Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

How easy to replace alt/water pump/ac belts on 95 Legacy?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 reeze

reeze

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • Brewster, NY USA

Posted 26 July 2005 - 09:20 PM

Both belts on my 95 Legacy FWD look pretty cracked. A local shop wants $100 for parts & labor.

Back when I was doing all my own work (as in, when I had my NEW 1974 Subaru GL wagon :)), replacing a belt was a no-brainer. Now, I see a tensioner on one of the belts--and the other belt must have some way of loosening the tension but I don't see it, it's probably under the metal shield that covers the top.

I don't have a service manual or torque wrench--just a metric socket set and some wrenches. My wife is driving this car from NY to Maine in two days and I want it to have new belts. Is this a piece-of-cake job I can figure out just by looking at things, or are there any issues I need to keep in mind? Actually I don't remember replacing a belt that uses a tensioner, so I'd be feeling (no pun intended!) my way through this--though it seems pretty straightforward. TIA for any advice!

#2 92svxman

92svxman

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 70 posts
  • Poughkeepsie

Posted 27 July 2005 - 04:26 AM

I must say that it can be done in a driveway; because I had done mean a number of times after my back was broken. It all depents on you and if you still like working on the car, anyway when you get to the tensioner use a 6 " C-clamp to push it in and use a small pin in the top of the cylinder(it will make getting it back on must easier). As far as the front belts the adjusters for them are found on the left side of the engine (looking in from the front) there is a wheel that has a flat nut on it (facing you), that is to be loosened and then the adjustment can be done be using the bolt 3" to center. The hardest part is getting the crank pulley off, it can be as hard as you make it. What I found to make the job a lot easier is to us the starter to brake the 22mm bolt that holds the pulley on.
Good luck, stop by you local library; I bet they have a copy of the manuals.

Both belts on my 95 Legacy FWD look pretty cracked. A local shop wants $100 for parts & labor.

Back when I was doing all my own work (as in, when I had my NEW 1974 Subaru GL wagon :)), replacing a belt was a no-brainer. Now, I see a tensioner on one of the belts--and the other belt must have some way of loosening the tension but I don't see it, it's probably under the metal shield that covers the top.

I don't have a service manual or torque wrench--just a metric socket set and some wrenches. My wife is driving this car from NY to Maine in two days and I want it to have new belts. Is this a piece-of-cake job I can figure out just by looking at things, or are there any issues I need to keep in mind? Actually I don't remember replacing a belt that uses a tensioner, so I'd be feeling (no pun intended!) my way through this--though it seems pretty straightforward. TIA for any advice!



#3 BigMattyD

BigMattyD

    Subaru Fanatic!

  • Members
  • 405 posts
  • Syracuse, NY

Posted 27 July 2005 - 05:39 AM

Replacing the belts is extremely simple, and can be done in 10 or 15 minutes with a minumum of tools. all you need is a metric socket set.

Remove the belt cover first, I think there are a few bolts holding it down, one of them is on the alternator.

Each belt has its own tensioner assembly. There is a long threaded adjustment bolt, and a locking bolt to hold the position. Loosen the locking bolt just enough to allow movement. You don't have to remove it.

Next, turn the adjustment bolt in whichever direction loosens the belt. it will take a lot of turns to get the belt loose enough to come off the pulleys.

Remove the old belts, and put the new ones on, then tighten the belts using the adjustment bolt, when you are satisfied with the tension, tighten the locking bolt.

Then replace the cover on top.

You are done.

Matt

P.S. you don't need to remove the crank pulley to change the drive belts, but you would have to do that to change the timing belt. That is a whole other story.

#4 reeze

reeze

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • Brewster, NY USA

Posted 27 July 2005 - 07:09 AM

Thanks Matt! I got a little scared after reading the previous reply, but you've set my mind at ease. I'm off to the parts store today!

And thanks for your reply too, 92svxman. Sounds like you thought I was doing the timing belt too. Actually, I *will* be having that job done in Maine in about a week. The cost here in the NY area=$375. Maine? $160!

Replacing the belts is extremely simple, and can be done in 10 or 15 minutes with a minumum of tools. all you need is a metric socket set.

Remove the belt cover first, I think there are a few bolts holding it down, one of them is on the alternator.

Each belt has its own tensioner assembly. There is a long threaded adjustment bolt, and a locking bolt to hold the position. Loosen the locking bolt just enough to allow movement. You don't have to remove it.

Next, turn the adjustment bolt in whichever direction loosens the belt. it will take a lot of turns to get the belt loose enough to come off the pulleys.

Remove the old belts, and put the new ones on, then tighten the belts using the adjustment bolt, when you are satisfied with the tension, tighten the locking bolt.

Then replace the cover on top.

You are done.

Matt

P.S. you don't need to remove the crank pulley to change the drive belts, but you would have to do that to change the timing belt. That is a whole other story.



#5 reeze

reeze

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • Brewster, NY USA

Posted 28 July 2005 - 09:30 PM

Not that anyone will still be reading this thread, but...

I did replace the alternator belt, it was a piece of cake.

The A/C belt was another matter. Unfortunately I only have a 3/8" socket handle (not a rachet), and my 12mm socket is a 1/4" drive; I use a 3/8" to 1/4" adaptor. There is not enough clearance between the locking bolt and the plastic housing that protects the fan for me to get the socket on the bolt. A closed-end wrench with a little offset would probably be the ideal tool for this.

In any event, the old alternator belt was was pretty well gone, the a/c belt is in much better condition so it can probably wait. Thanks again everybody for your guidance!

#6 BigMattyD

BigMattyD

    Subaru Fanatic!

  • Members
  • 405 posts
  • Syracuse, NY

Posted 29 July 2005 - 08:13 AM

My friend, I feel your pain, for at one time, I, too, was limited in my ability to work on cars because of my lack of suitable tools.


My advice to you is this: go to Wal-mart and pick up a cheap set of tools, and a set of 3/8 inch drive assorted length socket extensions. It will make your life much easier.

If you are only going to do occasional maintenance, cheap tools are the way to go.

Matt D

#7 reeze

reeze

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • Brewster, NY USA

Posted 29 July 2005 - 10:54 AM

I hear you, I was at Sears yesterday contemplating their 117 piece Companion--not Craftsman--"mechanic's" tool set--for $40. Should have done it, but I thought at the time that the $4 3/8" to 1/4" adapter would get me through this job. I didn't find out I was wrong until later.

My friend, I feel your pain, for at one time, I, too, was limited in my ability to work on cars because of my lack of suitable tools.


My advice to you is this: go to Wal-mart and pick up a cheap set of tools, and a set of 3/8 inch drive assorted length socket extensions. It will make your life much easier.

If you are only going to do occasional maintenance, cheap tools are the way to go.

Matt D






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users