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crank repair


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11 replies to this topic

#1 mdjdc

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 12:27 PM

I have a 92 loyale with an older engine in it. I don't know the history of the engine, but it appears to be an older carbed engine upgraded to work as an SPFI. The engine runs fine, but the rear main leaks even after being replaced twice. It's time for a repair sleeve, but I'm not sure of the diameter of the crank. Is there a way to identify the engine so that I can find out the specs before I pull the engine, or am I relegated to micing the crank and then ordering the sleeve. I'm just tired of putting in a quart of oil every week.

Thanks

Mike

#2 nipper

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 12:39 PM

It should be in one of the better repair manuals, but since even at the factory there is a range of dimension, you may be better off getting access to the crank and mesuring it with a caliper to be absolutly sure.

nipper

#3 grossgary

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 12:44 PM

wow, this is a crazy one. never heard/seen of this before on any seals.

does it leak from the perimeter or the inside next to the crank? is it getting pushed out at all?

could the crank be out of round or "wobbling", causing the seal to fail? in that case i don't know that a sleeve would help. are you absoultely certain the rear main is to blame?

#4 Ross

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 04:33 PM

best way would be to find the dimensions of a seal you want to use and machine/sleeve the crank to match.

#5 nipper

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 05:48 PM

wow, this is a crazy one. never heard/seen of this before on any seals.

does it leak from the perimeter or the inside next to the crank? is it getting pushed out at all?

could the crank be out of round or "wobbling", causing the seal to fail? in that case i don't know that a sleeve would help. are you absoultely certain the rear main is to blame?


It happens, but it is very rare on modern engines.

nipper

#6 TomRhere

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 06:36 PM

I've ran into this before on various engines, and in some of the hydraulic pumps in my line of work.. After many, many, add infitium, 1,000,000,000's of revolutions, yes you can wear a grove in the shaft where the seal rides. Those sleeves work okay, for the most part. But I've choosen to alter where the seal sits, rather than do a sleeve. Either drive the seal in further, or don't drive it in as far as it was. Puts it at a fresher area of shaft. Some of the hydraulic systems at work are multiple pumps driven by one shaft. $300.00-500.00+ for a shaft, or $5.00 for a seal, you make the call on that. So, I try to save a bit of cash for the Company. Plus, using a sleeve, you set up a potential leak, as the sleeve can spin on the shaft and not seal against the oil pressure as a fresh seal would.

Just my .02

#7 archemitis

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 06:43 PM

I've ran into this before on various engines, and in some of the hydraulic pumps in my line of work.. After many, many, add infitium, 1,000,000,000's of revolutions, yes you can wear a grove in the shaft where the seal rides. Those sleeves work okay, for the most part. But I've choosen to alter where the seal sits, rather than do a sleeve. Either drive the seal in further, or don't drive it in as far as it was. Puts it at a fresher area of shaft. Some of the hydraulic systems at work are multiple pumps driven by one shaft. $300.00-500.00+ for a shaft, or $5.00 for a seal, you make the call on that. So, I try to save a bit of cash for the Company. Plus, using a sleeve, you set up a potential leak, as the sleeve can spin on the shaft and not seal against the oil pressure as a fresh seal would.

Just my .02


i agree. dont drive it in as far, or put it in backwards.
but... id never go that far on one of these motors.
junkyard motor baby!_!

#8 Ross

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 08:15 PM

i agree. dont drive it in as far, or put it in backwards.
but... id never go that far on one of these motors.
junkyard motor baby!_!



Dont put it in backwards. If you look closely at the seal, it has small angled grooves on the sealing face that push oil inwards. If you put it in backwards, it will "pump" oil out!

#9 Snowman

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 08:43 PM

You may also be able to get a seal thats shallower or deeper, but otherwise identical. If you've got a good parts person, they can find one.

#10 nipper

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 08:57 PM

Dont put it in backwards. If you look closely at the seal, it has small angled grooves on the sealing face that push oil inwards. If you put it in backwards, it will "pump" oil out!


Seals are directional, thats how they work. If you can alter the depth of the seal that would work depending upon how deep the ridge is.

nipper

#11 erik litchy

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Posted 18 November 2005 - 11:57 PM

napa will have a sleeve under the listings, mine has a groove worn in it but never leaks there.

#12 ShawnW

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 01:19 AM

Its leaking at the rear main because your main bearings are failing, specifically the thrust main bearings. A full rebuild of the engine including having the crankshaft turned would fix the problem.

It also could be failing if you are using a NAPA or other aftermarket type gasket. I single out the Napa because I have seen more of theirs fail than normal. Use only a Subaru genuine seal. Turbo and MPFI owners have a breather plate on the rear of their engine may have a leaking plate rather than a rear main seal. The only way to know for sure which is leaking is to pull the engine away from the trans and inspect.




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