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Rear seat belts.


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6 replies to this topic

#1 ScoobieNoobie

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Posted 13 November 2003 - 03:54 PM

Is it possible to safetly replace the 2 piece (3 point), outside seat belts in the rear of my 1989 GL Touring with the one piece (3 point) belts in the Loyal? I'm not even sure if they are in all Loyals, but I saw them in a 92. Any advice would be appreciated. The 2 piece units feel unsafe as they have become separated while driving down the street and that leaves my 3 year old with only a lap belt on until I notice and can reconnect them. It doesn't happen often, but then it doesn't need to to be a problem. Thanks again.

#2 calebz

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Posted 13 November 2003 - 04:26 PM

I would think it could be done. subaru wasn't all that imaginative in changing things, so the mounting points are probably all the same. I have been considering the same thing, as my 87 came with lap belts only.,

#3 ScoobieNoobie

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Posted 14 November 2003 - 09:34 AM

My only real concern is safety. It is my daughter after all who sits back there and I would hate to put her in any danger. I'll have to find one in a bone yard around here and check it out. If there is anyone who has actually done this, let me know how it worked out. Thanks again.

#4 TROGDOR!

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Posted 14 November 2003 - 09:56 AM

The pre-1990 rear seat belts bolt on below the rear glass and unroll from next to the back door. The 1990-up belts bolt in above the rear glass and unroll from below the rear glass.

It may be possible to fab a setup for a child seat.

I doubt the early models will have the upper bolt hole above the headliner.

But, I bet the late models take the same bolt hole to mount the seat belt spool. The upper mount for the late model belts actually does not absorb any tension from the belt- it's only there to keep the seatbelt from rubbing on people's necks. I bet you could mount the tensioner/spool from a Loyale in the lower bolt hole and just run the belt over the back of the seat. The Loyale most likely takes the same bolt hole for the outer side of the lap belt as well.

I had an 88 wagon with the same seatbelt setup that you had, and it was actually very hard for me to pop the seatbelts apart. If I remember right I could barely do it with my bare hands. Your buckles may be worn out. Check some cars in the junkyard and see if they're any tighter.

#5 ScoobieNoobie

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Posted 14 November 2003 - 02:05 PM

Thank you TROGDOR. I think that I'll have to find one locally and inspect (i.e. pull it apart and stare at it for a while). If it's as simple as bolt off/ bolt on, then I'll do it. I might also talk to the local Sub dealer and ask them if they have any ideas.

The belts are funny. If you are trying to take them apart, they are difficult to separate but then they sometimes just "seem to come apart" on thier own. I think it might have something to do with the way it rests and rubs against my daughters child seat.

#6 Flowmastered87GL

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Posted 15 November 2003 - 03:33 AM

When it comes to your kids safety... personally I will say this...

Get like a 92 loyale...

And swap the guts of your car in... then its as relaible as your car, and has the 3 pt belts of the loyale... then your kid is safe AND you have a good car :D

I'm sure you could weld in the Loyale shoulder belt mounts.... but to REALLY be safe.....

#7 brus brother

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Posted 15 November 2003 - 04:19 AM

Before I came upon the mud sloggin' head bangers on this site and potential for a Subaru afterlife, I gave up an 84 GL specifically because it only had lap belts in the rear seat and I had a young child graduating from a car seat.
Safety tests have shown that lap belts alone cause serious abdominal injuries in children potentially severing the spinal column upon impact.
While it is true that most of my generation survived a childhood devoid of seatbelts, some didn't!
So, for off roading without safety concerns for kids in the back seat, have fun in the primitive cars but when it comes to being back on the straight and narrow, best to go for the most safety you can afford. If anything happened as a result of jerry riggin' a child safety seat etc., the result could last a lifetime... NO KIDDING!




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