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1987 gl Wagon w/turbo -Bearing


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10 replies to this topic

#1 robertwheeler

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 11:36 PM

I have a pair of front wheel bearings that are going bad... I think I can get most of it apart... as it isnt all that differant that changeing a balljoint and cv shaft and a strut all combined. But what I dont know is exactly what to do with the bearing itself... does a machine shop have to press it (them) or can it just be worked out?

Thanks
Robert

#2 NorthWet

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 02:05 AM

They can be tapped/driven out with a brass drift from the opposite side of the housing (I.E. - inner bearing driven out from outer bearing side of housing, and vice versa). There are slight grooves/troughs in the bearing housing that can be used to get better purchase on the bearing race.

#3 robertwheeler

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 02:15 AM

They can be tapped/driven out with a brass drift from the opposite side of the housing (I.E. - inner bearing driven out from outer bearing side of housing, and vice versa). There are slight grooves/troughs in the bearing housing that can be used to get better purchase on the bearing race.


Interesting... it really sounds a lot like the typical front wheel bearing on a rear wheel drive car.... except of course this is a cv shaft not a spindle.

Thanks
Robert

#4 NorthWet

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 02:19 AM

Well, that is pretty much what it is... :)

#5 wesley willis

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 03:37 AM

what about getting them in?

#6 NoahDL88

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 03:45 AM

what about getting them in?


either a block of wood, a hammer and some skill at keeping it level, or a 20 ton press. i don't remember exactly how i got mine in last time, but i remember at least a big hammer and a flat peice of metal was involved.

Sorry about being as helpful as a screen door on a submarine.

#7 robertwheeler

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 09:50 PM

I just had a thought.

the inner bearing must be somehow connected to the strut asembly.... once I pull the CV shaft there must be something that hold it on... unlike a spindle on a rear wheel drive car.... a cv shaft cant support all this by itself.

By any chance.... does anyone have a Pic or a link that shows the hub assembly (loosely termed.. as I expect there is more to this)... it would be a great deal of help.


I do find the idea of a screen door on a sub... interesting.. I suppose its ok.. as long as its on the outside of the water tight hatch and its closed before you dive.

Any comments welcome.. gotta be more then I know by myself.

Robert

#8 BlueSteel

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 10:17 PM

all ya gotta do is belt the old ones out inner from the outer and outer from the inner, dont worry about messing them up becoz your putting new ones in anyways

to put the new ones in, just tap them in you could try using a really big sockes as you should only be tapping opn the outer edge of the bearing eg the bigger of the 2 metal rings as to not bugger up your bearings

all they are is a press fit so with enough hammering they will go in or out

#9 TheSubaruJunkie

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 10:26 PM

Ive always driven the bearings out with a copper rod and a good hammer. When you are removing the old ones, dont worry about them and just push them out from the inside. There is a metal spacer between the 2 bearings, so once you get the 1st bearing out be prepared to catch and clean that part. Once you remove some grease from inside you'll see a bur in the center of the hub. This prevents the bearings from being pressed too far into the hub on each side. Remove the other bearing and clean the hub out. Obviously, this is alot easier with the hub assembly out of the vehicle and on a bench.

After the hub is cleaned and all the old grease is removed, use new bearing grease and lube the inside of the hub, just enough to coat the walls of the hub. Also use a dab of grease and layer the outer race. Place the bearing onto the hub and center it, then lightly... and i mean lightly tap the outer race of the bearing evenly until the bearing starts to enter the hub. Once its started its just a matter of tapping it in. Avoid hitting the inner race of the bearing at all costs. One wrong slip and your new bearings will be worse off than the old. The copper rod comes in handy and makes it even easier. Make sure its all the way in, then remember to put the metal spacer in the hub before you install the last bearing.

Use alot of grease. You shouldnt have to do that side again for another 60-80k :)

-Brian

#10 robertwheeler

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 11:18 PM

Great advice all and much appreciated ... but there has to be someway that the hub assembly attaches to the strut assembly... I know there is a grooved sub hub assembly.... but something has to support the hub as it doesnt just fall off after you pull the CV shaft.

Robert

#11 robertwheeler

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Posted 07 January 2006 - 08:13 PM

Thanks for all of your help!


Most of all reading your notes gave me the confidence to do this job... and while it certainly did solve one problem it also proved another one.

Working off the ground with Basic tools this took me about 3 hours... And it turns out the hub assembly.. if in fact it can be called that is connected to the bottom of the strut and the ball joint.. on the bottom.

Just a brief outline for future reference... in case someone else needs it.

Remove Cotter pin and lose CV Nut.
Jack up car.. block it solid.
Remove the wheel.
Remove the entire disk brake assembly.
Remove the Cotter pin and nut for Outer tie-rod end.
Using the right tool.. loose the ball joint.
Undo one end of the Stabilizer link.
Remove the nut and gently push the CV shaft back.
Unfasten the 3 nuts at the top of the strut... Wont have to re-align.
Gently pry the Ball joint out...
Push the CV out as you pull the assembly free.
(remove the Outer hub and brake disc as convenient).

Take it to your bench.
Remove both Seals... these are either great or poorly designed and were hard to get out.
The old bearings came out surprising easy for me...
Catch the middle part tween the bearings. You will need it.
Cleans this up and lightly grease it.
Bearings go in so the open side is outboard. Don't forget the Middle part.
The new seals aren't too bad... but I tried to put one on backwards first. I did figure it out in the end.
Lots of grease...
Clean any burrs on the CV shaft and grease it too.
Reinsert the top of the strut... fasten just enough so it stays there.
Pry just enough to reinsert the ball joint.
As I didnt change the Ball joint I had to put my spare jack under it and push it up so the joint wouldn't spin.. Nut on ball joint.
Put the Outer tie rod end back.... get a new Cotter pin.
Put Disc and rotor on.... you may have to pull the shaft through in stages but ultimately you don't want to forget to put the hardware on exactly as it came off...
Be sure the Outer part of the CV shaft seats fully after its all tight.
Fully tighten all the nuts at the top of the strut.
Put the disk brake assembly back on.... don't let the rear pad fall off...
Take a deep breath and see if you have any extra parts. You will want to be sure that the Emergency brake cable isn't at the wrong angle to the CV shaft... in this case it went over and around. This is a great time to look at the hoses...
Put the wheel back on.... and lower the car...
Tighten the CV nut... Use a new cotter pin here. I don't have any air tools or torque wrenches.. I do however have a six foot piece of pipe that serves.
Test drive... and if your good.. your done.

I inspected the old bearing's and they didn't look so bad.... but it did take a shimmy out of the wheel and it seems to handle much better then before. Also we are now sure the rebuilt CV shaft has a problem.. but that isn't a critical down check.. yet at least.

Oddly enough when this was over... I found I had enjoyed doing it... a dirty nasty job.. off the floor... but fulfilling. If you have any tips that could have made this better or maybe I did something that I didn't have to do...
Please feel free to comment.

Thanks
Again

Robert




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