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Where to buy: PCS & Blower Resistor


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23 replies to this topic

#1 asavage

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 11:13 PM

I used "Search" but didn't find any good hits.

Where do I buy a new Purge Control Solenoid? I've read that the new ones have been redesigned to (perhaps) be more durable (part number ending in 351?).

NAPA and Beck-Arnley don't list them. Mine's got an open coil.

------------------

Next, how 'bout the Blower Resistor for the multi-speed interiour fan? Mounts in the air duct, under the glovebox area, two 4mm screws that like to rust into place, and one 10mm head screw on a plastic bracket.

Symptom of my bad one: fan position "1" does not run blower. "2"-"4" work fine. When I got it out, the nichrome winding for the "1" position is broken.

My local Subaru 'yard says they're "always bad".

I can find one source aftermarket, but my cost is over $70 for it. Looking for cheaper -- any ideas?

#2 86subaru

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 06:46 AM

my 87 turbo wagon does the same thing , but have not checked out under the dash yet , will spray lube help those screws you were talking about ? :brow: :drunk:

#3 calebz

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 07:37 AM

Local yard says they're always bad? Thats not been my experience.. pull the one you have and look for a break in the resistor coils. Then pull a couple at the yard and look at them to see if they are broken as well.. I'm sure you will find at least one that is good..

As for the purge control solenoid, I believe that is a dealer only part. Not cheap either.

#4 Guest_subu luvr_*

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 07:58 AM

i can get to a few ea82's for the heater
resistor, but what does the PCS look like?

#5 asavage

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 10:46 PM

Originally posted by subu luvr
. . . but what does the PCS look like?



Well, for the '93 Loyale, it looks like this (175k).
Posted Image
The unit on the left is the OEM unit.

It's located just behind the water outlet housing/thermostat housing, bolted to the top of the intake manifold with one 10mm head bolt. It has two small vacuum hoses and one two-wire connector (GL = Green w/blue stripe, BW = Black w/white stripe). The BW wire should have near 12v on it with ign ON.

[BTW, I ran across a '91 Loyale today, and pulled and measured it -- 36 ohms, and you can blow through it when de-engergized.]

The unit on the right (Subaru Part No. 14774AA101) is not for this particular application but I was told it is functionally identical, with the exception of the orientation of one spade in the electrical connector, so I'll snip off my old one and solder it to the new one.

[It measures 35 ohms, and I can blow through it.]

The dealer quoted me $120 (cost) for the correct one. This new 14774AA101 cost me $60 from a knowledgeable local.

A Google search on that number comes up with a reference to an EGR solenoid, so perhaps that's what it's for.

At any rate, I'm grateful to just have one. Tomorrow, I'll do the mod and install it, clear the code, drive it, and see if any other codes present themselves.

#6 asavage

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 10:59 PM

Originally posted by calebz
Local yard says they're always bad? Thats not been my experience.. pull the one you have and look for a break in the resistor coils.

Yup, mine's got a break on the "1" position coil. I just twisted the two broken ends together, and put it back in, temporarily. Works, but won't last.

Then pull a couple at the yard and look at them to see if they are broken as well.. I'm sure you will find at least one that is good..

I live in an area with exactly three junkyards within 50 miles. Two of them have NO Subarus, the third is the one I've been dealing with -- and they don't let you at the stock, it's a "we pull it" yard only.

If I was back in Portland, I'd have my choice of U-Pull-It yards, but not around here.

As for the purge control solenoid, I believe that is a dealer only part. Not cheap either.



Yup, that's what I found. $120 (cost) for me to buy it, and strangely, not in stock.

Fortunately, I've got a $60-plus-solder-two-wires solution in hand (see above post).

#7 asavage

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 11:37 PM

Originally posted by asavage
. . . how 'bout the Blower Resistor for the multi-speed interiour fan? Mounts in the air duct, under the glovebox area, two 4mm screws that like to rust into place, and one 10mm head screw on a plastic bracket.



Interestingly, 1st Subaru Parts has one listed for $38, but lists it for the Impreza (?). I've fired off an email asking for clarification.

If this part fits the Loyale, it's quite a decent price.

#8 pianodirt

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Posted 10 September 2003 - 11:05 AM

Al,

Try Pull-Apart-Parts in either Lynwood or Everett. I was just there last week and got the resistor block coil AND the whole blower fan for $2.50. The guy at the register could plainly see the resistor block, but he seemed to only charge me for the fan motor, maybe because they assumed the parts go together. Definately the way to go if you got the time to drive there

Aaron's Auto in S. Seattle wanted $45 for the blower fan, didn't ask about the resistor block...but they'll pull the part for you and ship it, unlike PAP.

#9 asavage

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Posted 10 September 2003 - 10:14 PM

Originally posted by jrumohr
Try Pull-Apart-Parts in either Lynwood or Everett.



Thanks for the tips.
Unfortunately, the Edmonds/Kingston ferry is $18 round trip, and it'd take most of a day to get there and back on a weekend because of the traffic, so that $45 from Aarons would have looked more attractive -- yuck.

I really, really like junkyards for some reason. I just don't have any good ones around here.

I received a reply from 1stSubaruParts.com:

Here is the part number you need to order 72083GA070.
Thanks
Jason
1-866-528-5282


Sincerly,

1stVWParts.com

Go to https://www.parts.co...m?siteid=213799 then in the section "Search by OEM Part Number:" type (or Paste) 72083GA070, from the "Select Make" listbox, choose Subaru, then click on Search.

It comes back with:

Air conditioner and heater - Blower - Resistor, 1990 - 1994, $37.46 .

I think I'll order one come payday.

#10 asavage

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Posted 10 September 2003 - 10:20 PM

Originally posted by asavage
A Google search on that number comes up with a reference to an EGR solenoid, so perhaps that's what it's for.

At any rate, I'm grateful to just have one. Tomorrow, I'll do the mod and install it, clear the code, drive it, and see if any other codes present themselves.

Well, it works just fine.

Now that I look at the underhood a bit harder, I can see that the PCS and EGR solenoids look identical on this model, with the exception of that connector, so I guess that widens the number of available units in yards :) If you're willing to solder a bit, that is.

Still soggy performance, but no codes after an 80 mile drive. Tomorrow, I'll look hard at the EGR system and see if it's malfunctioning.

#11 pianodirt

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Posted 13 September 2003 - 04:43 AM

Asavage-

If you don't mind waiting (I know, it's getting cold), I might head to the junkyard again in a week or two. If I see a good resistor block, I'll send it to you for $10 (includes shipping). Email me in a few days and I'll have a better idea if and when I'll be going. Depends on the weather a lot.

#12 oregonloyale

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 12:45 PM

How do I test the egr and pcs selenoid , Im getting #34 and 35 codes .
:-\

#13 asavage

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 02:14 PM

Pull the connectors, use an ohmmeter to measure their resistance.

PCS = "under 100 ohms"
EGR = "32-39 ohms"

AFAIK, the ECU only checks for current draw on those solenoids, so I think they can be mechanically bad and still not trigger a code, but that's only a guess.

If you're getting a code, the solenoids' coils are probably bad, or unplugged.

#14 thealleyboy

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 02:14 PM

Used resisters are hit & miss. Definitely grab any goods ones you come accross in the yards.

Another alternative is building one yourself with heavy duty parts. One of the posters on this board (Bill Putney I think) came up with a circuit that could be built cheaply and easily.

I'll dig thru my notes and try to find it. Perhaps it's already been archived on this board somewhere. Maybe one of the moderators remembers what I'm talking about.

John

#15 oregonloyale

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 02:29 PM

I am new to using an ohmeter, could be more elaborate?:cornfuzz:

#16 asavage

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 08:47 PM

I don't advise substituting a resistor for a solenoid. First, the solenoid I tested remains mechanically open when de-engergized, so you'd also have to plug the feed line. Second, there is absolutely no power loss to having a working charcoal canister purge system, and there's a very good reason to keep it operating: it keeps massive amounts of unburned hydrocarbons out of my breathing air.

EGR: if disabled, you need to recalibrate the spark timing curve, or you'll get pinging. Or you'll have to up the octane of your fuel. Cheaper and easier to keep the EGR system working correctly. EGR is what allows you to use relatively high compression with low octane fuel and still keep oxides of nitrogen low -- the stuff that contributes to photochemical smog.


On using an ohmmeter to test a PCS or EGR solenoid:

Set your ohmmeter to the 1x scale, unless it's an autoranging digital unit, in which case you don't need to set it to a scale, but just to "ohms". This is usually marked with the greek omega symbol

Posted Image
Test the ohmmeter by touching the probes to each other: the meter should read near zero, or possibly up to one ohm (on cheaper units). If not, there is a problem: you do not have the meter set to a resistance setting, the probes have an open, or the meter's internal battery is faulty.

Very old ohmmeters: you may want to use a "ohms zero" adjustment to set the "probes touching" measurement to zero. If your ohmmeter does not have a thumbwheel marked "zero", skip this step. I haven't seen a modern ohmmeter with this setting, but there are a lot of serviceable older units out there.

Next, locate the PCS solenoid connector. When looking over the radiator, it's to the right of the thermostat housing, and to the left of the throttle body. I find that it's much easier to remove the black rubber-like air intake duct from the throttle body, disconnect the two 17mm hoses from it, and move it to the spare tire area. Now you can look right down at the two solenoids.

The PCS and EGR solenoids sit next to each other, look identical to each other, are fastened to the engine via a single 10mm head bolt each.

The PCS solenoid is the one further toward the passenger fender.

Disconnect the PCS solenoid's connector. Sometimes a No. 0 flat screwdriver is helpful to break the two connectors loose from each other.

Turn on the ohmmeter (or set it to 1x or autorange as above). Connect one ohmmeter lead to one terminal of the PCS connector, and one lead to the other. I mean, the solenoid side of the connector, not the engine harness side! Probe polarity is not important for this test -- you can put the red and black probes on either terminal.

Unless you have clip leads or aligator clip adapters for your ohmmeter, you will find it a bit of a challenge to hold the meter's probes against the connector's blades and still read the meter: everything wants to fall off.

The ohmmeter reading should be

PCS = "under 100 ohms"
EGR = "32-39 ohms"

You will probably find that your ohmmeter does not change reading or move at all, indicating an open circuit. This is a bad solenoid (electrically speaking). Wiggle the probes against the solenoid's terminals to ensure you are making good contact. If you still get no change or reading, the solenoid is bad.

#17 oregonloyale

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 03:38 PM

Excellent explenation, thank you.
What I ahve found is that when testing my pcs selenoid the meter does not move , this means bad selenoid , correct?
And when I test the EGR selenoid the meter goes all the way up to 0 , this means an open circuit , which means it is bad , correct ?
More of your education would be grateful, thank you.
Jason:brow:

#18 asavage

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 11:29 PM

Originally posted by oregonloyale
What I ahve found is that when testing my pcs selenoid the meter does not move , this means bad selenoid , correct?

Yup, meter doesn't move = "infinite" resistance = open circuit = bad, for a coil -- which is what is in a solenoid of this sort.

And when I test the EGR selenoid the meter goes all the way up to 0 , this means an open circuit , which means it is bad , correct ?

No, zero = no resistance. This means that the electrical path you are testing is has too low resistance. For a coil, this usually means that the coil has shorted (overheated and melted) or been physically damaged (squished or run over).

Just guessing, but I think you should try measuring that one again. Does your ohmmeter have various ohm scales? You might have it set to the "1k" or "1M" scale, both of which are too high, and both would give a reading very very close to zero. If you have a choice, use a lower scale.

======================
I disassembled my bad PCS solenoid today -- broke it, of course, but also learned how to take it apart differently next time. Both the EGR and PCS solenoids are normally open to vacuum, and the ECU sends juice to them to close them off.

I'm going to check this tomorrow, when the EA82 is cold, but this implies that the true function of these solenoids is to inhibit EGR and PCS function when inappropriate, like before the engine is warmed up, or if it overheats or other abnormal conditions.

My AllData reference states this exactly the opposite of reality. Figgurs.

#19 crazily

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 11:21 PM

Hi, just got some information on the EA82 Blower Resistor pack information. i was surprised since mine also stopped working but i came across, hope this site helps.

http:///www.indyswor...sistorpack.html

#20 Redcap

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 11:57 PM

Hi, just got some information on the EA82 Blower Resistor pack information. i was surprised since mine also stopped working but i came across, hope this site helps.

http:///www.indyswor...sistorpack.html


Very cool, thanks for posting that!

#21 ivantruckman

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 09:12 AM

If you can solder ,you can make coils yourself. take a pencil and wind nichrome wire 9 times around , you can get wire at ace hardware , then solder it in place. i use to rebuild them but now im working 60 hours a week, if you can solder i can get pics of how to do it , and a material list let me know

#22 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 11:49 AM

If you can solder ,you can make coils yourself. take a pencil and wind nichrome wire 9 times around , you can get wire at ace hardware , then solder it in place. i use to rebuild them but now im working 60 hours a week, if you can solder i can get pics of how to do it , and a material list let me know


What did you use for glue to keep the coils from touching each other?

I have contemplated doing this but have never had a dire need. I do have two vehicles with no #1 fan speed at the moment though.

I read that you need a special flux for nichrome wire - what was your experience?

I was thinking about getting a roll of wire and making a few for myself and a few extra and then sell them to cover the cost of the materials. I'm laid off currently so I do have free time between garage work.

GD

#23 ivantruckman

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 01:52 PM

What did you use for glue to keep the coils from touching each other?

I have contemplated doing this but have never had a dire need. I do have two vehicles with no #1 fan speed at the moment though.

I read that you need a special flux for nichrome wire - what was your experience?

I was thinking about getting a roll of wire and making a few for myself and a few extra and then sell them to cover the cost of the materials. I'm laid off currently so I do have free time between garage work.

GD

I use a mixture of coloidial silica and fine alumimana powder , I work maintainence in a ceramic factory, im not sure where you can buy the materials, but you may be able to get the manufacturers to send you a free sample , if you make up a company name, the small samples are more than enough to do a thousand resistor blocks, the coloidal silica is manfufactured by "remet corporation" and the alumina powder is called "a152 sg"

the "coloidal silica" is a liquid binder .the alumina powder is the body , i mix the two in equal parts , you can use a little paint brush to apply it ,and it air drys .

I was able to just use 220 grit emory paper to sand the wire and regular flux core solder, i did apply a little paste flux as well

ill pm you some pics when i get home , i have one fixed and ready to install in my shop

Edited by ivantruckman, 19 November 2009 - 01:56 PM.


#24 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 02:50 PM

ill pm you some pics when i get home , i have one fixed and ready to install in my shop


That would be great - thanks for the help. I'll look into these samples :burnout:

GD




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