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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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Where's the best place to get a complete set of engine seals?


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13 replies to this topic

#1 Syonyk

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 06:23 PM

EA82, SPFI.

Leaking a good deal of oil, which really doesn't bother me, but my landlord is starting to get rather pissed about the mess on the driveway (I parked in a gravel lot previously, and it wasn't a problem).

One of these weekends, I'm going to pull the engine, take it halfway apart, and reseal all the soft oil seals & such.

I know there are seal kits that have basically everything you need to do this. Where would I get one?

And, while I'm at it, what else should I replace? The engine has 145k miles on it, give or take. I'm thinking maybe I should replace the oil pump and water pump while I'm in there. I'm also debating sending the fuel injector in for a nice professional cleaning.

-=Russ=-

#2 Subi81

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 08:07 PM

I got a complete kit form felpro at a local automotive shop.

#3 Syonyk

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 12:06 AM

How much should a kit cost? I just priced one out at NAPA today, it was almost $300. Is that the right kit (sounded like it included everything soft, gaskets, seals, etc), or is there a cheaper option?

-=Russ=-

#4 MudisFun

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 12:18 AM

www.thepartsbin.com :brow:

#5 VaporTrail

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 12:26 AM

Russ,
you may want to check with City Brake/Import Auto Parts in DSM. I get a lot of stuff there.

Mick

#6 Syonyk

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 12:29 AM

Ugh. Do they have a kit of everything, or do I have to go through and order everything separately? I'm not sure I know the engine well enough to know what all I need to order.

-=Russ=-

#7 Syonyk

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 12:35 AM

Ah. Engine gasket kit. Right.

Next question, should I really replace the throwout bearing and pressure plate while the engine is out, or can I get away with just replacing the clutch disk & resurfacing the flywheel?

-=Russ=-

#8 Snowman

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 01:00 AM

$300 from NAPA? 1stsubaruparts.com has an OEM kit for less than that.

You should replace the throwout bearing and pressure plate while you've got it apart.

If the oil pump is leaking or your pressure is not great, replace the pump. $1stsubaruparts.com has new ones for less than $150.

Oh yeah, timing belts too.

#9 hooziewhatsit

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 01:25 AM

a few weeks ago I posted SOA part numbers for most of the pertinant seals you'd need to reseal an engine. I say 'pertinant' since I didn't include the timing belt gaskets, etc, just the main seals. It was a fair amount cheaper than buying the entire gasket kit.

I'll see if I can dig it up...

edit: http://www.ultimates...ead.php?t=41172

#10 edrach

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 01:29 AM

I'm with snowman; www.1stsubaruparts.com

#11 grossgary

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 05:16 PM

300 is ludicrous. seal kits should run much cheaper than that. word on the street is that Fel-Pro makes a gasket for the EA82 that you don't need to retorque...saves lots of time. finish the job and drive. no need to get back in the motor again for a retorque.

ebay has EA82 python injectors for cheap....i'll probably send mine off unless i find good info on these python guys.

definitely replace your throwout and pilot bearings while you're in there. someone on the New Generation Subaru board a few months ago had a mechanic take the motor out and had one of those bearings fail very soon after getting everything back together and was quite pissed about the whole thing. it's cheap, replace it.

new/rebuilt HLA's from mitzpah engineering are a good idea as well. like 5 bucks a piece, you can't beat it.

you can try to reseal the oil pump and probably be fine but if you really want this car to go another 150,000 then i'd go for a new pump.

definitely water pump, timing belts and i'm doing the same thing to my EA82...i'm buying all new timing belt tensioners (www.thepartsbin.com has them for 20-30 bucks each). these pullies fail quite often, the bearings seize up and overheat the timing belt and it breaks. you can also replace the bearings on your existing pullies, but sourcing the bearings and pressing them out/in is an annoying process that requires some research and work. if you can press them yourself then that would be nice.

#12 edrach

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 11:36 PM

you can also replace the bearings on your existing pullies, but sourcing the bearings and pressing them out/in is an annoying process that requires some research and work. if you can press them yourself then that would be nice.

Sorry, I looked into replacing the bearings in the tensioner. This is not easily done unless you have access to a machine shop. Pressing bearings off and on is easy, except the inner shaft of the tensioner is peened over the inner race. Only way to retain the bearing after removing the old bearing is to drill and tap the shaft and bolt the new bearing in (and pray the bolt never comes loose). Been there and tried it and found it's not worth the effort and cost.

#13 Snowman

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 01:29 AM

Sorry, I looked into replacing the bearings in the tensioner. This is not easily done unless you have access to a machine shop. Pressing bearings off and on is easy, except the inner shaft of the tensioner is peened over the inner race. Only way to retain the bearing after removing the old bearing is to drill and tap the shaft and bolt the new bearing in (and pray the bolt never comes loose). Been there and tried it and found it's not worth the effort and cost.


I explored this as well, and it looks like WAY too much work/fabrication to make it work properly.

#14 PoorManzImpreza

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 11:09 PM

Sorry, I looked into replacing the bearings in the tensioner. This is not easily done unless you have access to a machine shop. Pressing bearings off and on is easy, except the inner shaft of the tensioner is peened over the inner race. Only way to retain the bearing after removing the old bearing is to drill and tap the shaft and bolt the new bearing in (and pray the bolt never comes loose). Been there and tried it and found it's not worth the effort and cost.


I did the above, long belt tensioner has nut and bolt holding the bearing, short belt tensioner has roll pin as there's no room to fit a nut spring washer and flat washer..the bearings aren't peened on; the inner race looks like it is induction welded to the tensioner hub...one needs to get the tensioner pully off the outer race then hack of the outer race and the balls leaving the inner race then cut off the top of shaft beyond 13.5 mm then one needs to mill it down true to 13.5mm. I then drilled out the hole to accept an M10 shaft (I think lol it might have been bigger but I can't recall, anyways it was the closest size to the inside diameter of the replacement bearings inner race coulda been an M12) I then bored out the tensioner pully so the bolt head would clear the hole in the pully I then pressed the new bearing into the pully. Next I slid the bolt through that assembly, you'll notice that the bolt and the inner race aren't a tight fit so I slid a bit of feeler gauge of the right thickness in there, it should be tight enough that you can barely get the feeler gauge cuttings in between the bolt and the inner race, next slide the new assembly into the hole you bored in the tensioner hub and grab a flat washer, spring washer and nut. Coat the threads with thread locking compound and place the flat washer spring washer then nut onto the exposed bolt shaft and tighen it down like your mother's life depended on it..70 lbft or so? If this is the long belt side, your done if this is the short belt tensioner skip the thread locker and torque down, next place the assembly so you can drill a hole through the tensioner hubs shaft perpendicular to its axis so that you avoid interfering with the pully or the tensioner mount plate this must be sized to match a role pin, make sur you are as dead center as possible so u drill through the axis of the bolt as well. Drive a role pin through the hole. Remove the nut and washers and hack off the remainder of the exposed threaded shaft..your done, go mount your rebuild/rebuildable tensioners, mount your timing belts and have fun!

I've run about 10k on this setup...




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