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Replacing the power steering oil


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10 replies to this topic

#1 rverdoold

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 01:13 PM

As the title describes, how can i replace the power steering oil?
I have read that there is no need to replace it, just fill it up until the indication marks. But the oil is amber orange to yellow while it should be red (like the transmission oil) and it smells bad and a bit burned as well. It is there all its 15.5 years and only added a little bit.
Last time i was in the mountains and while backing up a hilly road, including some maximum steering there was this smell. Since the 4EAT uses the same oil i dont know which one it was giving the smell around the car. The gearbox oil is nice and red after it was replaced 10k miles ago.
Car is '91 legacy 2l 4eat.

#2 Skip

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 01:49 PM

Never had to do it but here is an idea.

Disconnect the return line to the res.

Plug the port in the res.

Place line in a container in a position where you
can see the out put.

Start car and pour new PS fluid in the res. as old pumps out.

When old coming out looks like new stop and reconnect
the line.

No chance of getting air in the system.

Same way an auto trans is flushed.

#3 rverdoold

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 02:07 PM

Never had to do it but here is an idea.

Disconnect the return line to the res.

Plug the port in the res.

Place line in a container in a position where you
can see the out put.

Start car and pour new PS fluid in the res. as old pumps out.

When old coming out looks like new stop and reconnect
the line.

No chance of getting air in the system.

Same way an auto trans is flushed.


Sounds really interesting, will check it and give it a go

#4 grossgary

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 02:49 PM

i noticed some hex plugs on a steering rack the other week. pretty sure you could probably unscrew those. might have to remove the jack plate to see if there's access from underneath.

turning the rack lock to lock pushes a lot of fluid out. so disconnecting the lines is probably a good way to go. i'd think disconnect the return line down by the rack, disconnect the other line at the pump.

then you would also have the option to refill the rack through the pressure hose at the pump and flush it two or three times to get all of it out...kind of like doing an ATF refill in the trans.

#5 porcupine73

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 03:50 PM

Cool info on those hex plugs. Skip's method will work. I would not try to start the vehicle and pour fluid in as it pumps out though. I did this on my '96 with a helper and it pumped it as fast as I could pour it in - i.e. it was sucking air. The pumps move more fluid at low rpm than hi rpm I believe.

There is an article on EndWrench about flushing. They recommend use of a cleaner to get varnish out (weird-usually Subaru doesn't like flushes and additives). I've been using seafoam transtune on my units as a flush.

After I've got the return hose in a jug, I use a cordless drill with a rubber cap on the chuck to drive the steering pump. This gives nice control over the fluid rate so you can keep up with pouring it in.

And you probably already know it wants Dexron type ATF, not power steering fluid.

Power Steering Fluid Flushing:
http://endwrench.com...7FebPowerEW.pdf

#6 nipper

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 08:41 PM

Be careful about those hex plugs. They may have check balls behind them.

Another method, neater but a little more painstaking, is using a large syrange. Suck out the resivoir, refill, start the car, turn wheel left then right, and repeat 5 times.

nipper

#7 rverdoold

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 07:20 AM

Be careful about those hex plugs. They may have check balls behind them.

Another method, neater but a little more painstaking, is using a large syrange. Suck out the resivoir, refill, start the car, turn wheel left then right, and repeat 5 times.

nipper


Thanks nipper, was thinking of that as well since i work in a laboratory there is plenty of syringes or other things that can remove liquids from beakers or what ever.

#8 WoodsWagon

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 10:27 PM

Be careful about those hex plugs. They may have check balls behind them.

Another method, neater but a little more painstaking, is using a large syrange. Suck out the resivoir, refill, start the car, turn wheel left then right, and repeat 5 times.

nipper


This is the method we use at work when we sell a power steering flush. It's a machine with a new fluid bottle, an old fluid tank, and two pumps. You throw a hose in the resavaur, suck out the old fluid, fill it back up with new at the press of a button, start the car and move the steering lock to lock, then repeat. The cool part is that the fresh fluid and old fluid hoses are clear and run right next to each other, so you can compare the fluid color.

#9 grossgary

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Posted 16 June 2007 - 12:46 PM

i would use nippers method, rack fittings/lines are annoying.

#10 rverdoold

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 02:51 PM

i would use nippers method, rack fittings/lines are annoying.

Just did it using hose and large syring. Was able to remove about 450 to 480 ml (from 'hot max' while hot). Refilled it and drove seems fine no big differences though. Only oil taken out was ver dark red and not clear. Replaced with D2 ATF oil. Anybody any idea how much oil the system holds so i can calculate the change ratio.

#11 MDW25gt

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 06:35 PM

Thanks nipper, was thinking of that as well since i work in a laboratory there is plenty of syringes or other things that can remove liquids from beakers or what ever.


Turkey baster would work. This sounds like an easy way to do it.




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