Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Cooling Fans blowing fuses


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 briang@wybron.com

briang@wybron.com

    New User

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • Colorado Springs

Posted 11 June 2007 - 05:20 PM

Hi, I have a 1998 Subaru Legacy outback, 2.5

When driving in town today I noticed it started to overheat. I pulled over and found that neither cooling fan in front of the radiator was working. I pulled the fuse cover under the hood and the fuse for the fan on the drivers side was blown. I replaced it and that fan worked. I looked under the dash and found the fuse for the passengers side fan was blown. I replaced that one and was on my way. I just got home from work and I popped the hood and neither fan was working. I checked the fuses and they were both blown again.

Any ideas?

What do these two fans have in common with each other that would blow both fuses?

Thanks in advance!

#2 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 4,920 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 11 June 2007 - 05:47 PM

Hmm...a couple easy things to check would be do the fans spin freely by hand? Also could pull the connector and try powering the fan right off the battery with a fused jumper wire and an ammeter in series. Many multimeters can read only up to 10 amps; not sure if the fans take more than that....

#3 nipper

nipper

    Semi Elite Master of the

  • Members
  • 17,557 posts
  • Long Island NY

Posted 11 June 2007 - 05:52 PM

Any work recently done to the car?

Before you do what was suggested, take an ohm meter and see if there is a dead short to ground at the motors. NExt check the relays to see if they are shorted. This is an unusal circumstance, but it sounds like a dead short. There isnt much to the system, so as long as no harnesses are pinched,should be easy to find.


nipper

#4 Cougar

Cougar

    Elite Master of the Subaru

  • Members
  • 6,340 posts
  • Anchorage

Posted 11 June 2007 - 08:47 PM

What size fuses are you using to run the fans? Maybe they are the wrong size. It is stange that both fans are blowing the fuse. If the RPMs of the motors are being slowed down somehow that will cause extra current to flow in the fan circuit.

Nipper: If there was a direct short in the motor or to it then the fan wouldn't run and the fuse would blow instantly. The voltage across a short is zero.

#5 nipper

nipper

    Semi Elite Master of the

  • Members
  • 17,557 posts
  • Long Island NY

Posted 11 June 2007 - 08:50 PM

What size fuses are you using to run the fans? Maybe they are the wrong size. It is stange that both fans are blowing the fuse. If the RPMs of the motors are being slowed down somehow that will cause extra current to flow in the fan circuit.

Nipper: If there was a direct short in the motor or to it then the fan wouldn't run and the fuse would blow instantly. The voltage across a short is zero.


Yes and no, i should have said slowly turn the fan as you have the meter connected. Can be a bad winding in the motor.

Also one thing ive learned in too many years of working with electricity. Electricity failed electrical theory and on occasion can do weird things :)

nipper




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users