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Timing Belts..how often?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 pmichaud

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 09:14 AM

by how many miles or time????

TIA

#2 TROGDOR!

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 09:20 AM

Recommended every 60,000 miles. Though if you do let one break, Subarus have non-interference engines and won't suffer any damage. Just an inconvenience.

#3 Tom63050

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 12:09 PM

by how many miles or time????

TIA


Do 'em every 50K miles to play it safe. And adjust them every 10K. Since the driver-side belt also spins the distributor (through the driver-side camshaft), stretching of that belt affects timing. I noticed a difference after I adjusted my Gates belts that had 10K on them. Make sure to use either Subaru belts or Gates.

The belts need to be adjusted because the tensioners do not self-adjust automatically like on many other cars. It isn't a big job though. Consider putting on new tensioners as well.

Also consider either (1) removing the outer belt covers permanently, (2) removing the center outer cover permanently, (3) cutting the center cover in half. The center cover is the big hassle in this job. You have to undo the crankshaft nut to get it off, and you can't replace the timing belts with the center cover on. Then to get the nut torqued down properly when you put it back on, you have to somehow immobilize the flywheel so the crank won't just spin when you try to torque the nut. That's doable, but why go through all that extra work?

In a couple of weeks, I will remove both my inner and outer timing belt covers. Long-time Board members say it doesn't cause belt failure (which makes sense since Harleys are belt-drive to the rear wheel). And when you do have to replace or adjust the belts, it's super easy.

#4 archemitis

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Posted 26 July 2005 - 12:52 PM

learn how to do it, then wait till they break :drunk:

#5 pmichaud

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 07:10 AM

Thanks I like that idea...no problem with snow getting in there?



Do 'em every 50K miles to play it safe. And adjust them every 10K. Since the driver-side belt also spins the distributor (through the driver-side camshaft), stretching of that belt affects timing. I noticed a difference after I adjusted my Gates belts that had 10K on them. Make sure to use either Subaru belts or Gates.

The belts need to be adjusted because the tensioners do not self-adjust automatically like on many other cars. It isn't a big job though. Consider putting on new tensioners as well.

Also consider either (1) removing the outer belt covers permanently, (2) removing the center outer cover permanently, (3) cutting the center cover in half. The center cover is the big hassle in this job. You have to undo the crankshaft nut to get it off, and you can't replace the timing belts with the center cover on. Then to get the nut torqued down properly when you put it back on, you have to somehow immobilize the flywheel so the crank won't just spin when you try to torque the nut. That's doable, but why go through all that extra work?

In a couple of weeks, I will remove both my inner and outer timing belt covers. Long-time Board members say it doesn't cause belt failure (which makes sense since Harleys are belt-drive to the rear wheel). And when you do have to replace or adjust the belts, it's super easy.



#6 Tom63050

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Posted 27 July 2005 - 09:38 AM

Thanks I like that idea...no problem with snow getting in there?


Not if you have a skid plate. Or you could make a short skid plate that only covered the area where snow/rocks could get in. If you don't have a skid plate, you will see two threaded holes on the body, just behind and under the front bumper, which are the two front mounting points for a skid plate.

#7 TahoeFerrari

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 04:00 AM

I only had one set out of several make it to the factory recommended 60K miles until I started readjusting the tension at 30K. Since I started readjusting at 30K I've had several sets of T belts go the full 60K (knock on wood).

I replace cam oil seals with every T-belt change and tensioners at every other change.




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