Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Please help with removing fuel pressure regulator!


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 friendly_jacek

friendly_jacek

    Subaru Nut

  • Members
  • 644 posts
  • USA

Posted 23 April 2005 - 02:03 PM

My 2000 legacy has poor MPG and fuel pressure reads too high. I got a new pressure regulator from Jamie and thought it would be an easy DIY project.
Darn, the pressure regulator is attached to the fuel rail by 2 phillips screw. Very tight screws and akward angle and every screwdriver I tried slips.
I took the intake and air filter hausing off to get more access and no progress.
I am soaking the screws in oil now.
Is there a trick mechanics use with stubborn phillips screws?
Thanks!!!!!!

#2 friendly_jacek

friendly_jacek

    Subaru Nut

  • Members
  • 644 posts
  • USA

Posted 23 April 2005 - 03:45 PM

Please?

#3 blitz

blitz

    Banned

  • Banned
  • 1,091 posts
  • Warren, Michigan

Posted 23 April 2005 - 03:50 PM

Not sure whether you're using regular oil or penetrating oil. I've always had good luck with liquid wrench, but I've heard good thing about PB-Blaster, don't know if one is better than the other.

Penetrating oil in conjunction with vertical blows to the philips head (interspersed with some soak-time to allow penetration) is a proven method for freeing stuck philips fasteners.

When you go to remove it, use a hardened philips bit in a 1/4" socket, turned with a ratchet. This'll give you the leverage you'll need and also allows you to experiment with different "philips" bits (e.g. #0, #1, #2, #3, clutch, etc.) to get the best fit. Once the bit it slips and cuts the square edges off the fastener, you've scrood the pooch. You really only get once chance to get a stuck philips out, so take your time, think your strategy through, flex you're muscles, and go in swinging.

Unfortunately torch-heat isn't an option for a fuel regulator. :eek:

#4 friendly_jacek

friendly_jacek

    Subaru Nut

  • Members
  • 644 posts
  • USA

Posted 23 April 2005 - 04:35 PM

Thanks Blitz,
I used CRC penetrating oil.
Well, the screws are rounded now. This is exactly why I hate phillips screws.
I will try cutting and drilling them now. Agggrrrrr....

#5 Olnick

Olnick

    Ol' Subaru Guy

  • Members
  • 2,579 posts
  • Honolulu HI

Posted 23 April 2005 - 05:46 PM

Man, you guys have hit me smack dab in my greatest pet peeve.

We drive fantasically sophisticated, refined internal combustion machinery--the zenith of over a hundred years of engineering genius and refinement.

They're controlled by super sensitive space age sensors feeding minute bits of information to computers for maximum efficiency and environmental friendliness.

And how are they put together? With the cheapest pot metal screws a manufacturer can buy.

Arrrrgh! Drives me NUTZ!

#6 sea#3

sea#3

    Subaru Fanatic!

  • Members
  • 354 posts
  • Vancouver Canada

Posted 23 April 2005 - 07:23 PM

Before you try and drill them out , Try using Visegrips on the out side edge of the screws . You have nothing to loose if you damage them ,If the threads are stuck and you try and drill them out you still have to get he threaded bits out , always a dicey job
SEA#3

#7 danz75

danz75

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 156 posts
  • Everett

Posted 23 April 2005 - 09:55 PM

Before you try and drill them out , Try using Visegrips on the out side edge of the screws . You have nothing to loose if you damage them ,If the threads are stuck and you try and drill them out you still have to get he threaded bits out , always a dicey job
SEA#3


Sears has screw extractors which might work if you can somehow fit a drill in the area. I've heard that they work very well to remove stripped screws. I would only ddo the drilling out method as the last resort. I've had to do that before and lets jus say that I didn't enjoy it much.
http://www.sears.com...UseBVCookie=Yes

Good luck!

#8 friendly_jacek

friendly_jacek

    Subaru Nut

  • Members
  • 644 posts
  • USA

Posted 23 April 2005 - 11:54 PM

Never heard of screw extractors. Well, live and learn...
I exctracted one with metal saw and drill.
I purchased a Dremel cutter to get the other one tomorrow. I shouln't complain, since I'm spending quality time and bonding with my subaru; wait, I was supposed to windsurf this weekend!

#9 frag

frag

    Soob shade tree mechanic

  • Members
  • 1,777 posts
  • Montréal, Québec, Can.

Posted 24 April 2005 - 09:14 AM

I know it's too late for you now fJ but for others, like me, who read all the posts, one tool that's very good to remove stubborn phillips head screws is a manual impact driver. It's about six or seven inches long, heavy, takes all kinds of screwdriver bits and is operated by striking it's butt with a hammer. Striking it while holding firmly in hands makes it turn a fraction of a revolution while preventing the bit from getting of the screw head's indentation and rounding it off.
I think you can get such a tool in most tool stores.

#10 avk

avk

    My Outback is bigger than yours

  • Members
  • 958 posts
  • Somerset County, NJ

Posted 24 April 2005 - 10:48 AM

Didn't try removing the FPR, but in my experience, with Phillips screws the quality of the drive bit matters at least as much as the quality of the screw. Impact tool is likely the best suggestion at this point. But watch out for sparks.

#11 hooziewhatsit

hooziewhatsit

    I fix old cars

  • Members
  • 1,333 posts
  • Klamath Falls

Posted 24 April 2005 - 11:28 AM

I second the vice-grip idea. I've used it many times to break loose stubborn bolts, especially the ones in wierd places you can't get anything else on (like the bolts holding the mechanical fan to the water pump on an old-gen soob).

#12 friendly_jacek

friendly_jacek

    Subaru Nut

  • Members
  • 644 posts
  • USA

Posted 24 April 2005 - 02:16 PM

The problem is, that in this location, there is no room for fancy tools, even if you remove air filter box and intake tubing. The cordless dremel cutter did wonders notching the head and the end of the screw, so I could use a short flat screwdriver (coupled to a mirror) to get that damned thing out.

Well, I put a new OEM FPR and the pressure is 40 psi with vacuum connected, 50 psi with vacuum disconnected. It should be 30-34/41-46 psi according to a manual. It used to be 42/52 psi with the old one i thought it was defective. WTF? I followed a factory manual for testing the pressure.
I don't think my gauge is defective. I just tested my Corolla and the pressure was in the range specified in Toyota (44-50 psi).

Does anyone have any experience with fuel pressure in 2000+ 2.5L H4 subarus?
Are the stock FPR defective or the factory specs incorrect?

#13 gbrand

gbrand

    Subaru Fanatic!

  • Members
  • 379 posts
  • fort worth area

Posted 24 April 2005 - 05:28 PM

Check for a blocked or kinked return line-I have read that can cause higher than normal fuel pressure.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users