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13 replies to this topic

#1 Lesbaru

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 12:21 PM

Ok, here's what my 96 Legacy still needs: cam covers, o-rings, cam and crank seals, timing belt (and I'll ask that they also do the water pump and oil pump while they're in there.)

Could any of these things be making the car idle unevenly? It rumbles waiting at train crossings and long stop lights: BRRRRRUMMMMM brrrrrruummmmmm BBBBBBRRRRRRRUMMMM brrrummmm. I don't see the tach moving, just feel the rumble. Does it need new plugs and wires, too?

Friday I'm getting my alignment done. That'll be the last of what the @##$% independent mechanic damaged. I really hate spending the big bucks to have the Subaru dealer do all this work, but dangit, I hated WORSE knowing some dork had messed up my car! :banghead:

#2 ScoobySchmitty

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 12:30 PM

Sounds suspiciously like mis-fires. Mine did this, but it was the Idle Air Controller, and my tach moved. Maybe a run through with injector cleaner? Also, what octane do you put in???

ScoobySchmitty:D

#3 1 Lucky Texan

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 12:42 PM

IF it's a misfire in the same cyl. you may be able to sequentially (carefully!) remove spark plug wires one at a time. When there is no change (or it doesn't die) you've found the bad cyl. Still, it does seem like something more 'general' in nature.


Carl
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#4 Lesbaru

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 12:57 PM

I always use mid-grade gasoline. (I think here in central MI that's around 89-91 or something like that)

At regular stoplights and little short waits it idles just fine.

I'm a doofus when it comes to working on my own car (though I did replace my liftgate latch :cool: ), so I'm trying to get an idea so I can point the dealer in the right direction. Of course, this repair (seals, etc. and mysterious revving rumble) will be a few paychecks down the road.

At least with my alignment appt on Friday I might be able to get a Subaru backpack with my handy-dandy coupon. If they still have any left...

"Hey, check out my free backpack! It only cost me $1,000,000 in repair bills!"

#5 ScoobySchmitty

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 01:05 PM

Is that the recommended fuel for a 96 legacy? I run regular unleaded, because yes it's cheaper, but it also avoids such things as misfires due to the harder-to-ignite mid and premium fuels. Basically, the higher the grade fuel, the more energy (spark) it needs to ignite. So, try switching to the 87 grade for a tankful, UNLESS your manual says you need the mid-grade.

Oh, one more myth to put to sleep. the lower grade does not mean it's "dirtier" gasoline. It's just a rating that says "This grade gasoline detonates 87% as well as Octane".

#6 Setright

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 03:54 PM

The higher the octane number, the slower the cumbustion.

#7 Outback Jack

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Posted 15 September 2003 - 09:44 AM

And higher octane is ONLY needed IF you have a car that requires it as stated by the owner's manual.

If your car isn't high compression, supercharged or turbocharged, or doing a lot of towing in hilly country you are WASTING your money and going to ruin you catalytic converter!

If 87 is all you need, 87 is all you use!

#8 cookie

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Posted 15 September 2003 - 02:55 PM

on your current plugs and wires?

#9 Lesbaru

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Posted 15 September 2003 - 07:45 PM

I'm gonna try switching to lower octane gas for a tank, see how that goes. I picked up (from my mom, I suppose) the myth that higher octane is "better" gas. Hey, it'll save me a dime a gallon!

I don't know how old the plugs and wires are. (Scott! Where are you?!) I bought the car from a board member, and I know he took good care of it. The car is at 105k, so it's getting to be time to change a lot of things.

Are plugs and wires easy for a newbie to change, or should I ask the dealer to do it? (I ain't sending my car to an independent mechanic for a while! Even for something as simple as plugs and wires!) Is that part of a complete tune-up?

Thanks, everyone!
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#10 Dinero

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Posted 15 September 2003 - 09:17 PM

Changing the plugs and wires is not an especially difficult task. But you'd be best off having someone show you how to do it the first time. I guarantee cross threading a plug will really mess up your day.

BTW, how's the recumbent?

#11 1 Lucky Texan

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Posted 15 September 2003 - 11:03 PM

There WAS a time (maybe just 2-3 years?) when higher octane gas was 'better' in the sense that a: performance cars had the injectors, regular cars had carbs. and b: injectors needed more/better detergents in the fuel. and c: high performance ALSO meant high compression. So all that meant, high octane fuel WOULD actually clean a 'family-type' car's fuel system. But it didn't do anything else positive (oh sure, the rare vehicle that had some mid-range compression could have it's timing altered to get a couple more ponies). Also, does anyone remember Ethyl? NO not HER! I'm talking about tetraethyl lead. It was an antiknock agent (IIRC?) and higher octane gas usually had more of it. So sometimes, if your old beater starting knocking from a bad tune up or more likely carbon buildup, switching ot higher octane (or brands) would sometimes clear up some knocking/misfiring. So you THINK the high octane is 'better'' when you actually need some car maintanence. cars now are kinda binary. They work - then they quit (thogh there are now more vehicles that will limp home than -say- a decade ago). I think it's because of the computer system.
In the old days a car would very gradually start gouing downhill until you just couldn't stand it and did a tune up. Also, much easier to get going again on the side of the road with a paper clip, or some wire from the horn circuit, or a small sheet metal screw or something.

MAN! - did I start ramblin or what!

Carl
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#12 Nug

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Posted 17 September 2003 - 07:04 AM

When regular gas is used from a name brand station (Amoco BP, Mobil, Chevron) and to an extent Texaco, shell, and exxon, you are getting a reasonable quality gasoline. The first three in this list are the best quality IMO. The Lucky Texan mentioned Ethyl, I worked for them a few years ago running some of the Fuel tests and learned a bunch of stuff about gasoline.

#13 kevinsUBARU

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Posted 17 September 2003 - 08:15 PM

you're wasting your $$ if you put anything more than 87 in! And gas brand does have a huge play in performance also. I got sucked into using my BJ's Wholesale Card for gas at their store (like a Sams Club) where members get 10 cents off per gallon. Well, I usually get about 110 miles on a quarter tank, and I didnt even crest 40 on the last fillup:banghead: Back to Mobil for me!

#14 Lesbaru

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Posted 19 September 2003 - 06:22 AM

Ok, I'm down to a smidgen of mid-grade gas, so today I'll fill up with 87.

Won't try to change plugs and wires myself, at least not this time.

Dinero, the 'bent is great! Survived the first 2 days of the DALMAC (350 mile ride in 5 days). Got up to 34 mph which scared me! The bike did better than I did. Now I'm all googly-eyed for a Vision. (and I'd better train a lot more before the next DALMAC!)




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