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Strut Install Help


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Leotrp

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Posted 10 November 2003 - 01:11 PM

Hello all, I have a strut installation question. I’m getting ready to install four preassembled KYB G2 struts on my 1995 Impreza, and, since I’ve never done this before, I have a brake line question. Will I need to disconnect the brake lines from the brake hoses to install these struts?
I'm using a Subaru repair manual, and there is no mention of this being necessary to install the struts.
When I was under the car the other day, it looks like I have no other choice.
Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
:D

#2 meep

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Posted 10 November 2003 - 01:52 PM

yes, or cut a slit in the hose mount on the strut. The line comes off easily, and the bleed is easy too (you've already got good access with the wheels off.

All in all it took me 4.5 hours including the drive to the mechanic to have the springs moved to the new struts.

Be sure to mark the suspension-setting nuts precisely.

Also, be sure to use strong tools; 1/2 drive socket set is mandatory, air wrench or breaker bar is mandatory for removal, preferably a 6 point socket (not 12).

Mike

#3 Leotrp

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Posted 10 November 2003 - 04:54 PM

Thanks for the help Mike. I think I’ll take your suggestion, and I’ll remove the brake lines. I’ll head over to Sears, and pick up some line wrenches and a set of six point ½ inch metric sockets. I guess I can leave the brake calibers on the vehicle since I’m removing the brake lines.
On another note, how hard is it to bleed this brake system. The last brake system I bled was in a 1966 Mustang.
:D

#4 alias20035

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Posted 10 November 2003 - 06:04 PM

The new Subaru's brake lines are bolted to the strut, and do not pass through the hanger, this is much better!

Some added tips

Spray the lower strut bolts with "Break Free" or other penetrant lubricant the day before you do this work. Makes this job a little easier.

By preassembled, I assume you mean complete with springs and upper bearing plate. If so your job is easy, just a simple swap of parts, aside from those darn brake lines. If not I wont describe the usage of spring compressors to complete this job, as compressing the spring is extremely dangerous if not done correctly.

Bleeding the brakes requires new DOT 3 fluid, so pick up a half quart (or more if you plan on replacing the fluid in the entire system (recommended every 30,000 miles).

Bleeding the brakes is not that hard. You will need a single man bleeding tool, which is essentially a rubber hose that goes into a container (under $10).

After reassembling your brakes, top up the brake fluid to the full line and attach the brake bleed kit to the brake furthest from the brake master cylinder (right rear).

Open the brake bleed valve with a 10mm wrench, I recommend spraying the bleed valve with a penetrating oil before opening it, just in case of corrosion.

Pump the brakes slowly about 10 times to push the air and some fluid in the bleed kit. When you release the brake pedal some fluid and no air should be drawn back into the brake caliper. Retighten the brake bleeder screw and reinstall the dust cap.

Repeat this procedure on the other brakes working your way closer to the brake master cylinder (rr, lr, rf, lf).

Check the brake fluid level in the brake bleed kit to be sure that you don't overflow, and be ALSO keep adding fluid to the master cylinder. If you drain the master cylinder completely and get air in the system, you will need to flush the entire system with up to 2 litres of brake fluid, and it is a pain.

Only top up the brake fluid resevoir to a point about 2/3rds between full and minimum, DO NOT FILL TO THE FULL line. Why? Because you need a space for any excess system fluid to go, other than for it to pop off the resevoir cap and get over everything.

Another use for brake fluid is paint removal, so don't spill any.

NEVER ever pour bled fluid back into the system, always use fresh brake fluid from a sealed bottle. Once the bottle is opened the fluid must be promptly used.

Brake fluid absorbs water, this is prevent water from pooling within the system and potentially freezing or boiling, The brake system is sealed, but eventually moisture will seep in


You may have to do two cycles on all four wheels to get all of the air out.

Changing all of the fluid requires the additional steps.

1. more brake fluid needed, I use 1.5 to 2 quarts. Bleeding extra new fluid through doesn't hurt.

2. when bleeding the first brake (right rear), keep bleeding until the fluid coming out is clear. When it is clear your have bled all of the old fluid in the master cylinder and in the brake line to that brake. Just be sure to heed my overfill/underfill warning above.

3. repeat step 2 on each of the brakes until the bled fluid is clear.

4. repeat the bleed cycle again for a few more strokes on each of the brakes.

#5 nathan

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Posted 10 November 2003 - 08:06 PM

It is much much easier to just snip the flat piece of metal that holds the brake line in with some bolt cutters(much easier than trying to saw or grind and you won't accidentally cut anything) do it close to the left or right then bend the tab to give yourself enough clearance to slip out the brake line. do the same with the new shocks, slip the brake line back in and bolt everything back together. I know it seems a little radical to cut your new shocks but you shouldn't have to ever remove them so bending the cut piece will not fatigue the metal enough to cause a problem. You will also notice that the snipped piece does not affect how securely the brake line is held in place. Trust me and save yourself a bunch of time and hassle.

#6 alias20035

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Posted 10 November 2003 - 08:55 PM

Originally posted by nathan
It is much much easier to just snip the flat piece of metal that holds the brake line in with some bolt cutters(much easier than trying to saw or grind and you won't accidentally cut anything) do it close to the left or right then bend the tab to give yourself enough clearance to slip out the brake line. do the same with the new shocks, slip the brake line back in and bolt everything back together. I know it seems a little radical to cut your new shocks but you shouldn't have to ever remove them so bending the cut piece will not fatigue the metal enough to cause a problem. You will also notice that the snipped piece does not affect how securely the brake line is held in place. Trust me and save yourself a bunch of time and hassle.



Agreed, unless you happen to be due for a brake fluid change and have the time to do it the "official" way.....

#7 rallynutdon

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Posted 11 November 2003 - 12:42 PM

Originally posted by alias20035

Pump the brakes slowly about 10 times to push the air and some fluid in the bleed kit. When you release the brake pedal some fluid and no air should be drawn back into the brake caliper. Retighten the brake bleeder screw and reinstall the dust cap.

[/B]



I DO NOT understand the people that suggest this method and think it is very bad advise. The objective is to replace any/all fluid and/or air that is in the line between the master cylinder and slave cylinder. If you have the bleeder open and press on the brake pedal, fluid/air will be moved thru the line. When you release the pedal without closing the bleeder you draw fluid an/or air back in to the line. If conversely you do as I have been taught and do, you draw NOTHING back into the line which should be your objective.

Procedure: With bleeder closed, pump the pedal 3-4 times and hold it. You've now pressurized the line. Slowly open the bleeder until the brake pedal goes to the floor. Close the bleeder. You've now moved a "section" of fluid and/or air completely out of the system and drawn nothing back in. Repeat this several times until no air bubbles come out (or the fluid color changes if purging old/dirty fluid out of the system). The longer the line, the further away from the master cylinder ,the more times you will need to repeat this procedure. Out of curiosity, I need to read the manual and see what it says. I can't imagine any manual suggesting what I keep hearing here.

#8 Leotrp

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Posted 11 November 2003 - 01:42 PM

I really appreciate all your recommendations, but I think I’m still going to disconnect the brake lines. To be honest the brake fluid needs to be changed anyway.
Thanks again,
Leo
:wave:

#9 rallynutdon

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Posted 11 November 2003 - 10:26 PM

If you unbolt the line from the caliper, you'll have to anneal the copper washers if you plan on re using them (there's 2, one will stick to the caliper and you might not even realize it's there). If you unscrew the hose from the metal line, you may have issues after 8 years getting them off without rounding the flats and have a real mess. You can still bleed the system regardless. I wouldn't disconnect and take the risk of introducing dirt into the open system either. It's so much easier to cut the metal bracket and bend half of it out of the way and keep the system closed.

#10 hammer008

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Posted 25 August 2004 - 08:19 PM

How do you access the electrical and air hose for the Air strut...I know it is in the panel beside the rear speaker but I can't seem to figure out how to access it.



Further, what is the official way to unhook the brake line from the strut?
appreciate any help.

hammer

#11 pennswoodsed

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Posted 14 November 2005 - 10:53 PM

If you unbolt the line from the caliper, you'll have to anneal the copper washers if you plan on re using them (there's 2, one will stick to the caliper and you might not even realize it's there). If you unscrew the hose from the metal line, you may have issues after 8 years getting them off without rounding the flats and have a real mess. You can still bleed the system regardless. I wouldn't disconnect and take the risk of introducing dirt into the open system either. It's so much easier to cut the metal bracket and bend half of it out of the way and keep the system closed.


Are you familar with annealing ? Perhaps you meant something else?

#12 bork

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 10:23 PM

deleted , too old.

Edited by bork, 10 January 2012 - 10:28 PM.





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