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Forester brakes


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3 replies to this topic

#1 ron2368

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 12:21 PM

I have a 99 with rear drums . The pads are worn and need to be replaced. I have done some work on brakes many years ago but none for the last 10, so I am apprehensive about doing this work myself.

Are there any special things to watch out for? Should I do it myself or just send it to my repair man.

:dead: :slobber:

#2 Sweet82

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 02:58 PM

Mine are squeeling a bit too, I was hoping someone would ask this question.....

I assume 01's are the same?

Glenn,
82 Hatch, transforming...:temper:
01 Forester, jealous.......:madder:

#3 ron2368

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 08:09 PM

I dont know how similar the 01 drum type are to the 99, for that matter I dont know much about the 99 ones either.

I have read a source that says to turn the drums and another that does not unless there is noticable scoring.

Are special tools needed or can I do the springs with a pair of channel locks and a screwdriver?

Since there is a screw type expander do you need to bleed the rear if you dont mess with the cylinder? Plus since its ABS is that another concern if you do need to bleed them.

Anyone with some hints?

#4 99obw

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 05:38 AM

Originally posted by ron2368
I dont know how similar the 01 drum type are to the 99, for that matter I dont know much about the 99 ones either.

I have read a source that says to turn the drums and another that does not unless there is noticable scoring.

Are special tools needed or can I do the springs with a pair of channel locks and a screwdriver?

Since there is a screw type expander do you need to bleed the rear if you dont mess with the cylinder? Plus since its ABS is that another concern if you do need to bleed them.

Anyone with some hints?



I have seen the results of not turning the drum/rotor and just throwing new pads/shoes on. No thanks, my time is too valuable to do a job twice. I will always either turn or replace drums/rotors. I don't know if your vehicle actually has drum brakes on the rear or if it has the strange disc/drum like our 99obw. I probably would strongly lean towards replacing the drums/rotors unless they are in pretty good shape. You see less salt in PA than we do here, so they may indeed be in turnable condition. I have done ours twice, and after using wearever rotors/drums with bendix pads I highly recommend using OEM brake components. Our parking brake shoes are worn down for some reason. Maybe my wife isn't telling me something. I am going to do those when I do the wheel bearings. (OT: I got a hub tamer :banana:)

This is how I do drum brakes, FWIW:

Put on some safety glasses. I like to first take the master cylinder cap off and suck out some of the brake fluid with a turkey baster. Not too much or you will get air in the lines. NOTE: To get the drum off you may first have to adjust the brakes back away from the drum, which is a total PITA. There is a little plug on the back and the adjusting wheel is just inside. Take the drum off, put a pan under the brake components and clean it up really good with brake cleaner. You don't want to breath that dust, so clean it off first. I like to use vise grips for the springs. Only do one side at a time so you have an example of how it goes back together. I have always used needle nose pliers for the springs that hold the shoes on. Hold the pin from the back with one hand, grab the little slotted plate with the needle nose pliers and give it a push and twist, align the slot in the plate with the pin and remove. Check to make sure that the wheel cylinder is in good shape with no leaks. It used to be that you just pushed the fluid back towards the master cylinder, but I have heard that many people like to let it out the bleeder instead. Whatever you choose, push the wheel cylinder in. Take the adjuster apart, clean it up, and carefully lubricate it with lithium. Carefully lubricate the points on the backer plate where the shoes will ride with lithium. NOTE: I like to use new hardware when replacing drum brakes as the salt up here trashes the pins that hold the shoes on. Put it back together. Remove the adjusting plug from the back of the backer plate. I like to carefully spray down the pads with brake cleaner before putting the drum on. Spray down the drum as well. Put the drum on and adjust the shoes out until the brakes drag a little bit. Put the plug back in. Do the other side. Fill up the brake fluid. Adjust the parking brake. It's probably a good idea to bleed the brakes while you are at it.




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