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Timing Belt 1998 Outback


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15 replies to this topic

#1 [HTi]Johnson

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 04:12 AM

Hello all. I have a 1998 Outback Ltd. Wagon. It has the 2.5l DOHC engine. I'm going to do the timing belt and front seals (front and the four cams) this weekend. ANy suggestions on what to do or not do. I'm paranoid about the cams spinning when the belt isn't on. Thanks.

-Justin.

#2 GLCraig

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 04:16 AM

You might as well replace the water pump while you are that deep into everything. Also inspect all of the idler pulleys.

#3 mattocs

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 06:32 AM

You'll probably break part of the timing belt cover where the bolt/screw goes in. Soak it down with WD40 or something a couple days in advance and the screw/bolt should come out a lot easier.

#4 weddes05

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 08:59 AM

Just put it at TDC before you pull it apart and you have nothing to worry about. All of the pistons are retracted so if you spin the cams absolutely nothing will happen.

#5 mnwolftrack

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 10:07 AM

"Usually" the new belts have the timing marks on them to match up to the crank/cam markers. Not always though. Even if they don't, you can make your own. What I like to do is rotate everything into position per proper procedure, then mark with a dab of paint or marker on the belt and on the gears or whereever the alignment indicators are, and remove the old belt. Then I tape the two new belts together side by side so that the teeth are aligned, then I transfer the paint markings to the new belt. Then installation is simple--just alighn the marks you just made. Make sure to make the paint marks thin enough so that it isn't possible to confuse yourself on which tooth on the gear to align the belt mark.

#6 Skip

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 10:27 AM

Ah this is not so true, one must be careful with
internet information.
"Just put it at TDC before you pull it apart and you have nothing to worry about.
All of the pistons are retracted so if you spin the cams absolutely nothing will happen.
"

He is not correct about TDC - it is not the position used for belt changing and
will leave the #1 and #2 in a position where the valves can hit the pistons.

The position for belt changing does leave the piston in a position half way through their
respective travel ...
but....
The valves will hit each other if the cams on the head are turned.

The tensioner needs to be compressed in a special way.

Holding the cams on each head in proper position
needs a special tool or lots of care.

The crank shaft bolt torque is wrong in many articles
FHI changed it to 125 ft-lbs.

There are several very good "End Wrench" articles for you
to read first.

Links have been posted and no doubt found in one of the
"Similar Threads" shown on the lower portion of this page.

#7 johnceggleston

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 11:19 AM

Holding the cams on each head in proper position
needs a special tool or lots of care.


anyone have a picture of this tool. would it be hard to fabricate?

#8 Skip

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 11:52 AM

John,
Here is the link to the End wrench art.
The tool is pictured on page 14 of the art.
(page 4 on the .pdf file)

End Wrench 2.5L timing belt change

#9 johnceggleston

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 12:33 PM

John,
Here is the link to the End wrench art.
The tool is pictured on page 14 of the art.
(page 4 on the .pdf file)

End Wrench 2.5L timing belt change


thanks, very helpful. but the more i read the more i think 2.2L engines are my limit. between tools and potential damage.... 2.5's are too risky for me.

#10 porcupine73

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 09:23 PM

If I were doing the dohc I'd use the cam locking tool. But my understanding is as long as you line up the timing marks per the service manual before removing the old belt, if the cams snap, they will tend to snap in a direction away from damage so you can turn them back to where they came from when putting the new belt on.

#11 Bserk

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Posted 16 February 2007 - 09:53 PM

I did my 96 2.5 dohc a few weeks back, no special tools, no problem. It was out of the car, which helps a lot, and I have experiance with other timing belts. But I considered it no biggie. The odd thing for me, working from Nissan experiance, is that you do not set it at TDC, as Skip said... and Im sure thats to prevent piston/valve interferance if things move a bit (and they did, with me) I was doing head gaskets, etc along with the TB and I bought all genuine Subie stuff. The Subie belt has all the marks, why take a chance? The tensioner, while also very similar to me (it works exactly like the one on a dohc VG Nissan engine from a 300ZX, if anyone is interested), is not rocket science. You have to compress it, I used a large bench vice, and pin it so it stays compressed until you have everything back together and aligned. Maybe Im over-simplifying things, I do have an advantage working in the field, but if you are into doing it yourself, I wouldnt let the DOHC scare you off. My 2 cents, again

#12 balou

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 08:10 PM

ok read all this (after experiencing trouble of course), when I took the belt off (1998 DHOC 2.5L outback) the driver side cam pulleys spun.  moved them back to position and everything appeared to be in the correct spots turned the crank over by hand several rotations and the marks don't appear to line up perfect and I am concerned about damaging valves etc.  need to go back to square one and be sure everything is in the correct position (crank/valves) what would be the best way to go about this?  thanks yodas



#13 AdventureSubaru

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 09:19 PM

Double check your marks. Count the teeth. Remain patient. You'll get there. Did similarly on a SOHC 2.5 last year. Retrace your steps.

 

 

Just in case you weren't already aware, don't go by the arrow on the crankshaft, go for the line.



#14 upnorthguy

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 07:39 AM

 turned the crank over by hand several rotations and the marks don't appear to line up perfect 

 

Once you start turning the crank (even a few rotations) the timing marks will not line up again for a long time.



#15 johnceggleston

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 05:29 PM

Once you start turning the crank (even a few rotations) the timing marks "on the belt" will not line up again for a long time.

the marks on the belt are not timing marks.

they are only there to AID in the installation.

 

the timing marks are on the rear of the crank sprocket and the front of the cam sprockets.

 

good luck.



#16 MilesFox

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 09:51 PM

Just put it at TDC before you pull it apart and you have nothing to worry about. All of the pistons are retracted so if you spin the cams absolutely nothing will happen.

What he meant to say is "put it at the hash mark on the crank (woodruff key at 6 o'clock) so that the pistons are at the center of their bore"

 

TDC is never used for subaru timing belts. This is what the arrows are for. And Never use the arrows. Never the arrows.






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