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Front Windshield.... (COMPLETED) reply


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Indrid cold

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 10:13 PM

O.K., never done a window before.
Stopped by Spokane Pay and Pull and got me excellent window for $21.

Pounded out my window from my 88 wagon.
Cleaned up the seating surface and ...... now the story/questions.

I stopped by local auto window shop. They took pity on my son (any one who drives an 88 Subie needs help..hehehe ) and they GAVE me 2 tubes of sealant... the window activator applicator and 3 tubes of black little vials used to prep the surface on the car. Also they gave me some left over universal trim...however it is 2 foot short...hmmmm...

The owner said I could nip the under side of the Universal trim to get it to make the corner and put some adhesive under the edge and tape down and it should work.

The old trim (shiny trim with corner trim) is kind of beat up... 20 years old and all, no money to buy new $125.

1.) So, do I go buy a short 2 ft section and use the Universal (I would put splice on the bottom). or buy enough to do the whole job ($25.)

2.) Or use the old trim and just kind of tape it, wedge it in...till the glue sets up as it is kind of bent, brittle and part of the wedge part tore off as it was removed.

3.) How do I heat the tubes too 180 deg F. They said don't put in water as it will ruin the glue.. I was thinking rolling my BBQ up front and set in metal tray on upper rack with thermometer... I am not sure if I should put in glue in the oven in the house as who knows what can go wrong there and my wife would KILL me... also owner said I could set on engine head as they run about 180 deg... for about 1/2 hour. Also I need to get heavy duty calking gun.

The original bids I got were $350 and $425 to replace this window.

Sorry so wordy and thanks for any advice.:o

#2 Turbone

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 01:34 AM

I will be doing the same on my 86 wagon soon, I had to buy the sealant for mine :-p I did not read the tubes but have never heard of heating them up prior to use. I cant get to the tubes right now either, they are in my toolbox which is at school which is locked up tight for the quarter break right now. Have you read the directions on the tube yet?

#3 Humble Nuto 53

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 02:40 AM

i just re seated the windshield in my 86 3door.

used two tubes of 3M eurethane. no heating needed. no primer needed.

cleaned the channel with a bronze scraper, used MEK, then brake cleaner to remove any residual gooey.

laid a half inch bead in the middle of the channel all the way around, and
assistant and i laid the glass in.

gave it a gentle push here and there, assistant watching for interior ooze.
went back and filled the gaps between the body and the glass till it was even.
then inserted the old black plastic trim (somehow i misplaced the bottom corners, and bottom strip, still havent found it, but found replacement at junkyard) was very artful along bottom edge and bottom corners and filled
level with glass, due to missing trim, as mentioned.

cost was 12.99 each tube. used regular caulking gun, and cut the nozzle about 3/4 inch from tip, could probably cut a bigger hole in the nozzle and used less hand to pump that goop out. also it was a warm day when i did this.
the eurethane cures up quite hard, i wouldnt want to have to cut this window out myself :P

make sure you have assistant to help handle glass, make a test run together so you can center the glass fairly accurately first time (there is lots of time to tweak however) and keep a roll of paper towels handy in case you over goop, or have internal ooze.

its a pretty easy job, once the old glass is out.

wish i could have gotten replacement glass, mine is 200,000 and heavily pitted. you west coast guys have it sooo nice with the moderate weather,
great woodsy trails and cheap plentiful subes.....

#4 Indrid cold

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 01:49 PM

Thanks Humble Nuto for the reply and info... I followed your lead on the trim but used the Hot application as that is what I got for free.

Here is a quick break down of how I did FYI:

Product: 2-tubes SIKATACK-ASAP Hot Application Adhesive.
1-Window Activator Pad
3-Body activator/sealer tubes.

Had too heat "SikaTack-ASAP" too 180 deg. (Caulk gun cartridge type.)
How I did that:
got BBQ, turned on too low, put 1" thick stepping stone on bottom rack, got a cheap aluminum cassoral pan at store ($2.50) put 1 inch on sand on botton, layed two tubes in sand and covered till 1/2" over top. Put a temperature probe between the tubes in the sand and set on brick.. took about 1.5 hours for it too hit 200 deg., figue 20 loss in heat transfer do too glue density. I didn't want to use wife's oven in house.

Bent to crack inner vial to activate window Activator and ran now wet applicator around sealing serface, wiped clean.

Bent to activate body Activator/Sealer and went around body frame.

{Previously bought at Homedepot calking gun (solid handle as suggested by Glass guy) and also had a regular calking gun. }

Put on leather gloves and broke seal on glue cartredge, put into gun gave one to friend and I did the other, he got on one side, I got on the other. Notch in glue tip sets depth.. put gun verticle to surface and V-slit pointed away (I accidently told friend opposite and he had V-pointed to himself...arggg... it kind of globed on his side...but o.k. I think.)

Ran bead around about 3/8" thick and tall, immediatly placed window in and had wooden shims on bottom to center window in frame. (Test fit prior to glue)

Gently pressed window down around edges and looked for goosh...

This is the important part.... took the old beat up trim that they wanted $120 to replace and shoved it in... if it looked like it wasn't holding I pulled up and dabed some glue on it and shoved it back in...... stood back 10 ft.. hmmm ...20ft... looking better...... 30 ft... DAMN FINE JOB!!!!

Drive time is 45 min with this stuff. Further info is on www.wikasolutions.com
They do make a cold adhesive but like I said the guy handed me what he uses (hot application) and I just had too make it happen.

I will find out at the first rain (Forcasted for Sat) how I did.... a smooth bead is important and didn't get that on one side as applicator error (my fault) but will find out how forgiving this stuff is.

Cost: Window ($21). Pull and parts, I pulled (blue tint on top)
Calking gun: Homedepot, solid handle ($10.) Misc-latex gloves etc. ($10)
Adhesive, activator pads and body activator/Sealer sticks (free)
So about $50 into front windshield... me likie :) Glass guy wanted $80 to put window in but I am living the part of the learning curve of Learning how to do it... not just watch. Cause next time... it gona be a whole lot easier!

Lessons learned: Priceless.

Leaks: Crossing fingers.... praying for none!

#5 Humble Nuto 53

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 05:01 PM

nothing like a job well done...

what method did you use to pull the glass in the junkyard?




its near 90 out there today, im gonna go out and eurethane the bottom corners, and the bottom strip on... have to trim the tab off the bottom strip and hope the eure holds it :P

i completely filled the channel after i set the glass.

#6 Sydfloyd44

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 09:50 PM

I am sure some will not like what I have to say, but.. Oh well.


As a professional auto glass tech for the last 12 years, every year I read repeated industry information regarding "novice" windshield installations. The common part of all of these articles is that someone either died or is parapalegic. Although is not impossible to install a windshield as a novice, there is a lot more to safety than one may think. You may have saved some money, and it might not leak, but if the exact procedures from Sika were not followed, it is a faulty installation and you and/or your passengers might not be happy campers in the event of an accident.
I have used Sika for over 10 years and I am trained 2 times per year on their products. Using a grill in place of the proper heater (which costs almost $500) gives you no assurance the exact temps were achieved to create the proper chemical reactions in the adhesive to work at all.

Maybe it is that I just hate to read those articles. Maybe it is that I just hate spending my workday correcting the problems that didn't need to be there to start with.

#7 grossgary

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 10:18 PM

excellent work. that's freaking awesome. in the past i've read all the posts on here about windshield installations....very few people attempt this, nice work. sounds like you took excellent precautions for heating the adhesive.

#8 Indrid cold

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 12:38 AM

[quote name='Sydfloyd44']I am sure some will not like what I have to say, but.. Oh well. As a professional auto glass tech for the last 12 years, every year I read repeated industry information regarding "novice" windshield installations.
........

Sydfloyd44,
Actually, I have to agree with you on this one. After I did the job and got to Sitkas web site, and seeing what I saw at the Auto window shop, I find that your right... I can't be certain about alot of things regarding this installation. Was the right temp met? Not sure-though I tried to confirm with a thermometer, and or properly applied etc not sure, but it gooshed out?
Further reading I now understand that the glass is part of the integrity of the car and plays a critical role to the safety of the occupants.

Being my son will be driving this car it makes me nervous as I tend to lean towards the Nervous Nelly (compulsive) side of things after I complete most any task on the cars...breaks, steering, bearings etc.. It makes me nervouse that he has too drive a car with out airbags.

The Auto/Glass shop quoted $80. to put it in. Next time I may go that route.
It was a great learning experience to install, the problem here is there is no way to test it, so yes I agree with you that this probably is not an area Novice 's should be unless they realize the potential hazards, consequences and potential liability.

I appretiated your input on this.

#9 Syonyk

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 01:46 AM

Glass & transmission internals are the two things I don't do myself on my cars.

-=Russ=-

#10 TimHansen

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 01:57 AM

Shoot, the Auto Glass Specialists folks only charged me $100 to remove a good windshield from my parts Camry and install it in another one we'd already removed a shattered windshield from.

The pro equipment for windshield removal is pretty neat, too. Imagine a Sawzall with a very flexible spatula-like attachment. Made damn short work of it.

#11 jeffroid

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 12:34 PM

I posted a while back about trying to do this myself and was encouraged not to do so. I called every glass shop I could find and finally found a place to do it for a reasonable price. I don't remember how much it was but I recall it being like $120 - $150 and it was new glass.

That was well worth it for me, but I only got that price because a friend of a friend worked at the glass shop. They also ***************ed about doing it for that price because they said it was a tough job.

I guess it all boils down to the delicate balance between how much time you have on your hands, how much skill you have, and how much money you are going to be able to save.

#12 Sydfloyd44

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 10:15 PM

Tim, it is the BEST tool to ever hit our industry. It is called the Express. Made by Equalizer out of Round Rock, Texas. It is a Dewalt sawzall with the nose coverted for the flat blade. Has been saving my back for the last 2 years. What stinks about it is the price. The sawzall from Dewalt is about $200. Once Equalizer gets done modifying it, it is around $700. Worth every penny, I think?
http://www.equalizer...Product_Count=3

Anyway, I am glad you understand where I am coming from. Too many will continue to do it on their own not understanding the seriousness of a proper windshield replacement. Nothing I can do but try to get people to understand. Some will, some won't. Can't save people from themselves.

#13 Seahag1978

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 11:08 PM

Here in Mass. we have no deductible on glass which has spurred many, many hacks to get on the bandwagon.

I have had bad luck with windshields (9 in less than 2 years). I know the ins and outs of bad installs... one in particular was not using the primer on the scratches and seeing rust within 3 weeks.

Sydfloyd44 is a conscientious installer and his advice is golden.

#14 Turbone

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 11:18 PM

I am sure some will not like what I have to say, but.. Oh well.


As a professional auto glass tech for the last 12 years, every year I read repeated industry information regarding "novice" windshield installations. The common part of all of these articles is that someone either died or is parapalegic. Although is not impossible to install a windshield as a novice, there is a lot more to safety than one may think. You may have saved some money, and it might not leak, but if the exact procedures from Sika were not followed, it is a faulty installation and you and/or your passengers might not be happy campers in the event of an accident.
I have used Sika for over 10 years and I am trained 2 times per year on their products. Using a grill in place of the proper heater (which costs almost $500) gives you no assurance the exact temps were achieved to create the proper chemical reactions in the adhesive to work at all.

Maybe it is that I just hate to read those articles. Maybe it is that I just hate spending my workday correcting the problems that didn't need to be there to start with.


According to Sika's web site, the main function of the WS is to keep passengers in the car. If people are belted up, this means its a secondary safety device (IMO). Being a Volunteer Firefighter/EMT for several years I have seen both sides of the WS, so to speak. I have seen what happens to people that are not belted in when a accident occurs, and its not pretty. The reason I'm saying this, is that its the seatbelts that save your life, not neccesarily the WS. Theres a chance of ejection from any window or door during a collision if you are unbelted.
Indrid, your link to their site isnt correct, this is the link to thier safety page.
Safety

#15 Indrid cold

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 02:39 AM

Wow... alot of interesting replys. Thanks for all the input and information and Syka web link. I posted the other one because of the technical info... but both gets you to the main link.

Like most things it's not impossible to do yourself... but the skill and knowledge are important when related to a safety item. If electing to do the install yourself it boils down to a personal choice, either reflected by a constrained financial decision or that of the independent, do it yourself philosophy and opening this topic up I believe is beneficial to those who may be contemplating windshield replacement.

I may or may not do the next one... but I won't be scared to do it now if I have too!

This site and the people are the best... Cheers!:D




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