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DIY Clutch replacement?


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17 replies to this topic

#1 forester2002s

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Posted 31 October 2007 - 10:20 PM

The clutch on my car (2002 Forester 5MT, 100,000km) is slipping, and needs replacement.

I am considering doing the job myself in my garage. I have good tools, and I could rent an engine-hoist.

Is it feasible to do the job myself (I have previously done the clutch on another non-Subaru FWD transverse-engine car)? And how long should I expect to take for this job?

Does the engine have to come right out? Or can it simply slide forward if I remove the radiator?

And should I also be replacing any other components at the same time (timing-belt, water pump)?

The car has always had 'clutch-judder' when starting from cold, but this has always disappeared when the engine warms up. I recall some mention of a special clutch-kit that cures clutch-judder, but I can't find it on the forum using the search function. Anyone know the part-number for this kit.

Any advice would be welcome.

#2 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 05:01 AM

I usually do it without pulling the engine, but I own a hoist so I use that to take the weight off the engine and lift it forward and back again.

On the older EA81's and such the engine's are so light that it's easy to just pull them forward. But later model engines are heavier and might not be as easy to manhandle.

If you have a garage you might just buy a chain hoist from harbor frieght to take the brunt of the load....

Or two guys with a chain wrapped around a 4x4 bit of lumber works too - they lift and someone else pulls and jiggles.

GD

#3 uniberp

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 05:27 PM

The clutch on my car (2002 Forester 5MT, 100,000km) is slipping, and needs replacement.

I am considering doing the job myself in my garage. I have good tools, and I could rent an engine-hoist.

Is it feasible to do the job myself (I have previously done the clutch on another non-Subaru FWD transverse-engine car)? And how long should I expect to take for this job?

Does the engine have to come right out? Or can it simply slide forward if I remove the radiator?

And should I also be replacing any other components at the same time (timing-belt, water pump)?

The car has always had 'clutch-judder' when starting from cold, but this has always disappeared when the engine warms up. I recall some mention of a special clutch-kit that cures clutch-judder, but I can't find it on the forum using the search function. Anyone know the part-number for this kit.

Any advice would be welcome.


You can also drop the tranny, which allows you to avoid draining coolant.

I used a Harbor Freight scissors type tranny jack for my auto. The tranny stays under the car, behind the crossmember.

With the car on tall jackstands, its not bad working from underneath, and not so far to lean in when working from the top.

Uses less floorspace that way, and less chance of banging into bodywork.

See the NASIOC threads on changing separator plate for pics.

#4 grossgary

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 06:25 AM

But later model engines are heavier and might not be as easy to manhandle.

yeah, they're really heavy. you do not want to be needing to lift/move those very much even if you're massively in shape, athletic, adrenaline, drunk, crazy...etc.

working under is the annoying part, but the transmission comes out way faster than the engine if you work from underneath. someone else uses an engine lift, through the engine bay to drop the trans. use the lift to take the load off and maneuver the trans through the space between the engine and transmission. i'd like to try a trans jack, like he mentioned and see how well that works, but haven't had the opportunity yet.

#5 uniberp

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 08:56 AM

yeah, they're really heavy. you do not want to be needing to lift/move those very much even if you're massively in shape, athletic, adrenaline, drunk, crazy...etc.

working under is the annoying part, but the transmission comes out way faster than the engine if you work from underneath. someone else uses an engine lift, through the engine bay to drop the trans. use the lift to take the load off and maneuver the trans through the space between the engine and transmission. i'd like to try a trans jack, like he mentioned and see how well that works, but haven't had the opportunity yet.


To support and adjust the angle of the engine during removal, I used a ~4 foot 2x4 supported by 2 shorter lengths of 2x4 upright on the 'frame rails', nex to the abs unit and behind the battery. Then use a hook bolt through the AC bracket, and wrenched the nut to move the engine fron up and down. I was a bit nervous about putting the weight right on the fender lip, not wanting to damage the panels, so I used the 2x4 uprights to take the wieght instead.

Working underneath has advantages, like when you are tired, you're already laying down.

#6 mellow65

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 06:44 PM

i have recently swapped a tranny and swapped an engine and the engine was quicker to swap out.

now true with the tranny i had to make a run to napa for heli coils for the exhaust bolts, but still took less time to pull the motor. and with out a lift or something crawling around on my back trying to man handle a tranny out is much tougher then working from above pulling the motor.

and i always find putting the motor back in and lining up the input shaft is much easier with the motor hanging from a hoist rather then a tranny on your chest trying to muscle it back in.

just my 2ยข

#7 roger1

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 09:24 PM

[quote See my post tonight-- Noise when clutch is pressed in. I also have a engine leveler on the hoist which helps getting things lined up. Again with engine out you can do the other things much easier Good luck! It took two of us 2 days to get it back on road, some of that was getting pulleys and camseals that we hadn't purchased originally.. We are almost at the end of the world here and had to go 35 miles to Santa Fe or 90 miles to ABQ for parts

#8 jib

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 01:40 PM

The car has always had 'clutch-judder' when starting from cold, but this has always disappeared when the engine warms up. I recall some mention of a special clutch-kit that cures clutch-judder, but I can't find it on the forum using the search function. Anyone know the part-number for this kit.

Any advice would be welcome.


The clutch was redesigned somewhere around 2003 to eliminate the judder, so a stock clutch system will be better. Mine was replaced under warantee and while the judder was gone, that nasty smell was evident if the clutch needed to be slipped.

While I have done any conclusive research yet (I have about 70k miles on the warantee replaced clutch), there are some good OEM type aftermarket clutch packages that might work for you.

Jack

Jack

#9 forester2002s

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 06:29 PM

Well, I bit the bullet and took my Forester in to an indie for a clutch replacement.

It cost me $902 including machining the flywheel. Same day service (4.5-h labour) and no hassle.
(I had two other quotes: $1,000 + taxes from another indie, and $1,200 + taxes from a Subaru dealership).

I had been considering doing the work myself; but I needed to either buy or rent a transmission-jack, and it would have taken me 2-days minimum working on my own. So I gave in. I must be getting soft in my old age. But the job is done.

#10 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 10:49 PM

Could have bought an engine hoist for that much. Mine was $199 at Harbor Freight. Would have still saved a bundle.

I don't ever pull transmissions if I can help it. I always pull the engines on Subaru's. I'll pull transmission on transverse cars, but that's it.

I've *replaced* plenty of transmisisons on Subaru's, and I can tell you from experience that engines are ALWAYS faster.

GD

#11 kornkobjak

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 11:13 AM

About to give it a whirl in my 02 Forester. Just can't decide whether to go under and take the transmission route or up top and pull or slide forward the engine. I see cases for both.



#12 MilesFox

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 12:28 PM

Pulling the engine allows more access and the chance do do baffle seal and valve covers, do the timing system if you like. Aur bubble in cooing system can be difficult to burp.

 

Pulling the transmission saves you from having to open the cooling system. But you have to remove wheels and loosen the strut-to knuckle to allow for removing the axles, then the shifter, then the y-pipe or its donut flange. gear oil is messier than coolant

 

opinion: Motor is easier to undo since you are above instead of below it. Trans only makes sense if you have a lift.

 

Plus, with my experience, pulling the trans allows for the motor to pitch forward, making re-install difficult, especially for MT. The last time i did this i had to shove blocks of wood and a nintendo game boy between the motor and the radiator to get the pitch right. (i elected to pull the trans since i was swapping between 2 cars back and forth)

 

I can understand pulling the trans for lack of an engine hoist. Take the time to source an engine hoist and you will be much happier.



#13 grossgary

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 12:54 PM

Transmission can definitely come out easier and quicker - fewer items to disconnect, no coolant to deal with.

 

Pulling engine is much simpler/easier in nearly every way though.

 

If you have lots of energy, a get-r-done atittude no matter what, don't get easily frustrated, don't mind crawling in and out from under the car (or planning ahead helps) every time you need a socket, part, rag, and don't mind lying on your back and wrestling in confined spaces on a frigid concrete floor while rust and dirt falls in your eyes and your nose is black when you blow it when you're done, and you're allowed free reign of any language necessary to get the job done....then pulling the transmission can be quicker and not require a lift.  but there's a lot of reasons to hate working on your back, so pulling the engine is ideal for most people.



#14 Gloyale

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 01:13 PM



and i always find putting the motor back in and lining up the input shaft is much easier with the motor hanging from a hoist rather then a tranny on your chest trying to muscle it back in.

 

 

A tranny jack or even a floor jack will help with this.

 

Pulling engine is much simpler/easier in nearly every way though.

 

I completely disagree.

 

You can buy a creeper and a trans jack cheaper than an engine hoist.

 

No fuel lines to disconnect....no lose of coolant.....no need to even remove the y-pipe on later models....

 

But it does come down to personal circumstances and preferences.  Some people cannot stand being under a car.....me I can't stand doing extra unneeded steps.



#15 kornkobjak

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 02:33 PM

Thanks guys. Looks like I have plenty of pros and cons in both hands. I appreciate it. Getting started in the morning. I'm sure you'll hear from me soon. Thanks again.



#16 kornkobjak

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 12:27 PM

On the axle nuts, is the one on the passenger side reverse thread? The driver's side is standard thread but the passenger side is stubborn and before I really put pressure on it, I'd like to know I'm putting pressure in the right direction. Thanks......Jak.



#17 MilesFox

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 12:36 PM

The axle is not reverse thread. It is torqued to some 135-145 torque. good luck



#18 kornkobjak

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 05:07 PM

Dudes! I just drove it out of the garage. Many thanks for the advice. I went under and removed the transmission. Should I smell a mild burning smell or anything when I first start driving it? Please say yes.






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