Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Brake Bleeding A DIY Kit


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 msmithmmx

msmithmmx

    Subaru Nut

  • Members
  • 668 posts
  • West Grove, PA

Posted 19 December 2007 - 07:41 AM

I am getting ready to sell my 97 OBW limited that I just installed a 2.2 in and I noticed the brake fluid is brown. I searched the web for instructions if it were to be a one man job and came across this DIY type tool. Has anyone used this before, if so how did it work? http://www.motivepro...02bleeders.html

#2 Rooster2

Rooster2

    Subaru Master

  • Members
  • 3,551 posts
  • Indianapolis

Posted 19 December 2007 - 10:08 AM

I posted a couple of weeks ago about using a "one man bleeder system" in response to someone having trouble with air in the brake lines. The little system works very well, and is great for the "do it your selfer." I wrote a lengthy step by step report on how to use the one man bleeder. Should be easy to find in the archives.


My bottle kit is pretty much like the first one shown on the website, except that mine has a magnet affixed to the back side of the bottle, instead of the stainless steel wire holder hook. No big deal. My unit does not have a pump, and I don't see an advantage having one.

#3 Skip

Skip

    Flatuous Blather

  • Moderator
  • 8,991 posts
  • Latrobe, Pennsylvania

Posted 19 December 2007 - 10:20 AM

I was wondering which system he meant also?

The pressure type - tank with gauge - pressurizes the master cyl.

Open an bleeder -> out comes the fluid.

I like the vacuum type (Mity Vac or my home made system)
Sucks the fluid through the system.

If you use the brake pedal to bleed them, listen to the Roosters method.
Do not push the brake pedal to the floor.

The bottom part of the MC may have crud that gets dragged up onto the seals.
My EZ bleed -vacuum pump and vacuum flask.
Posted Image

#4 RallyKeith

RallyKeith

    Got Subaru(s)?

  • Members
  • 1,481 posts
  • Reading, Pa

Posted 19 December 2007 - 11:36 AM

I like the vacuum type (Mity Vac or my home made system)
Sucks the fluid through the system.


I've used the Mity Vac on several cars with pretty much no issues. If the goober that fits onto the bleeder nipple doesn't seal well it will suck air in and make you think you're getting lots of air out of the brake lines when you aren't, so be aware of that.

Keith

#5 Skip

Skip

    Flatuous Blather

  • Moderator
  • 8,991 posts
  • Latrobe, Pennsylvania

Posted 19 December 2007 - 11:45 AM

+1 for Keiths sugg.

plus,
I remove the bleeder nipple and coat the threads with
anti sieze to prevent air from being drawn in.

#6 jamal

jamal

    1000+ Super USER!

  • Members
  • 1,015 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:39 PM

I prefer vacuum over pressure bleeding. Theoretically it reduces the chance of air in the system.

#7 Strakes

Strakes

    Kaboom? Kaboom?

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • Knoxville

Posted 19 December 2007 - 02:10 PM

I am getting ready to sell my 97 OBW limited that I just installed a 2.2 in and I noticed the brake fluid is brown. I searched the web for instructions if it were to be a one man job and came across this DIY type tool. Has anyone used this before, if so how did it work? http://www.motivepro...02bleeders.html



I have one of their "power bleeders". I am pretty sure it's the universal one that's listed near the bottom of their list. I emailed them and they responded with the correct item for my Subarus. I really like it a lot. You'll only get air in the system if you use it improperly...like letting the brake fluid get low in the pressurized bottle, using too much pressure, or not making sure you get a good seal on top. Works well in both of our cars and a couple of friends have borrowed it and like it a lot as well.

#8 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 4,920 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 19 December 2007 - 02:47 PM

Sometimes the vacuum bleed kits include a small tube of silicone grease to help with the sucking air in around the bleeder issue. For not too much $ I made a homemade setup kind of like Skip's out of an old 10 gallon portable air tank and one of those compressed air powered vacuum pullers from harbor freight.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users