Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

2004 Forester XT Brakes


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 canoeist11

canoeist11

    New User

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Elmhurst,IL

Posted 03 July 2006 - 12:22 PM

My XT now has 30,000 miles on it and I noticed that the service manual states the the brake fluid should be "changed" at the 30,000 service interval. I have never previously owned a vehicle that I have performed this service on and am wondering how necessary it really is. I believe I have some warped rotors so am looking at some brake work anyway, However, it seems that only Subaru dealers have the equipment necessary to do the fluid change, so it would limit my options for service. Also, how important is the use of OE rotors and pads?

#2 dxrflyboy

dxrflyboy

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 200 posts
  • Canterbury

Posted 03 July 2006 - 06:30 PM

Brake fluid absorbs moisture, which will lower its boiling point over time and allow corrosion in the hydraulic system. Changing it periodically will ensure the longest life for all the components in the system and minimize the chances for loss of braking due to overheated fluid during long, hard stops. It can be changed without any special equipment. Siphon as much old fluid out of the reservoir as possible and refill with new. Bleed each wheel in the correct order until the old fluid is flushed out (about 1 cup of fluid per wheel should be enough). Subaru brake pads are the least likely to squeak when you apply the brakes. The friction material on some low cost aftermarket pads tends to crack, causing squeaks.

#3 kevinC

kevinC

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 41 posts
  • springville

Posted 03 July 2006 - 09:15 PM

I just used the sprayer from an empty windex bottle to suck my master cylinder resevoir dry. Worked very well and very quickly.

#4 ericem

ericem

    First Gen Legacy Master

  • Members
  • 2,477 posts
  • CANADA Maple,ON

Posted 03 July 2006 - 11:41 PM

just out of curiosity what do u mean by bleed each wheel because i think its time i do it on my 93 leg with almost 300,000km with orig brake fluid.

#5 NiGhTeR

NiGhTeR

    New User

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Australia

Posted 04 July 2006 - 03:00 AM

just out of curiosity what do u mean by bleed each wheel because i think its time i do it on my 93 leg with almost 300,000km with orig brake fluid.


Bleed the fluid through from each bleeder nipple located at each caliper.

#6 ericem

ericem

    First Gen Legacy Master

  • Members
  • 2,477 posts
  • CANADA Maple,ON

Posted 04 July 2006 - 10:32 AM

Well that seems simple, and just put DOT3 brake fluid?

#7 nipper

nipper

    Semi Elite Master of the

  • Members
  • 17,512 posts
  • Long Island NY

Posted 04 July 2006 - 11:13 AM

My XT now has 30,000 miles on it and I noticed that the service manual states the the brake fluid should be "changed" at the 30,000 service interval. I have never previously owned a vehicle that I have performed this service on and am wondering how necessary it really is. I believe I have some warped rotors so am looking at some brake work anyway, However, it seems that only Subaru dealers have the equipment necessary to do the fluid change, so it would limit my options for service. Also, how important is the use of OE rotors and pads?


i think that 30,000 miles is really conservative. i dont know of anyone who does it before the first brake job, or the first 100,000 miles.
Personally i think doing this exposes the brake fluid to far more moisture then just leaving it be untill the next brake job. Normally i am fairly supportive of service intervals, but this is a sealed system, rairly if ever exposed to air and moisture. If you have a leak thats one thing, but in a sealed system, let it go. For instance ford f150 trucks say nothing about flushing brake fluid ever. They use the same brake fluid as soobies. Other mfg say 2-4 years reguardless of mileage.
the spec is all over the place, thats why i doubt that it is a real spec, more of a money maker.
Also the only special equipment you need is a freind with a working foot.



nipper

#8 ericem

ericem

    First Gen Legacy Master

  • Members
  • 2,477 posts
  • CANADA Maple,ON

Posted 04 July 2006 - 06:55 PM

Ya nipper is right, like I said i have a 14 year old car with 300,000Km and orig brake fluid, and never had a problem.

#9 Smpol19

Smpol19

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 215 posts
  • Nothern, VA / Long Island

Posted 05 July 2006 - 10:14 AM

Ya nipper is right, like I said i have a 14 year old car with 300,000Km and orig brake fluid, and never had a problem.



This car probably doesn't have an ABS system either. I agree that this interval is in all likelihood to conservative but this job costs $10 in fluid, and maybe a couple of beers for the use of your friend’s foot:drunk:. It’s so easy and cheep that if there is any possibility it will increase the life of the braking and ABS components I have no problem doing it. I also rarely if ever changed the brake fluid on my old EA82 wagon, but I've got an idea the braking system on the newer Subaru’s is quite a bit more expensive.

#10 ericem

ericem

    First Gen Legacy Master

  • Members
  • 2,477 posts
  • CANADA Maple,ON

Posted 05 July 2006 - 10:25 AM

Acually it does, and its the original, and in the winter it runs all the time in the city, and its still works great.

#11 canoeist11

canoeist11

    New User

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Elmhurst,IL

Posted 05 July 2006 - 11:08 AM

Thanks all for the input. Certainly sounds like the "special" machine the dealer talked about is meant to increase their income.

Will approach my brake work in the same manner as I have with my previous vehicles; will likely use OE parts.

#12 otis

otis

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 124 posts
  • Minneapolis

Posted 05 July 2006 - 01:34 PM

Bleed each wheel in the correct order until the old fluid is flushed out (about 1 cup of fluid per wheel should be enough).

I'm thinking about doing a brake bleed (just hit 100k miles). my questions are:

what's the proper order?

How do you know when you've bled enough fluid?

Do I need to jack up the entire car to do this? If so, I have a jack and jack stands but no idea where to put them. I've read you jack the car up using the jack points on the side of the car. I've also read that's where you put your jack stand- how can you do both?

#13 Pillowsplat

Pillowsplat

    USMB Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Maryland

Posted 05 July 2006 - 02:53 PM

I bled mine at 100,000 mile and the the fluid showed signs of use. I guess it made the pedal feel a bit more firm. As I understand it the fluid goes goes through a heat/ cooling cycle and condensation forms inside the closed system near the brake caliper. When you beeld the brakes you will notice the 1st couple of squirts are darker. I don't know exactly what it means but its not original. You can use the 2 person method or get a vac pump and do it yourself. Motorcycles suggest changing it yearly. Its not uncomon to change your brake fluid every couple of high stress road races. The symptom is just a spongy feel because as the condensation is reheated the next time out it evaporates and you get microscopic air bubbles and they compress easier than brake fluid
Just find something really beefy to put the car jacks on and unwind the jack.
Brake bleeding is a wheels off job. especially the 1st time.
There is a specific sequence. Double check but I think you start with the farthest wheel away from the master cylinder. Bleed the resivor almost dry fill it up and bleed till its clear at the wheel. DON'T empty the resivor it will introduce air into the system.
Remember you are dealing with your brakes there is not a lot of room for error. Do your homework 1st. try Autozone.com for a set of instructions.

#14 nipper

nipper

    Semi Elite Master of the

  • Members
  • 17,512 posts
  • Long Island NY

Posted 05 July 2006 - 03:25 PM

I'm thinking about doing a brake bleed (just hit 100k miles). my questions are:

what's the proper order?

How do you know when you've bled enough fluid?

Do I need to jack up the entire car to do this? If so, I have a jack and jack stands but no idea where to put them. I've read you jack the car up using the jack points on the side of the car. I've also read that's where you put your jack stand- how can you do both?


Oddly haynes says to start at the right front wheel. They recomend doing it right front/left rear which makes sense for the diganol brake system.
You can put jackstands on any solid part of the car, the frame, or suspension parts. Just remember to shake the car after its on the jackstand (or wood or cinderblocks) to make sure it is solid. i never was a fan of subarus (or anyones) jack points, but use it if you use the factory jack to raise the car. The tire does need to be removed (makes life easier). Place the tire under the car just in case it falls off the jackstand. do NOT lie under the rear brake.
There is 2 ways to flush the fluid. One way is to just bleed the fluid through one brake line untill all the old fluid is gone, while topping off the master cylinder. the other is with a new clean turkey baster.
Remove MOST the fluid from the Master cylinder and replace it the fresh fluid. By them time you have bled out all 4 wheels the old fluid will be gone. Pump the brakes with the car off to remove the vaccume from the power brakesThe person who has voluntered thier foot will pump the brakes 3-4 times. They will hold the brake pedal. You will then open the valve and they follow the pedal to the floor. You clase the valve and tell them to pump it again.
The bleed valves will give you a fight if they havent been moved in a while. you may want to spray them with a penatraiting oil the night before. You need a glass jar and a rubber hose if you use the foot method. The reason for the glass jar is so that you can see the fluid come out of the hose without spraying it on you or the paint (stuff happens). Submerse the hose in the fluid (this avoids sucking air back in the system). Never reuse brake fuid that has come out of a bleeder. The fluid is airated and has already started sucking moisture out of the air.
this should be a fairly easy job since you have not induced air into the brake system, its should go by fairly quickly.
As far as how much, you will get a feeling for that once you see how much fluid comes out with the first bleed.

hope that helps.

nipper




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users