Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Torn CV Boot (DOJ - Inner)


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 NorthLight

NorthLight

    New User

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Silverdale

Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:20 PM

I have a torn CV boot. It's the front right inner DOJ boot. I only noticed it because I was checking the level of my manual transmission fluid on my 96 OBW. I haven't heard any bad noises from this joint, so I don't think it is very damagaged at all. I have to replace either the boot or the whole axle within the next week. I'll be driving this car for about another 100,000 miles Is it worth the extra $80 for a whole new axle, or can I just get by with a new boot and grease until I swap in a rebuilt transmission next year?

#2 Midwst

Midwst

    Subaru Fanatic!

  • Members
  • 373 posts
  • Cedar Rapids

Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:51 PM

If you are going to go to all the trouble to pull the axle, its actually much faster and easier to replace the axle than replace the boot. The boots not free...and there is always the chance that the clips won't hold, or it will leak. If you are replacing the tranny, I assume you plan to keep the car for a long time. Most auto parts stores offer lifetime warranty on axles, so its not wasted money. It will need to be replaced more than once anyway. I have found that if the joint is dry...not slinging greese anymore, it is already getting damaged. My front differential got messed up, along with the wheel bearing when an axle broke. Personally, I would just put an different axle in. I have had really good luck with the "A-1" brand of axles. Out here O'reilleys sells them. I mention this because some reman axles are junk.
There are some cheesy 2 piece boot kits that you can use so you don't have to pull the axle. I have found them to be nothing but trouble.
Thats just my opinion. Some will differ with me...just my 2 cents.

#3 89Ru

89Ru

    Eat, Live, Breath Subaru

  • Members
  • 363 posts
  • Nashville TN

Posted 11 July 2005 - 05:14 PM

I just did my 95 OBW driver side axle. For me, the hardest part wasn't the axle, it was pulling the ball joint (to get to the axle). Other folks have posted ways to get the axle out without pulling the ball joint. I used the famous "pickle fork" tool to get the ball joint out and then replaced it ($22 @ NAPA). My half axle was $75 from autozone (limited lifetime warranty) plus $40 core or $55 from cvaxles.com plus 2x shipping (new axle + core).

I did a lot of searching and the general agreement is that replacing the axle is easier than replacing a boot...although some might argue that the inner boot can be done by only tapping out the inner joint's spring pin and somehow manipulating the inner joint from the transmission and not having to separate the outer CV, however, the majority seem to do the whole axle. If I had to repeat it I would again replace the entire axle. If you keep driving Subaru's chances are it won't be the only time you have this kind of opportunity.

Tools you will need: 3/16" punch, 3 lb. hammer, sockets (32 mm, 19 mm, 14 mm - preferably 6-point, breaker bar)

Things to think about before turning wrenches: if I remove that bolt, will I need an alignment (apply to control arm and maybe others)

#4 BigMattyD

BigMattyD

    Subaru Fanatic!

  • Members
  • 405 posts
  • Syracuse, NY

Posted 11 July 2005 - 06:23 PM

I was just wondering what "DOJ" means?

Big D

#5 Bmm001

Bmm001

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 202 posts
  • Lancaster County

Posted 11 July 2005 - 07:03 PM

Double Offset Joint

#6 avk

avk

    My Outback is bigger than yours

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • Somerset County, NJ

Posted 11 July 2005 - 09:53 PM

It's true that in most cases, an entire axle is replaced because of a torn boot, but most owners don't use FSM either. The main risk involved in using a remanufactured axle is that one doesn't know what the core had been through, especially the outer joint is still good: most cores come in with a bad outer joint. It is true that repacking the joint and replacing the boot involves some extra tools such as C-clip pliers and a band tool. But those aren't expensive.

#7 NorthLight

NorthLight

    New User

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Silverdale

Posted 12 July 2005 - 03:05 PM

Replaced the half-axle last night in about 4 hours. There are 4 joints really to break in this proceedure. Most of them are easy. The new axle cost me $97 after tax(Washington). I also bought a set of punches.

-PB Blaster sprayed on all the rusty joints
-removed the axle nut
-removed the stabilizer link bolt
-had a hell of a time removing the transverse link joint

Solution for loosinging the transverse link joint(which is attached to the ball joint above it) was achieved finally by heating the joint up with a torch and banging the transverse link down out of the way while lifting the brake rotor up with a jack.

-Finally, punched out the spring pin holding the inner end to the tranny

Installation of the new axle was a lot simpler than removal of the old one. A new spring pin and axle nut were supplied with the new axle.

If my old axle isn't damaged much, I may replace the torn CV boot and repack the joint for a spare axle.

Even if I were to have just replaced the CV boot, it still requires removing the axle from the car, so I think it was easiest to just replace the axle.

#8 avk

avk

    My Outback is bigger than yours

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • Somerset County, NJ

Posted 12 July 2005 - 03:35 PM

If that's the inner boot, the outer end of the axle can stay in the hub. All that holds the joint together on the inside is a big wire clip in the groove near the edge of the round housing. You take it out with a screwdriver. Subaru even has an old TSB about this repair that applies to all models.

#9 WANTONSOUPGUY

WANTONSOUPGUY

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Southern New England

Posted 18 October 2005 - 09:33 PM

I just tried replacing a front inner boot for a friends 97 impreza with a subaru brand one-piece boot...pulled the axle, removed the old boot, and how in the world do you get the one piece on? I think you would have to machine press the axle end off to do it (to get the new boot on). So we just bought a new axle...much simpler.

#10 avk

avk

    My Outback is bigger than yours

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • Somerset County, NJ

Posted 19 October 2005 - 12:46 AM

Inside DOJ housing (the round piece with a splined end attached to it), there's a wire circlip in a groove along the edge. After you pick it with a screwdriver and remove, the balls come out of the races, the cage comes off, and you see the inner race held to the axle shaft with an external snap ring. You clean the parts, fill the boot with some grease, slide the small end of the boot on the shaft, assemble everything back together with grease, then put the big end on the housing. Don't even need to remove the other end from the hub.

#11 SUBARU3

SUBARU3

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • 2,734 posts
  • Dallas, Ft. Worth, Texas

Posted 19 October 2005 - 01:27 PM

I'm for replacing the boot. Easy job. Abeit a bit messy!

Todd

#12 tomson1355

tomson1355

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 155 posts
  • Upstate

Posted 07 November 2005 - 06:15 PM

Inside DOJ housing (the round piece with a splined end attached to it), there's a wire circlip in a groove along the edge. After you pick it with a screwdriver and remove, the balls come out of the races, the cage comes off, and you see the inner race held to the axle shaft with an external snap ring. You clean the parts, fill the boot with some grease, slide the small end of the boot on the shaft, assemble everything back together with grease, then put the big end on the housing. Don't even need to remove the other end from the hub.


Found this on a search and bumped it up. Is this saying that I can replace the inner boot by removing only the inner joint from the front diff? I have the engine out so I have good access and I already broke the head off the BJ pinch bolt. If I'm reading this right I can take the inner DOJ apart, slide the boot on the shaft and reassemble. No?

Tom

#13 avk

avk

    My Outback is bigger than yours

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • Somerset County, NJ

Posted 07 November 2005 - 09:41 PM

Found this on a search and bumped it up. Is this saying that I can replace the inner boot by removing only the inner joint from the front diff? I have the engine out so I have good access and I already broke the head off the BJ pinch bolt. If I'm reading this right I can take the inner DOJ apart, slide the boot on the shaft and reassemble. No?

Tom

Tom: that is correct, but you still need to unbolt something in the suspension to get enough room for the joint to slide off the stub shaft. I removed the front pivot bolt for the control arm, as it says in FSM.

#14 tomson1355

tomson1355

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 155 posts
  • Upstate

Posted 08 November 2005 - 03:56 AM

Thanks! I'll give it a shot today.

Tom

#15 Gnuman

Gnuman

    1000+ Super USER!

  • Members
  • 1,399 posts
  • Richmond, CA

Posted 08 November 2005 - 11:15 AM

Tom: that is correct, but you still need to unbolt something in the suspension to get enough room for the joint to slide off the stub shaft. I removed the front pivot bolt for the control arm, as it says in FSM.


Actually, with the engine out of the car (as he stated) you can "scootch" the tranny over to the other side a bit and the halfshaft will just clear the stub. I have done this several times, myself.

#16 tomson1355

tomson1355

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 155 posts
  • Upstate

Posted 08 November 2005 - 12:22 PM

Actually, with the engine out of the car (as he stated) you can "scootch" the tranny over to the other side a bit and the halfshaft will just clear the stub. I have done this several times, myself.


I just discovered that. Too bad I broke that pinch bolt. Thanks for the suggestion.

Tom

#17 tomson1355

tomson1355

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 155 posts
  • Upstate

Posted 08 November 2005 - 12:56 PM

Is there a reason to not use stainless steel clamps on CV boots? Or do I have to get hold of a boot clamp tool?

Thanks.

#18 Gnuman

Gnuman

    1000+ Super USER!

  • Members
  • 1,399 posts
  • Richmond, CA

Posted 08 November 2005 - 12:56 PM

I just discovered that. Too bad I broke that pinch bolt. Thanks for the suggestion.

Tom

You do know that that pinch bolt will have to be extracted and replaced, right? That is a safety issue.

#19 tomson1355

tomson1355

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 155 posts
  • Upstate

Posted 08 November 2005 - 12:57 PM

You do know that that pinch bolt will have to be extracted and replaced, right? That is a safety issue.


Yup. Thanks for checking on me, though.

Tom

#20 avk

avk

    My Outback is bigger than yours

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • Somerset County, NJ

Posted 08 November 2005 - 01:55 PM

Tom: the OE boot I used came with a band clamp that required a tool, so I bought one. But I'm sure any style clamp will work, and probably they're all stainless.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users