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Driveshaft Question


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21 replies to this topic

#1 Wasteland

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 11:57 PM

I did a search but didn't find what I was looking for. Is the driveshaft from an EA81 AT tranny the same length as an EA81 MT? I'm putting the drive train(4spd D/R) from a hatch into a wagon(AT3) and need to know if the wagons shaft will work.

#2 Ross

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 12:43 AM

I did a search but didn't find what I was looking for. Is the driveshaft from an EA81 AT tranny the same length as an EA81 MT? I'm putting the drive train(4spd D/R) from a hatch into a wagon(AT3) and need to know if the wagons shaft will work.


Yes, they are exactly the same. I am using a 3at one my 4 DR ea81t.

#3 Wasteland

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 02:05 AM

Rad! thanks for the info

#4 torxxx

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 08:35 AM

thats cool that they swap out. EA82's are different sizes auto to manual

#5 jeffroid

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 09:16 AM

What about putting a Dual range five speed from an EA82 into an EA81t? Will the drive shaft from the EA81t work?

#6 northguy

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 09:48 AM

What about putting a Dual range five speed from an EA82 into an EA81t? Will the drive shaft from the EA81t work?


I took an EA82 shaft in to have it mdified into a solid shaft and was told it wouldn't work as the diameter of the front piece and back piece are different. The ea 82 is already 51" long between the 2 knuckles, so it is probably a different length than an ea 81.

#7 Craven

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 10:32 AM

What about putting a Dual range five speed from an EA82 into an EA81t? Will the drive shaft from the EA81t work?

No, The 4sp D/R trans. is longer than the ea82 5sp d/r trans. So the ea81 driveshaft is shorter than a ea82.

#8 jeffroid

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 11:52 AM

I guess I have to apologize for hijacking this thread, but while I have the floor . . .

OK, I gather I can't use my EA81t driveshaft with a 5speed DR in my '84 turbo wagon. Do all EA82 wagons have the two piece driveshaft with the carrier bearing? If so, that means I'll either have to use the two piece set up and weld in the carrier bearing, or take my EA81t driveshaft to a shop and get it lengthened, correct? The second option sounds easier since I don't have a welder. But now that I think about it, if I use the EA82 driveshafts, will I have to do both - install the carrier bearing AND modifiy the length of one of the driveshafts?

#9 MilesFox

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 12:29 PM

if you put 5spds in an ea81, use the ea82 5spd 2-piece driveshaft as it will be the proper length for that tranny

you will have to make a carrier bearing mount, the carrier will mount in the same location on the ea82 body as it does on an ea82. i found this out by making a carrier mmount for 5spd in a 2wd ea81, and the same mount carried over and fit the same in an ea82 2wd to 4wd conversion

get a 12" length of flat steel, about 2 in wide. make 2 holes 10" apart on-center to the 12" pice.

get another flat piece of steel about 1 in wide, make 2 4" lenghts and drill holes on the last inch of them. bolt the short pieces to the carrier bearing. you will notice the carrier tab on one side is higer than the other, so put ne piece on top of one side and one on the bottom of the other side so they are even. wels this assembly to the 12" piece. these pieces once bolted to the carrier bearing will be 6" apart on-center to the main piece. weld them to the top side as it will be within the tranny tunnel, the outer ends of the main piece will fit flat against the body under the floor, just before the tranny tunnel curves up

with the mounts bolted to the carrier, install the driveshaft and butt it against the body of the car, drill through the holes thru the floor and install the bolts!

the bolts will come through aright in the corner of the tranny tunnel and the rail perpendicilar to the car under the seats. use a 1 1/2" washer insid ethe car as it will squish down and hold the bolt head still, so you can torque it down

this design is very simple and will fit exactly the same on bioth ea81 and ea82 bodies.

the first one i made for an ea81 and the same part fit on jims 88 dl wagon

i amde another one to the described dimensions and it fit on alleyboy's 2wd touring wagon

very simple the first one was eyeballed and the 2nd one was to the dimensions. they both fit the same and these dimensions are easy to make and fit, if you have a welder, a hacksaw, and a drill. the steel you can find at a hardware store for both pieces you shouldnt have more than 15 bucks in metal

another note, the ea82 at and 5spd driveshafts are different lenghts. it is the fron thalf from the tranny to the carrier that are different lengths according to each tranny. the carrier between both will be in the same location relative to the car

the rear half is the same length between both, so if you ever had a bad u-joint you can replace the rear half from ANY 4wd ea82

#10 jeffroid

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 06:26 PM

Thanks very much for the help, man, I really appreciate it. I was having a little trouble following along, but I'm sure I'll be able to figure it out when I get the parts in hand and crawl under there and take a look. I've got full access to a machine shop at work, which will definitely help.

I'm not going to be doing this for a while. Right now I'm still tormenting myself trying to figure out exactly what to do with this turbo wagon. Regardless, the engine has to come out, and while it's out, the auto tranny will be replaced with a five speed and I'm just trying to make sure I get all the parts lined up.

I don't have an EA82 to crawl under anymore since I traded my '88 GL-10 to Northwet for "future considerations". One thing I don't understand is how the carrier bearing is attached to the car. Is it a bearing housed in a bolt-on bracket, or is the housing welded on to the car such that I'll have to cut it off?

Thanks again.

#11 ShawnW

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 11:42 PM

Mounting the carrier bearing mount isn't perfectly easy. It has to be perfectly mounted or it will wobble and you will get vibration in your steering wheel or body. I highly recommend the 1 piece route. Its not a matter of the lack of welder either you have to have the shaft balanced anyway.

#12 jeffroid

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 12:28 AM

Well, I feel bad about starting an argument between veterans, especially after hijacking this thread. I would tend to agree with Shawn, not only in regards to balancing and vibration problems, but because the carrier bearing is just one more thing to go wrong, especially if it's improperly installed and subjected to side loads.

On the other hand, if I don't go two piece, I'll have to find a shop that can lengthen and balance my driveshaft, right? Do any of you Western Washingtoniers have a shop you could recommend to perform such a function and a SWAG as to how much it would cost?

I'm guessing a couple hundred bucks at least, which would, well, SUCK ! ! !

#13 Craven

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 08:45 AM

Mounting the carrier bearing mount isn't perfectly easy. It has to be perfectly mounted or it will wobble and you will get vibration in your steering wheel or body. I highly recommend the 1 piece route. Its not a matter of the lack of welder either you have to have the shaft balanced anyway.

Shawn
What do you mean by Perfectly mounted, up, down, left or right or what?
Craven

#14 jeffroid

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 09:36 AM

Well, here I go answering for someone else. I’m not a mechanic or an automotive engineer, but I will presume that the carrier bearing should be mounted so that the circular plane of the bearing is normal or perpendicular to the centerline of the car in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In other words, the bearing should not be “leaning” forward or backwards, or “tilted” to the left or right. It should also not be mislocated left to right or front or back. Again, I don’t have an EA82 to crawl under any more so I don’t know if the front shaft is constrained at the tranny or if it slips in, but for the rear shaft, if the bearing is mislocated up or down, I would guess it will put an axial load on the bearing, similar to mislocating it front to back.



Any of these conditions will have a tendency to wear out the bearing prematurely. This is relative, of course. We are not building a watch here, and I will not attempt to guess at what acceptable tolerances would be for the location of the bearing placement.

#15 Craven

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 10:44 AM

Well, here I go answering for someone else. I’m not a mechanic or an automotive engineer, but I will presume that the carrier bearing should be mounted so that the circular plane of the bearing is normal or perpendicular to the centerline of the car in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In other words, the bearing should not be “leaning” forward or backwards, or “tilted” to the left or right. It should also not be mislocated left to right or front or back. Again, I don’t have an EA82 to crawl under any more so I don’t know if the front shaft is constrained at the tranny or if it slips in, but for the rear shaft, if the bearing is mislocated up or down, I would guess it will put an axial load on the bearing, similar to mislocating it front to back.



Any of these conditions will have a tendency to wear out the bearing prematurely. This is relative, of course. We are not building a watch here, and I will not attempt to guess at what acceptable tolerances would be for the location of the bearing placement.

The bearing itself is mounted in rubber, that will take up any little misalinement of your mount. If the mount is solid and not way off from the centerline it should not wobble and be fine. The carrier bearing mount is just a hanger to hold the bearing. It dosen't deal with any stress or torque. Here is an older thread about this. http://www.ultimates...t=bearing mount

#16 jeffroid

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 11:28 AM

I agree, and thanks for the link to the old thread. Again, it’s just a matter of degree I guess. A little misalignment should not be any problem, but if you get it off far enough loads will be transferred through the rubber to the bearing.



I think I’d rather go one piece, but I don’t see anybody stepping up with recommendations for a shop that can lengthen my driveshaft for a reasonable price. So I guess unless somebody does, when I get ready to do it I’ll have to make a bracket using all this helpful advice.



When I get more time I’ll scout around and see if I can find some driveline shops that will give me some estimates and post the results.

#17 Craven

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 01:10 PM

I agree, and thanks for the link to the old thread. Again, it’s just a matter of degree I guess. A little misalignment should not be any problem, but if you get it off far enough loads will be transferred through the rubber to the bearing.



I think I’d rather go one piece, but I don’t see anybody stepping up with recommendations for a shop that can lengthen my driveshaft for a reasonable price. So I guess unless somebody does, when I get ready to do it I’ll have to make a bracket using all this helpful advice.



When I get more time I’ll scout around and see if I can find some driveline shops that will give me some estimates and post the results.

A few places to start.
Precision Driveshafts Inc
Complete Repair Shop for Custom Differentials, Aluminum Drivelines, Differential Oil Leaks, Custom Steel and Aluminum Driveshafts.
11332 120th Ave Ne Suite 117, Kirkland, WA 98033
(425) 889-1456
phonephone Posted Image Click here for more info
Categories: Auto Transmissions, Towing, Drive Shafts
Drive Line Service of Seattle
108 South Brandon Street, Seattle, WA 98108
(206) 762-2270
business profile | phonephone | map | save Categories: Drive Shafts
Drivelines NW
1943 4th Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98134
(206) 622-8760
Email: sales@aquadrive.net
business profile | phonephone | emailemail | map | save Categories: Auto Accessories Retail, Drive Shafts
PTO Sales of Washington
1943 4th Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98134
(253) 922-7350
business profile | phonephone | map | save Categories: Auto CV Joints & Axles, Auto Accessories Retail, Drive Shafts


#18 jeffroid

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 01:16 PM

Man, that is awesome - thanks very much. I'm off this Friday. I'll make some calls ! ! !

#19 MilesFox

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 02:16 PM

just to make a point on the contrary, the carrier bearing is not a load carrying bearing, does not take torque load, it just supports the articulation point of the driveshaft

one could spend for a single piece driveshaft if they are concerned about carrier bearing failure, on the other hand, a replacement at the junkyard could be had for cheap. the front half contains the bearing. the front half will be specific to the tranny so a replacement would have to come off another 5spd 4wd car, either dual range, single range, or full time 4wd

#20 MorganM

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 02:22 PM

No fancy brackets here or one peice shaft. I threw aside the BYB 3" extension blocks for the bearing bracket, flipped the bearing upside down, grabed the driveshaft, centerd the carrier bearing bracket up into the tunnel and Archemmitis welded it in. No funny vibrations, no wobbeling, and its rock solid at 70 MPH. Hardest part was not catching the carpet on fire :-p

Lowest estimate in my area for a solid shaft was $300. Wasn't in my budget :( I'd love one but thats what I paid for my lift kit.

#21 MilesFox

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 02:32 PM

centerd the carrier bearing bracket up into the tunnel and Archemmitis welded it in. Hardest part was not catching the carpet on fire :-p


HA! tell me about it. mcdonalds trash on the console wouldn help matters either. almost burnt my sedan to the ground welding it. hence the bracket instead, easy to make!

#22 Craven

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 04:11 PM

just to make a point on the contrary, the carrier bearing is not a load carrying bearing, does not take torque load, it just supports the articulation point of the driveshaft

I thought I said that.




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