and breaker bar on and hit the starter momentary to "crack" it loose. If you have a remote starter that would make it easier for me. Put on new belt and note marks for the timing on belts. (At least on OEM ones) If after market one don't have marks ,pass, because it so much earier withe marks. All of previous post had good advise. my .02 cents

#6 frag

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 10:42 AM

The back of the oil pump has a few screws that seal the unit. these loosen over time and need to be tightened. Also replace the O rings on the oil pump as well, while you have it off. This is a common source of leaks.


Dont forget to put Locktite on the small screws before tightening them. If not they'll back out again sooner or later.

#7 lmdew

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 11:12 AM

Crank pulley Torque should be 125 ftlbs. Most manuals list 90 which is too low.

#8 Nug

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 07:36 PM

Crank pulley Torque should be 125 ftlbs. Most manuals list 90 which is too low.


What he said.

#9 Legacy777

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 09:29 AM

here's some pics from my timing belt job

http://www.main.expe...ages/timingbelt

#10 bearbalu

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 08:26 PM

Folks tend to reseal the oil pump instead of replacing it.

#11 SevenSisters

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 08:42 PM

Is there normal wear that makes replacement of the oil pump necessary at some point and how do you tell?

If it ever gets warmer, I need to do the timing belt too.

#12 coloradosubarules

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 10:58 PM

I would replace my loil pump when I have oil pressure issues. So far, so good.

#13 BigMattyD

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 11:01 PM

I am the proud owner of a 96 Legacy with 115,000 miles, and I am 3/4 of the way through the same project. Here are some highlights:

1. The crankshaft pulley was bonded tightly to the crankshaft. I used PB Blaster, knocked on it a bit with a hammer, tried a puller, which broke a tiny piece of the pulley off (about 2mm of the rearmost rib of the pulley,) heated the center of the pulley with a torch because it is below zero here, tried prying with various tools, and finally had the most luck wedging a box end wrench between the pulley and the timing belt cover. I got the pulley off, but
I cracked the center portion of the cover. Luckily, I have a local junk shop that specializes in Subarus, so he found me a replacement cover for only 15 bucks.

2. The camshaft seals were not leaking, but based on the recommendations of this group, I decided to change them anyway. About 15 minutes into trying to remove the first seal, I wished I had left them alone. I had successfully damaged the seal beyond usefulness, but it did not want to budge. I used various implements, including some old surplus surgical tools that I had found. I was about ready to give up, so I came inside and read a few of these posts, and prepared for the second round. With patience, persistence, sweat, and some strong language, I was able to coax the first seal out and replace it without causing any damage that I could see. I was hesitant to try the second seal, but I went for it, and it turned out to be a little easier. I found that if i used a small screwdriver to pry the edges of the seal away from the shaft and the seal fitting, I could lubricate the seal with a little penetrating oil, then it was a matter of coaxing the seal out slowly until it was out far enough to get some leverage with a bigger screwdriver. Once it has come out far enough that 1 to 2 mm are protruding from the engine surface, it is easy. It is those first few mm's that are frustrating.

3. After removing the oil pump, I found that everything was healthy. The backing plate screws were secure, there was a good o-ring, which I replaced anyway, and I was surprised to see how clean the inside of the pump and engine were. When I removed the crankshaft oil seal, I found it had two small cracks in it. It wasn't leaking yet, but I am glad I fixed it before a chunk broke or the cracks worsened.

4. I replaced the water pump, thermostat, gaskets, and hoses, all of which seemed ok, but I knew they were old and weren't too expensive. By the way, I have a used but fully functional water pump that I'd be willing to give to anyone who wants it, just pay for shipping..

5. Unfortunately, one of the smooth idlers is in need of replacement. Just waiting for the part before I can finish. Why are they so expensive?? Luckily, I am getting an new OEM part at a good discount.


The posts on this board were extremely helpful. I knew just what I was getting into, and with the exceptions of the few problems I noted, everything has gone very smoothly.

Thanks to everyone on this board who gave their advice and esp. all the photos.

Matt


P.S. Will the small notch broken out of the back of the pulley do any harm? I can post a pic if anyone wants to see it.

#14 BigMattyD

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 11:14 PM

About Special Tools:


A 22mm socket for the crankshaft bolt, a rubber strap wrench to hold the cam sprockets when loosening or tightening the bolts (cheap at sears.)

I have a manual trans. so to break the crank bolt loose, I just put the car in 5th and put on the E-brake and went to town with a breaker bar and 22 mm socket. Very easy, actually.

You need a vise or c-clamp to recompress the belt tensioner.

A torque wrench and a modest set of metric sockets and extensions, a few screwdrivers, some rags, etc. are all that I've needed. The socket sizes range from 10 to 17mm, with the exception of the crank bolt.

Since I was changing the water pump and hoses, I decided to remove the radiator, although I guess it isn't really necessary. There are only 2 bolts holding it in place.

Pretty easy for the most part, just a lot of steps, nothing too mind-boggling.

#15 Nug

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 08:45 AM

I'd just take a small file and knock any sharp edges off of that crack. I wouldn't worry about it.The way I did cam seals was to take a very small drillbit and a cordless drill, and drill a small hole in the face of the seal. You need to hit the metal part of the seal. A small wood screw can be threaded in, and then you can pull and pry on the screw with a pair of channel locks. Works great.




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