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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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another brake question


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7 replies to this topic

#1 seanski06

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 03:27 PM

how neccesary is it to have the front rotors resurfaced...when ur going to replace pads?

i'll prolly check the thickness and all...but is it going to ruin my new pads and cause squeaking

#2 stevecd

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 04:22 PM

if the old rotors look fine as in no heat marks or nicks you can reuse them, the rotor should be smooth and if they aren't they will need to be replaced, its not a good idea to resurfaced rotors since the chances of them getting warped goes up. Most likely if they change the brakes before they wear out completly you can reuse the rotor.
The squeaking from brakes is caused by not using the anti-squeak stuff or not seating the brakes right, usally brakes do squeak once in awhile no matter what you do depending on how hard you use them.

#3 nipper

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 04:28 PM

if the old rotors look fine as in no heat marks or nicks you can reuse them, the rotor should be smooth and if they aren't they will need to be replaced, its not a good idea to resurfaced rotors since the chances of them getting warped goes up. Most likely if they change the brakes before they wear out completly you can reuse the rotor.
The squeaking from brakes is caused by not using the anti-squeak stuff or not seating the brakes right, usally brakes do squeak once in awhile no matter what you do depending on how hard you use them.


what he said:banana:

nipper

#4 rlsimpso

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 05:54 PM

Be sure to check the rotors for thickness. The minimum thickness should be stamped on the edge. If they are too thin they could crack. If you don't have them turned you should probably be able to get a few sets of pads out of them. I am on the second set of pads on my brembos and they are still good.

#5 gbhrps

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 07:35 PM

What everyone is telling you is correct. Run a finger nail across the face of the rotor on both sides, and if your nail doen't catch in a noticeable groove, and the rotors are still within thickness requirements, just put on the new pads because the rotors are fine. The trick is to break the pads in slowly and deliberately. The pads will be flat, the rotors will not be. So for the first hundred miles, apply the brakes slowly, so the pads can wear their surface areas to match the minor grooves, lows and highs of the rotors. You won't have maximum braking surface contact until they do. So it pays to be a careful driver during this breakin period. I've used this method for years on all of my cars, and I've never had a problem. The parts dealers and mechanics will disagree and want both pads and rotors to have the same flat surfacing when installed, and they are correct. But if you are careful, there is no need to put on new rotors as often as they would like you to. Save some money, but be safe doing it. Good Luck!

#6 nipper

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 08:53 PM

What everyone is telling you is correct. Run a finger nail across the face of the rotor on both sides, and if your nail doen't catch in a noticeable groove


and what, break a nail?????

NEVER!

nipper

*giggle*

#7 gbhrps

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 03:30 PM

Nipper,
You are a very sick man ............... but something tells me that you and I could have a lot of chuckles after a few beers.

#8 nipper

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 03:35 PM

Nipper,
You are a very sick man ............... but something tells me that you and I could have a lot of chuckles after a few beers.


oddly your not the first person to say that :headbang:

nipper




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