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how to seat your torque converter , by mnwolftrack


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25 replies to this topic

#1 johnceggleston

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 12:54 PM

how to seat your torque converter , by mnwolftrack (copied from http://www.ultimates...61&postcount=64 )

First Photo:

Here's a picture of the first stopping point when sliding the torque converter into the transmission (assuming it had been completely removed). The first stopping point can vary a little bit, so don't be too concerned if yours stops in a slightly different spot. Note that I drew a black marker line on the torque converter flange where the mounting bolts go. This line represents what would be the "fully seated" position of the flange when comparing the flange to the front mounting surface of the transmission when looking square at the side of the transmission (e.g. front mounting surface of transmission is perfectly in line with your line of site).

As this picture shows, the torque converter is not fully seated yet, as shown by the black line (straight up and down) on the flange which is roughly an inch away from the front mounting surface of the transmission:

Posted Image

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Second Photo:

From here, I make a "fishhook" with my pointer finger on one hand and suspend the tip of the torque converter in the "hook" to hold it's weight as if it were fully seated. This helps prevent the torque converter from binding when trying to seat it (makes seating easier). Then, I spin the torque converter clockwise a few times and then counter clock wise a few times to see if it will catch to get to the second stopping point (if a few spins don't do it, I do a few more. If it's still a no go, I pull the torque converter back out and put it back in in a different position). Here's a picture of the second stopping point (easiliy confused for fully seated), in which the black marker line is still about 1/4-1/2 inch away from being flush with mounting flange:

Posted Image

If you think the torque converter is fully seated (above photo) at the second stopping point, it's NOT! It needs to go another 1/4 to 1/2 inch.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Third Photo:

To get the torque converter to fully seat, I spin in the opposite direction that just did that got it to seat in the 2nd stopping point. Then, when fully seated, it will look like this:

Posted Image


------------------------------------------------------------------------

Forth Photo:

Another angle of it fully seated, line of site no longer flush with transmission mounting surface, and you can see the black marker line a little better:

Posted Image


------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fifth Photo:

Yet another angle, fully seated:

Posted Image

#2 mnwolftrack

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 03:11 PM

well look at that, you beat me to it! Thanks!

#3 johnceggleston

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 02:18 PM

well look at that, you beat me to it! Thanks!


i was afraid it might not be seen in the other thread, thanks for the great pics and the description.

#4 uniberp

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 12:44 PM

how to seat your torque converter , by mnwolftrack (copied from http://www.ultimates...61&postcount=64 )


Heres' my pics.

This one shows the ring seal that slipped out of the groove on the TC shaft and prevented complete insertion of the TC pas that last .25 inch. I recommend getting a new part, since the old one gets floppy and slips out of the groove.Posted Image
Thi sis the new part in a bag with number:
Posted Image
This is the correct placement of the TC looking at the bottom:
Posted Image

You can see how it matches the cutaways.

#5 Kilroy

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 03:17 PM

This needs to be stickied!! Great post and awesome photos, thanks guys!

:clap: :headbang: :clap: :headbang: :clap:

#6 mnwolftrack

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 04:54 PM

Yes, it probably would be a good idea to sticky. Only trouble with my pictures is I don't know how long photobucket will let me keep them up there. It would probably be better if we could upload them into this site or somewhere more permanent.

#7 Kilroy

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 06:18 PM

I've been using 'Village Photos' to host my sig on various forums for about 4 years. As long as you log in once every 60 days, they stay active. They send you an email a week before the 60 day period if you haven't logged in.

#8 eagleb

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 12:25 PM

What type of symptoms would be present (post re-assembly) if the torque converter isn't fully seated?

#9 grossgary

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 12:34 PM

probably some noises and a transmission that eventually won't move. it won't last long, if they're all the same the oil pump in the transmission gets crushed, so no pressure and no moving.

#10 pearlm30

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 07:05 PM

Very nice. Thanks a lot guys!!!:banana: :headbang:

#11 johnceggleston

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 06:50 PM

bump for newbies.

howtoseattorqueconverter
torqueconverter
seatingtorqueconverter


#12 john in KY

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:21 PM

What type of symptoms would be present (post re-assembly) if the torque converter isn't fully seated?


Only one: shaft presses against the internal oil pump and destroys it. No pump=no ATF circulating=no movement. Been there, done that.

#13 Turbone

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:37 PM

bump for newbies.

howtoseattorqueconverter
torqueconverter
seatingtorqueconverter


^^If this is a link, its not working. Neither is the green color, can barley see it.

Only one: shaft presses against the internal oil pump and destroys it. No pump=no ATF circulating=no movement. Been there, done that.


Ditto :-\

#14 BluetoE

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 12:58 AM

This post came in very handy today! I was able to check out the pic and determine that my TC stayed in place. Thanks so much!

#15 uniberp

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 06:48 AM

Again, here's my pics.

This one shows the ring seal that slipped out of the groove on the TC shaft and prevented complete insertion of the TC pas that last .25 inch. I recommend getting a new part, since the old one gets floppy and slips out of the groove.

http://www.ultimates...0&pictureid=979
Posted Image
This is the new part in a bag with number:

http://www.ultimates...0&pictureid=977
Posted Image
This is the correct placement of the TC looking at the bottom:

http://www.ultimates...0&pictureid=978
Posted Image

You can see how it matches the cutaways.[/quote]

#16 johnceggleston

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 06:13 AM

this thread loses a lot of it's effectiveness without the pics in the first post, too bad.

mnwolftrack hasn't been on the board since 2008. if anyone happens to know him, how about telling him we need his torque converter pics.

they were great pics.

Edited by johnceggleston, 14 May 2010 - 06:44 AM.


#17 johnceggleston

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 08:56 PM

the original pics are gone so i have added some that i took today. not perfect pics but better than none. if i get better ones while i can still edit i will add them.

how to seat your torque converter , by mnwolftrack (copied from http://www.ultimates...61&postcount=64 )

torque converter not seated.
Posted Image

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Below is a picture of the first stopping point when sliding the torque converter into the transmission (assuming it had been completely removed). The first stopping point can vary a little bit, so don't be too concerned if yours stops in a slightly different spot.

As this picture shows, the torque converter is not fully seated yet, the flange which is roughly an inch away from the front mounting surface of the transmission:

Posted Image

------------------------------------------------------------------------


From here, I make a "fishhook" with my pointer finger on one hand and suspend the tip of the torque converter in the "hook" to hold it's weight as if it were fully seated. This helps prevent the torque converter from binding when trying to seat it (makes seating easier). Then, I spin the torque converter clockwise a few times and then counter clock wise a few times to see if it will catch to get to the second stopping point (if a few spins don't do it, I do a few more. If it's still a no go, I pull the torque converter back out and put it back in in a different position). Here's a picture of the second stopping point (easliy confused for fully seated) :

Posted Image
second stop pic below:
Posted Image

If you think the torque converter is fully seated (above photo) at the second stopping point, it's NOT! It needs to go another 1/4 to 1/2 inch.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

To get the torque converter to fully seat, I spin in the opposite direction that just did that got it to seat in the 2nd stopping point. Then, when fully seated, it will look like this: (notice how close the face of the flange is compared to the engine mating face of the trans.)

Posted Image


------------------------------------------------------------------------


Another angle of it fully seated, line of site no longer flush with transmission mounting surface, and you can see the black marker line a little better:

Posted Image


------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yet another angle, fully seated:

Posted Image

tagline: ''seat torqueconverter''

Edited by johnceggleston, 12 March 2011 - 09:00 PM.


#18 Chefasaurus

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 01:16 PM

A million thank you's for this! I was stuck at the 2nd stopping point for 2 days! Read through this, pulled it off, tried again, and boom, it clunked into place, all 3 times. I put a zip-tie (the kind used for mounting oil coolers or electric fans to a radiator) through one of the mounting holes, and out through a hole on the back of the bellhousing.

#19 GeneralDisorder

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 01:32 PM

One thing to note is that some of the newer stuff has a "clip" of sorts on the oil pump drive shaft that has to seat into one of the two drive slots on the TC... it only fits properly into ONE of them and not the other. This means that if the TC has come out of the tranny you need to first fish out the oil pump drive shaft and seat it onto the TC and then install both of them as an assembly. Why they have this extra clip I do not know - but it's there any should be checked for if you have something from the later 90's and beyond. I just encountered this on a '99 Forester with a factory rebuilt tranny in it.

GD

#20 987687

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 05:15 PM

I always tell people they know the TQ is seated when the distance from the mounting ears to the tranny bell housing is LESS than the distance of the mounting holes in the flex plate to the engine bell housing.

#21 MilesFox

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 11:39 PM

I would advise not to remove the torque converter if it is not necessary, other than a bad seal or disassembly of the trans. It would be the preferred method to leave the torque converter with the trans when pulling an engine for other services.

#22 mercuryrising17

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 02:53 PM

I have an 02 legacy and the tx slipped out just a little when removing the engine. I was able to slip it right back into place and when I manually turn the tx I can hear fluid slushing around. Am I safe to assume that everything is in place and I can bolt the engine back on?

#23 987687

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 03:50 PM

I have an 02 legacy and the tx slipped out just a little when removing the engine. I was able to slip it right back into place and when I manually turn the tx I can hear fluid slushing around. Am I safe to assume that everything is in place and I can bolt the engine back on?


As I said further back:
I always tell people they know the TQ is seated when the distance from the mounting ears to the tranny bell housing is LESS than the distance of the mounting holes in the flex plate to the engine bell housing.

Since the tq is half full of fluid, yes, it'll slosh a bit. That's normal. If it turns freely and passes the above check, you should be fine.

#24 AdventureSubaru

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 11:20 PM

Having just done this for the first time, if you follow the steps outlined in this thread, you should have no trouble. First timer, done in 3 minutes. Here's another way to see that it's in place. Look at the torque converter through the hole in the bell housing for the starter. There should be less than 1/8 of an inch between torque converter and the bell housing.

Posted Image

Here's a shot for a little extra help. This is a 2000 Outback. The rim of the torque converter was just under 3/16 of an inch from the bell housing.

Posted Image

Edited by AdventureSubaru, 25 January 2012 - 02:26 PM.


#25 Whitedog

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 04:37 PM

That wasn't bad at all. The thing i think of when poking a TC is that the TQ always has to move towards the flex plate. So if I'm unsure of the depth, I measure and make sure that the TC will have room to move towards the Flex plate. If you bolt up the trans/engine so the TC doesn't move back and forth and is pressed hard against the flex plate, it's not poked all the way.

I was a bit sceered of this one, but it turned out to be the fastest I have ever done. I literally spent more time skimming this thread than poking the TC.




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