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learning more about Soobs/cars


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#1 RdNkBrt

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 10:44 AM

so since it's raining, i cant really be out tinkering..... and since my schedual is full, i dont have time to take any basic classes at the community college... i'm wondering if anyone happens to know of any good books or vids available so i can learn some more of the basics of working on our cars, aside from just reading a chilton manual....Any input would be awesome, even if it's to tell me i'm a wussy and i just need to go tinker in the rain!!!!:clap:

#2 nipper

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 10:53 AM

so since it's raining, i cant really be out tinkering..... and since my schedual is full, i dont have time to take any basic classes at the community college... i'm wondering if anyone happens to know of any good books or vids available so i can learn some more of the basics of working on our cars, aside from just reading a chilton manual....Any input would be awesome, even if it's to tell me i'm a wussy and i just need to go tinker in the rain!!!!:clap:


Depends upon your interest.
This is the book that got me started
http://cgi.ebay.com/...1QQcmdZViewItem

Its a great begineers book (audels Automobile Guide 1938), as it covers so much basic material, in a depth that nothing else covers. Yes the book is from 1938, but the basics have not changed.
I have lent my copy out to many people to get a good foundation. Granted somethings in it don't exist anymore, but for a good foundation nothing beats it. It is also a simple read, and if you like mechanical things, its fascinating.
Variablle cam timing is the only thing thats new under the sun. Ecerything else has sort of been around in one form or another since before we cranked our first car.
After you go through that book, Look for "how to care for your subaru for the complete idiot". After those two books haynes or the facotry manual will make so much more sense. I also found "how to keep your VW alive" was very good at explaining Fuel injection. VW was one of the first to put electronic fuel injection in all thier cars. It was around earlier, but theirs actually worked.

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#3 Skip

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 10:58 AM

This can be an entertaining read if you haven't already?

Thanks to Andy (B-Cuda) for posting the link
Please read the intro.
http://www.worldwidecm.com/HTKYSA.pdf



Cabin Fever here to,
but due to the fact we
have not seen temps
in double digits for almost a week.

#4 nipper

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 12:04 PM

Actually get the 1940 book.

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#5 Loyale 2.7 Turbo

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 01:37 PM

This can be an entertaining read if you haven't already?

Thanks to Andy (B-Cuda) for posting the link
Please read the intro.
http://www.worldwidecm.com/HTKYSA.pdf



Cabin Fever here to,
but due to the fact we
have not seen temps
in double digits for almost a week.


This is a "Must" for a Subaru Owner! ... (HTKYSA) is a Nice Book.



#6 robm

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 03:41 PM

I recommend "The Sports Car: Its Design and Performance" (Hardcover) by Colin Campbell.

It has a lot of good stuff on how engines and suspensions and tires work. Semi-technical. Old, but the principals are the same.

Also, "the High Speed Internal Combustion Engine" by Sir Harry Ricardo. Also old, but we are just beginning to see new innovations that he didn't/couldn't try out back in the 1930's on the newest cars. Technical, but well written, and you can ignore the numbers and just read up on the principals. (Qualitative, not quantitative.)

"The Designers" by LJK Setright is a great book, which tells a lot about the cars and the technology, as well as the people who designed them.

Any of these will get you through a rainy day!


#7 suburpy

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 05:32 PM

Hey When it gets too hot here (like 40 + celsius) i bring the work inside! My favourite is to get carbys and rebuild them (for no reason other than idle hands - well you know the rest). And really I guess an older car can do with a carby rebuild - or recently I got a weber to rebuild ready for a swap - wow these things are great, so sexy and well made and fun to work on and great on the Kitchen table when kids are trying to eat. Oh yeah and HTKYSA is great

#8 Phizinza

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 12:28 AM

Sorry, I can't really help here. I got all my knowledge from my dad and just doing things on cars. It seems now I know more then my dad about cars.

I have learn't an amazing amount about Subaru's from this forum (pretty much the only one I use as most of the others I have learn't zilch from.) But with things like the gearbox build up I found that commen sence was the only thing to get me through as there was no one anywhere on the internet I could find in the 2 months of research and questions..

Logic and commen sence FTW!

I find you also need a "need" to learn something. Like you can't just read about how a gearbox works and then know everything about it. You need you either fix it or want to upgrade it to learn how it works. I find that learning like that also stays in your memory and you won't forget it. It's pretty much the only way I seem to be able to learn things.

#9 daeron

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 01:06 AM

Sorry, I can't really help here. I got all my knowledge from my dad and just doing things on cars. It seems now I know more then my dad about cars.

I have learn't an amazing amount about Subaru's from this forum (pretty much the only one I use as most of the others I have learn't zilch from.) But with things like the gearbox build up I found that commen sence was the only thing to get me through as there was no one anywhere on the internet I could find in the 2 months of research and questions..

Logic and commen sence FTW!

I find you also need a "need" to learn something. Like you can't just read about how a gearbox works and then know everything about it. You need you either fix it or want to upgrade it to learn how it works. I find that learning like that also stays in your memory and you won't forget it. It's pretty much the only way I seem to be able to learn things.


Interesting points..

First off, I also learned virtually everything I know about cars through my father, uncle, and older brothers.. all five of us (I am #3) matured in turn by becoming the grease monkey. Some of us saw that as a chore to be avoided, but by the time we got into vehicle ownership, fixing them ourselves has been a must for ALL! :grin:

At this point, three or four of us (myself being the one on the fence) definitely know more about things than the old man in a NUMBER of ways.. One has become an ASE certified tech for like, 10 years now. AT LEAST four of us have taught my Dad a thing or two.. and he has long since learned how to learn from those that he taught.

As far as having two different kinds of "learning," you draw a line between having a "need" to learn something, and simply a desire to learn.. I hadn't thought about things quite that way, but I also divide "learning" into two kinds.. The way _I_ see it, learning by discussion, or reading, or watching a movie, etc, is more abstract than going out and actually Changing your alternator, or converting your carb'ed car to EFI, or whatever. I can only know so much about rebuilding a gearbox from reading and talking about it.. Until I actually tear one apart (probably with a need to fix it :-p) I will NOT "grok" how they function.

I am not saying I think my way of putting it is right and yours isnt, quite the contrary.. Typically, if there is a "need" to learn it, thats because it broke and you gotta fixit! :lol: BUT at the same time, it is most certainly a different mindframe with which you are absorbing the information. I have always studied thought and memory, and I find that the more you understand how your brain works, the more useful it becomes to me. Thanks for the perception from your perspective.

#10 soobscript

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 01:42 AM

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/

HTKYSA has great illustrations and wording for beginners.

#11 Phizinza

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 01:55 AM

As far as having two different kinds of "learning," you draw a line between having a "need" to learn something, and simply a desire to learn..

Yes, desiring to learn something is always a mega plus.

Basiclly, I think I'm a "have to be doing it to learn" kinda person. But if others can learn other ways, thats great, and I would like to be able to. It just never seems to stick in my head when I read a text book about something.

#12 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 01:56 AM

You just can't beat old TM 9-8000.

Army technical manual - 780 pages of goodness covering virtually everything to do with automotive mechanics.

I have a paper copy myself, but it's availible here for $6 in PDF....

http://www.chqsoftwa...products_id=497

Can't beat $6 for the valuable information in there. It covers EVERYTHING - tracked vehicles, hydraulics, turbine engines, etc, etc.

GD

#13 daeron

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 04:49 AM

Yes, desiring to learn something is always a mega plus.

Basiclly, I think I'm a "have to be doing it to learn" kinda person. But if others can learn other ways, thats great, and I would like to be able to. It just never seems to stick in my head when I read a text book about something.



Same here..

Back on topic, my Dad (who works for the local school board) obtained like 8 copies of a textbook called Principles of Automotive Mechanics from a local high school. This book covers everything, and is a FANTASTIC "all-purpose how to work on cars" book... Unfortunately, I have loaned it to a friend, who has somehow left it in a storage unit.. :rolleyes:

#14 Bucky92

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 06:51 AM

My father was an old Mopar Muscle car nut..and 50s car nut . He liked to tinker and we went to TONS of shows ( what do you expect..I grew up between Carlisle PA and Hershey PA..huge car shows and tons of dirt tracks) Motor oil is just in your blood.But I learned alot by trial and error..My first car was an 82 VW Rabbit..I got a chiltons and between that and a neighbor..I learned the basics.then over the years I just learned more and more from doing it the hands on way...books friends etc etc..then this interesting thing called the internet came along OMG!! the Holy Grail of Automotive people.It seems that hands on is the best for me..if I get into something that may be alittle over my head I have here and friends to help me through it...I dont claim to know everything..actually far from it..I try. and usually I :banghead: when I realize how easy something was. The biggest thing is to understand ,what I call,automotive theory, Why it works..if you seem to understand why it works it makes more sence of how to fix it.

#15 heartless

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 11:01 AM

most of my knowledge has come from having to do, but, before doing, i try to find reading material to get the jist of something before i actually tear into it.

my first car was a hand-me-down 73 Ford Maverick with plenty of "issues" that i had to figure out how to fix - no mechanically inclined family members to learn from either - did have a couple of freinds that knew a little, but most of it i figured out for myself. (no internet in those days!)

This board has been invaluable to me since buying my first Subaru (which i am still driving). I have learned a lot about it and how it works - things like the timing belts & little bits of information that arent in the haynes or chiltons books.
like others - i tend to learn more about something by actually getting my hands dirty doing it than just by reading about it - altho i do like to read first if possible.

#16 nipper

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 11:33 AM

My father got me started with the Audles book, even at 5 i liked the pictures. Dad was a mechanic in the navy.
After that it was every shop calss i could take (except weilding for some reason).

I miss that man.


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#17 daeron

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 04:09 AM

My father got me started with the Audles book, even at 5 i liked the pictures. Dad was a mechanic in the navy.
After that it was every shop calss i could take (except weilding for some reason).

I miss that man.


nipper


+ a billion for all the dads that ever showed their kids a wrench. :cool:

#18 86BRATMAN

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 04:23 AM

+ a billion for all the dads that ever showed their kids a wrench. :cool:


Damn right, if it weren't for my dad showing me what goes where and does what, way back when I was barely taller than the grill of the 84 wagon, I don't know where my passion would have found itself. Because of him I was inspired to work on anything and everything I could. Not always making the situation better, but thats where he would come in. And still does from time to time.

#19 heartless

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 09:18 AM

My father got me started with the Audles book, even at 5 i liked the pictures. Dad was a mechanic in the navy.
After that it was every shop calss i could take (except weilding for some reason).

I miss that man.

nipper


you guys were lucky to have a dad like that - my stepdad was a total imbecil when it came to mechanical stuff, (if something said "some assembly required" forget getting him to do it!) and being the oldest, i didnt have a sibling to learn from either. what i did have was the desire, and need, to learn, and learn i did, from whatever source i could!

#20 Bucky92

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 10:17 AM

you guys were lucky to have a dad like that - my stepdad was a total imbecil when it came to mechanical stuff, (if something said "some assembly required" forget getting him to do it!) and being the oldest, i didnt have a sibling to learn from either. what i did have was the desire, and need, to learn, and learn i did, from whatever source i could!


+ 1 on what she said....you dont realize how lucky you are to have great parents...or even ones that paid attention to you.

The person who I call my Dad is in no way related by any means to me..sometimes family is who you make it...not just related by blood.

#21 daeron

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 08:25 PM

+ 1 on what she said....you dont realize how lucky you are to have great parents...or even ones that paid attention to you.

The person who I call my Dad is in no way related by any means to me..sometimes family is who you make it...not just related by blood.



Amen to that, my best friend's older sister is really only his half-sister.. mom was pregnant with sister when she married his dad, and his dad has been her dad in every single way but biologically.. and it is an impressive thing to say the least.

On the other hand, I also have a lady friend whose father passed away at a young age, she was the older of two kids, and she has taken the motivation to learn just as you had, heartless. I am currently helping her with the front clip on her volvo.. shes done rust repairs on her honda accord, and she actually taught me how to recharge an AC system because I had never done it.. I've lived without car AC most of my life :rolleyes:

You simply have to understand that when we thank our dads for this, it is with the concept in mind that we were given this HUGE head start over those of you who had to figure it out yourselves... and we all feel an immense debt of gratitude to an army of old men that we love, and some of us miss dearly.

We oughta give those guys their own holiday or something... :grin:

#22 waimaks

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 02:08 AM

I've learnt most of what I know from my father also, watching/helping him work on and with farm equipment, and having him to explain things to me when I don't understand them.
I agree that the need and desire to learn is also helpful, now working in the automotive field, I end up asking my workmates lots of questions and chatting to them about different principles and things. Its a good feeling understanding something new like that.

Its even better when you get a practical opportunity though. With some kind of explaination and help when/if its needed.


Its good now being able to explain some new things to my dad now for a change, been a while since he did his training...

Also, you guys here on teh innan3ts are an awesome resourse. Thanks to all the technically minded people willing to stop for a minute and explain something or lend a hand!
:)

#23 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 04:39 AM

On the other hand, I learned mostly about construction and wood-working from my father. He was a C-130 mechanic in the Chair Force, but my parents have been lucky about cars, and when they did have problems they were taken to shops. Never even changed their own oil. Basically my dad *could* work on them but doesn't care to. His medium is wood, has been for many years now, and he has no desire to pick up a wrench at this point.

My grandfather was the one that always changed his own oil, etc. But never much more than that - due to being older by the time I came along, and haveing a decent car that was rarely driven we never once did anything car related. I learned about fixing small appliances, welding, soldering, and various power tools and metal-working from him though. And we occasionally worked on the ignition or carburator for the tiller or lawnmower, etc. And I was always fasinated by his stories of youth when he and his brother built a tractor for the farm from a model A truck, and his years as a welding forman for the ship-yards, etc.

Really though what I got that was valuable from both of them was the *idea* that I could actually do things (myself). There was never a time when I saw either of them admit defeat in the face of a challenging project. I watched my father and grandfather construct various projects, remodel houses, repair frozen pipes, install water heaters, unclog drains, plant large gardens , etc, etc. Stuff that most people would never even attempt. What I got was a fearless attitude toward anything tool related. I was encouraged to take things apart to see how they worked as the slogan around my house was "Well - it's already broken so I probably can't make it much worse".

As a young lad I spent months in the summers buying lawn mowers and other equipment from the city dump (I actually aquired a salvage license though the county), rebuilding their engines, repainting, and eventually selling them at garage and estate sales (mother is an antique dealer). At $20 each scrap metal value from the dump, I could make a decent profit selling them for $100 after making (usually minor) engine repairs and investing a few $$ in spray paint. Pretty much taught myself everything I know about internal combustion engines by reading everything I could get my hands on. I've read many technical manuals cover to cover for FUN.

So really, I credit my family with giving me the mental *tools* to learn the stuff on my own. There's no question I know vastly more than anyone else in my family about cars in general (my father enlists MY assistance for anything vehicular). But they gave me the attitude, the enjoyment of reading and learning, and the confidence to tackle any job.

GD

#24 nipper

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 11:56 AM

My Fathers father was a plumber, my father was an airforce mechaninc in ww2 and a jack of all trades (though some of his fixes were amusing). i am an automotive engineer, and love working with my hands.
Going back beyond my grand father, men in general just had to know how to do things, and there were a lot less things to fix.
Sadly the line ends with me. I am not having kids any time soon, and my brothers kids can't stand get thier hands dirty.
Maybe thats why i like to explain things so much here, it gives me a outlet.

nipper

#25 RdNkBrt

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 02:03 PM

my dad doesnt know how to change a tire...... i had to change one for him when i was 13..... good stuff




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