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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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Stuck caliper pin / slide


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31 replies to this topic

#26 1-3-2-4

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 08:54 AM

thanks for the tip on the torch.. I don't use this that much I've had this tank for at least 3-4 years and still have a decent amount left.. the rubber boot never caught on fire yesterday but the PB blaster did flame up but nothing that blowing it out could not handle.

I noticed when i got on the highway yesterday anything over like 70 MPH I got some crazy wheel vibration coming from the rear of the car but It has not come back again yet.. maybe it was because of the brake pad and how it was wearing on the rotor with a stuck caliper?

These ceramics stop much better then my last pads.. I'm sure they were semi-metallic pads.

#27 johnceggleston

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 09:08 AM

Using anti seize then is a good thing to do to help keep them from corroding again. This stuff tends to be more resilient to the elements than many other types of lubricants.


ok, i like this idea, i like anti-seize, but is it a good / better lube for brake slide pins?? i hope so, i'm tired of buying individual packs of hi-temp brake lube, what a rip off.

fyi: on a side note for subie brake rookies, on some brake calipers, outbacks and GT fronts from the late 90s, the slide pins are actually tubes. i lubed the hell out of the inside of the tube and saw no improvement. it turns out that the caliper slides on the outside of the tube, the blot is on the inside and the tube doesn't really slide on that. so lube the outside of the tube not just the inside. on the lego rears one slide pin is actually the bolt and the other is a pin, no tubes.

i guess this would be a surprise only for people like me who learned on rear lego brakes first and then tackled outback fronts.

if there are errors in this let me know, i'll edit or delete.

#28 1-3-2-4

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 09:22 AM

I know what you mean about those packs of grease.. that's why I picked up the screw on bottle type because I knew I would not have enough (learned with my impreza)

it's nice not to get brake judder anymore.

#29 Rooster2

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 05:00 PM

ok, i like this idea, i like anti-seize, but is it a good / better lube for brake slide pins?? i hope so, i'm tired of buying individual packs of hi-temp brake lube, what a rip off.

fyi: on a side note for subie brake rookies, on some brake calipers, outbacks and GT fronts from the late 90s, the slide pins are actually tubes. i lubed the hell out of the inside of the tube and saw no improvement. it turns out that the caliper slides on the outside of the tube, the blot is on the inside and the tube doesn't really slide on that. so lube the outside of the tube not just the inside. on the lego rears one slide pin is actually the bolt and the other is a pin, no tubes.

i guess this would be a surprise only for people like me who learned on rear lego brakes first and then tackled outback fronts.

if there are errors in this let me know, i'll edit or delete.




I have used the anti-seize on the slide pins and all threaded bolts for a few years now. It seems to work, and holds up real well. It also works as a lube to help bolts and nuts thread on easier. Works great even on the lug nuts. They tighten up real smooth and nice.

#30 grossgary

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 05:24 PM

i hope so, i'm tired of buying individual packs of hi-temp brake lube, what a rip off.

buy the large jars of it, every store sells them they're just not sitting right on the counter like the packs. you'll be surprised how quickly you go through it. doesn't seem like enough to me, i'm not surprised with those small packs that things corrode again later.

#31 1-3-2-4

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 05:29 PM

buy the large jars of it, every store sells them they're just not sitting right on the counter like the packs. you'll be surprised how quickly you go through it. doesn't seem like enough to me, i'm not surprised with those small packs that things corrode again later.




Agree I think the permatex was like $10

#32 Allpar Mod

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 08:15 AM

Anti seize is not the best lubricant there is if you're simply talking lubrication quality or amount of slipperiness, but the main thing is that it allows the metal to not corrode and to do what it is intended to do how it is supposed to do it. When you get some of this silver stuff on your hands, notice how hard it is to wipe off compared to grease or oils. It is chemically designed to leave a resilient coating on the surface and for high corrosion prone areas, this is exactly what you want something to do. You'll be quite pleased with the long term outcome using this product rather than conventional lubricants for this particular application.




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