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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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99 Forrester timing belt


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Brus Brother_*

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 06:51 PM

What is the recommended interval for changing timing belt on a 99 Forrester? Is this a dreaded "interference" style engine where serious harm could arise from breakage of the belt? What is the record of longest ride without changing? I understand that highway miles would prolong the life so how long is a safe bet?
Thanks

#2 Guest_lothar34_*

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 08:36 PM

<blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>What is the recommended interval for changing timing belt on a 99 Forrester? Is this a dreaded "interference" style engine where serious harm could arise from breakage of the belt? What is the record of longest ride without changing? I understand that highway miles would prolong the life so how long is a safe bet?[/quote]

The manual says 105,000 miles. Yes. Probably something close to 6 years. Maybe, but that's not something I'd take a chance with. I don't know what it costs to replace broken valves and marred pistons, but I'm sure it's less than what it costs to get the timing belt replaced.

#3 Guest_WagonsOnly_*

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 11:20 PM

I'm not taking a chance with mine...The manual might say 105k but I'll be having mine done at 80k. I don't want to learn the hard way what steps should be taken to protect a $10,000 car-preventive maintenance is the best kind. And I don't want to go back to my previous daily driver (an '83 VW Rabbit, 280k mi and still running like it was brand-new: read rotten.)

#4 Guest_Dinero_*

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 06:10 AM

I drive a 99 Forester too, and yes, the 2.5 is an interference engine. IMO the microscopic increase in horse power from an inteference engine does not offset the very real possiblility of a $4,000 engine repair. People say, "If you change the timing on schedule, there's almost no risk". UNTRUE, not only can you get a defective belt, but if the water pump seizes or the belt tensioner fails you're looking a an awfully expensive repair. Could I live with a 160 HP 2.5L and not have to worry about crashing valves? I think so.

#5 Guest_1 Lucky Texan_*

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 07:38 AM

My first and last Toyota had it's belt changed on schedule - 3K miles later, halfway to another town on a trip - the tensioner seized, a brief whiff of buned rubber, then - nothing. Good thing it wasn't an interference engine BUT we had to leave it in a small town for repair and complete our trip in a rentral. VERY inconvenoent. That is why I always tell folks to change everything that is turned b y or rides on the TB when they do the service (except of course crank and cam bearings). It can save a lot of frustration later and may only increase the cost of the job by 100-200$ for waterpump,tensioer/idler/whatever. Interference engines even MORE important.
"the stingey man pays the most"

Don't make the mistake I did.

Carl
1 Lucky Texan




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