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Replacement Cost of Brake Pads and Rotors


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20 replies to this topic

#1 cwj

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 05:55 PM

I have an Outback and was just informed by a on-dealer service shop that I need to replace both front and rear pads and rotors. I was quoted a price of $650. When I expressed my shock at the price the service manager's reply was "hey, I didn't tell you to buy a Subaru. Besides, it's a 4wd." Wisecracks aside, does this price seem reasonable? I'm in the Chicago area, if that helps.

Thanks in advance for guidance

#2 mattocs

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 06:00 PM

If you don't do it yourself, it is reasonable. About $150 per wheel for pads, rotors and labor is what small shops usuly do it for (at least in my case)

New pads for my Outback = $150.
New rear rotors = $55
New front rotors = $110

Those are Subaru pads and basic rotors from Advance Auto Parts. So like $315 in parts for a good brake job with good parts...

so is it worth that much extra for sketchy parts (is this a dealer or what?) and labor?

..and what does it being a Subaru and AWD have to do with anything? It is a bit heavy...so are a lot of cars...and they have to stop, too...

#3 cwj

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 06:05 PM

It's an independent shop and includes a lifetime warranty. Thanks for the quick reply. I guess I can trade some peace of mind for my wallet.

Thanks again.

If you don't do it yourself, it is reasonable. About $150 per wheel for pads, rotors and labor is what small shops usuly do it for (at least in my case)

New pads for my Outback = $150.
New rear rotors = $55
New front rotors = $110

Those are Subaru pads and basic rotors from Advance Auto Parts. So like $315 in parts for a good brake job with good parts...

so is it worth that much extra for sketchy parts (is this a dealer or what?) and labor?



#4 mattocs

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 06:08 PM

Lifetime on what? Pads made of some hard material that will DESTROY rotors? I'd only go with this if the rotors include a lifetime warenty, too, and any future parts and labor are totaly free.

#5 Dickensheets

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 08:08 PM

I just did my brakes on my 97 OBW. I had the rotors turned for $10 a piece and bought cheapy pads at autozone. 4 hrs of my own labor free of charge. Total cost was under $100 for all 4 wheels. Obviously not the highest qulity parts but it stops as good as it ever did.

Ryan

#6 SubyNoobie

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 09:02 PM

Buy a book for working on your Subaru, and do it yourself. Rotors were around $40 each for my 95 Legacy, and pads were another $30 each. It's not too hard to do as long as you're careful. You don't want to mess up your brakes.. You need them. ;)

#7 MiniTransAm

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Posted 13 August 2005 - 06:47 AM

Don't fall for that lifetime stuff. Usually those brakes will end up chewing something up. Example. If you have lifetime pads, you'll keep going through rotors. And vice versa. I've never heard one person that's been happy with those things from midas and the like.

I just did front pads and rotors on my 99 OBW. I used Raybestos Quiet Stop pads and their VSM rotors. I made sure I did a good break in on them and they have been fine. No warpage as of yet. Literally all you need is a C clamp, a few various wrenches, some PB Blaster and eat your wheaties that day. It's by no means a hard job but some of those bolts can be a bit tough to get off.

#8 nipper

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Posted 13 August 2005 - 09:31 AM

Lifetime warrenties are made as a marketing ploy. Usually they have an exception for wear items. When i worked for an auto part mfg, we knew that most people would loose the paperwork in about 2 years. ALso its not usually the part price that gets you, its the labor.

Subarus are easy to do breaks on. I would say go and take an afternoon and do it yourself, as you would save a ton of money.

nipper

#9 outback_97

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Posted 13 August 2005 - 09:38 AM

If you decide to DIY it, I would suggest a contingency plan in case this happens to you http://www.ultimates...ad.php?&t=38524

CN: broke the head off a caliper bolt

FWIW I got my front rotors and pads from www.tirerack.com and was very pleased with the service and pricing. I agree about the "lifetime" warranty, I tried that and in hindsight it wasn't such a great deal.

Steve

#10 pinnhedd

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 04:51 PM

I got a quote from Pep Boys for my rear brakes, this is including pads, rotors and labor.

$280.00

This is also using Raybestos rotors at $81.99/ea.
Prostop ceramic pads at $40.99

I think this is a pretty good quote, but I will still do them myself.

#11 dmanaenk

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 05:10 PM

First - I would make sure if rotors really need replacement.
Ask the dealer why exactly. They love to replace rotors, but it not always necessary. There are specifications of rotor thickness etc., and if its thick enough you can use your old ones.

#12 pinnhedd

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 05:14 PM

yeah. it's too bad I have to replace my rotors. they are toast. but it's only like $10-15 to get them turned too, so not too bad, then you can get better pads.


First - I would make sure if rotors really need replacement.
Ask the dealer why exactly. They love to replace rotors, but it not always necessary. There are specifications of rotor thickness etc., and if its thick enough you can use your old ones.



#13 Andyjo

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 06:43 PM

don't forget to soak some of those bolts w/ some PB Blaster before the job, a day or 2 of hitting them w/ it will make those bolts come out nice & easy, and hopefully you won't break them either =P

#14 oregoncoast

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:55 PM

You guys that keep breaking bolts really need to invest in an impact wrench.  Life is much, much easier and faster.



#15 later_Peter

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:50 PM

Drive on over. It's a "shade tree" kind of job. I started doing my own brakes when I noticed the guys doing the job. If they could, I could (years ago but still true). 10/12/14 mm. sockets (3/8 drive) or wrenches. A "C" clamp makes it easier but can be done with out... really not difficult. Some times the hardest part is taking off the wheel.

IF your time is worth more than $95/hour (dealership rates) let them do it. Quality parts can be purchased at any parts place.

I bet there's a video or two on youbertuber that will explain & show you simply how to do the job.

or

spend the dollars...&  the lifetime thing is marketing, btw.



#16 Rooster2

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 10:10 PM

Well, this is an update on a 2005 original posting, Thirteen years later the info still rings true. Replacing rotors and pads is really an easy job. Just remember to grease the slide pins, as part of the job. The original post of the car being AWD, has no impact on doing a brake job. Don't know why anyone would say that.



#17 craigmcd

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 11:37 AM

We have owned 4 Subarus and I have done a break job on everyone of them - not difficult, but be sure to raise and support the car safely, and tighten the wheel lug nuts properly.

 

Turning rotors is becoming an issue in recent years. In my dad's garage 35 years ago is was a simple given on any brake job - I don't even think they charged extra for it. I had my Chevy van done recently and they were resistant to turn the drums or rotors, and much preferred me to buy new. I was insistent and they did reuse my old parts - but I paid for turning. The shops like the wholesale mark up on parts, plus they end up with a big pile of heavy rotors to take to the scrap yard for cash. Finally, when they replace new it is simply quicker. All that said, your rotors can almost always be turned at least one time and remain within factory spec.

 

If you are doing it yourself you can have them turned at many parts stores, machine shops or tire shops. I have also heard that the quality of new rotors and drums is not what it used to be. It is a good idea to have brand new rotors trued on the lathe before installation - they will be close, so it won't take long or remove much metal.

 

Dad always taught me to wash my hands before assembly - you don't want any grease or oil on the brake surfaces.



#18 grossgary

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 04:32 PM

D

IF your time is worth more than $95/hour (dealership rates) let them do it.

 I have thought about that and would do that on fluid changes, brakes, and other short jobs...but there's still an opportunity (time) cost in scheduling someone else to do it - gotta call, schedule, get an estimate, drive there, drop the car off, get rides, or wait. Granted I have air tools, quality jacks, etc but I can do many short jobs quicker than the time investment in having someone else do it. So even with a high dollar on my time short jobs aren't worth it.  But I don't let anyone else work on my car so of course I'm going to look at it that way. lol

2005 post back from the dead!


Edited by grossgary, 31 August 2013 - 04:33 PM.


#19 FindingForester

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 08:56 PM

I discovered with my wife's Forester that some aftermarket rotors have a different profile than the originals. It didn't seem to affect the braking but it did cause some annoying noises when nearing a stop. I eventually had the original ones turned (one was quite warped) and put them back on, and the noise went away.



#20 uniberp

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 06:18 PM

You guys that keep breaking bolts really need to invest in an impact wrench.  Life is much, much easier and faster.

 

Salt is another story to you nwcoasters. It idn't pretty. It can actually weaken bolts.



#21 MilesFox

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 08:19 PM

You guys that keep breaking bolts really need to invest in an impact wrench.  Life is much, much easier and faster.

Rust






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