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Which Loctite For The Crank-Pulley Bolt?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 blitz

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Posted 27 March 2005 - 04:37 PM

HAPPY TURKEY DAY ALL! :drunk: Hey, what's the correct Loctite product for keeping the the crank-pulley bolt from walking out?

I'm assuming it's the blue (#242) removable stuff unless someone tells me otherwise. The green (#290) and red (#271) both require heat to remove, don't want that, do I?

#2 NOMAD327

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Posted 27 March 2005 - 07:05 PM

All loctite thread sealers break down at about 200 degrees, which is good to know. The red 271 or 272 are intended to have bolt breaking holding power unless heated. The blue 242 is ideal for what you are doing, it is intended to break free with wrenching torque. The green 290 is very cool stuff, it has lower holding power than the 242, but will seep into a threaded joint that is already assembled and lock it after seeping in. 290 will also seal a porosity in a weld joint or casting, which can stop an air leak on a tank or wheel. The way they work is they stay liquid until they are deprived of oxygen in the assembled joint. They also react to the touch of metal, so if you are seeing the tip of the bottle plug up, it is from touching the tip of the bottle to the metal during application.

#3 99obw

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Posted 27 March 2005 - 07:35 PM

I knew loctite was anerobic but I did not know why my loctite always gunked up on the end, now I do. Great info Nomad, thanks!

Yep, I use the blue for anything that may ever need to be disassembled again, everything else gets the red.

#4 Scottbaru

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Posted 27 March 2005 - 08:58 PM

I use mostly red when assembling machinery, it comes apart alright without heating days later. This is on newly machined parts, usually hardened steel bolts #6 through 3/8, in oxidized steel or anodized aluminum parts. Does it set up harder long term? I also use bearing locker on bearings, it releases with some persuasion. I've used superglue instead of locktight in a pinch, similar results.

#5 cookie

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Posted 27 March 2005 - 09:14 PM

for along time holds very hard. Just a propane torch will help it let go though.
I use the blue if I am going to remove it on a regular basis. If I am installing it forever red is fine.
This is one of the times that it does not hurt to follow the directions because that bolt is hard to get off anyway.

#6 hklaine

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Posted 27 March 2005 - 10:00 PM

I would have to second the endorsement of blue. That's what I use for this application and have had good results (bolt always comes off, pulley has never gone through the radiator :) ).

-Heikki

#7 blitz

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 11:36 AM

Thanks for the info everyone.

This morning I broke-loose & unscrewed the crank bolt, then SLIPPED THE CRANK PULLEY OFF BY HAND! :banana:

I've had the hardest time doing some of the simplest maintenance chores on my Subarus (removing fuel line from filter, etc.), so the one procedure I've been dreading goes smooothly. Thank god for small miracles.

If the rest of the job goes this well I may end up enjoying working on my cars like I used to.

#8 hklaine

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 01:18 PM

Thanks for the info everyone.

This morning I broke-loose & unscrewed the crank bolt, then SLIPPED THE CRANK PULLEY OFF BY HAND! :banana:

I've had the hardest time doing some of the simplest maintenance chores on my Subarus (removing fuel line from filter, etc.), so the one procedure I've been dreading goes smooothly. Thank god for small miracles.

If the rest of the job goes this well I may end up enjoying working on my cars like I used to.


Now that's luck. I generally put a little anti-sieze on the inside of the pulley on re-assembly. It seems to help make the pulley easier to remove the next time around. Now if only the car didn't call for a timing belt every 60k!

-Heikki

#9 blitz

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 01:18 PM

Now that's luck. I generally put a little anti-sieze on the inside of the pulley on re-assembly. It seems to help make the pulley easier to remove the next time around. Now if only the car didn't call for a timing belt every 60k!

-Heikki

Is the high-temp (O2 sensor stuff) good for this?

#10 cookie

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 01:26 PM

would be an improvement. I always used to use the silver stuff because I bought a can military surplus that lasted me 20 years. I imagine anything you have around would work. High temp would be overkill,but if you have it....
The silver stuff works on plugs and they get pretty hot.

#11 blitz

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 03:20 PM

...anything you have around would work...

Thanks Cookie. Yeah, I already have the high-temp stuff on-hand, that's why I asked.

#12 hklaine

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 07:42 PM

Is the high-temp (O2 sensor stuff) good for this?


I imagine it would work fine, at least better than nothing.

I prefer the brush-on only becuase its not as pasty and is easy to apply, but I think the spark-plug stuff would work also. Sure works well on the plugs!

It's great for all sorts of applications, especially Subarus. I use it on everything that doesn't need loc-tite and has a lock washer. Nothing worse than backing a bolt out of aluminum and having the threads in the aluminum (i.e. block) come out with the bolt ;) It's also good for putting on the brake rotors so your wheels don't stick to them and they don't stick to the hubs.

And as stated, a can will last you just about forever.

-Heikki




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