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Jalopnik review of he new diesel ...


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16 replies to this topic

#1 mtsmiths

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 11:45 AM

http://jalopnik.com/...iesel-in-detail

#2 Legacy777

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 12:08 PM

Pretty cool stuff. 26,000 PSI fuel pressure....that's insane!

#3 Olnick

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 12:24 PM

Wow! Can't wait to see--and hear--these . . . and get some real-life reviews and feedback here in North America.

#4 frag

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 08:05 PM

sorry

#5 rverdoold

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 01:52 AM

Next time i will drive i will take some pictures and movies. Its a cool car.

#6 Olnick

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 02:25 AM

Thanks, rverdoold, that would be great.

#7 Legacy777

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 11:44 AM

Here's the more technical review

http://techon.nikkei...0080222/147866/

#8 nipper

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 06:23 PM

Pretty cool stuff. 26,000 PSI fuel pressure....that's insane!


Thats typical diesel injector pressure.


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#9 nipper

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 06:27 PM

Soooooooooooo 2 inches shorter then a 2.0


hrmmmmm

#10 rverdoold

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 03:15 PM

Soooooooooooo 2 inches shorter then a 2.0


hrmmmmm


I always have to think how much 2 inch is it doesnt sound much. But its a real 5 cm which sounds really 2.5 times bigger/more :grin:

Dad is picking up the 05 OBW which i kissed the tree with. So guess will not be driving the Diesel soon again. Or maybe i can try and get new sparkplug cables from the dealer and show my interest.:)

#11 aircraft engineer

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 04:53 PM

next thing you'll say is that 5 cm is twice as big as 2 inches :lol:

2.54cm = 1 inch
or 1mm = .03937 inch - which is also about 2 hacksaw blades thickness

I wish the WHOLE WORLD WOULD BE METRIC (or at least COMMON - remember, the US flew a Mars probe into the surface because Lockheed was calculating in "US Customary" and JPL - that's Jet Propulsion Labs - was using "metric". Computer just used a "number" - didn't matter to IT - C R U N C H!!)

#12 nipper

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 05:03 PM

next thing you'll say is that 5 cm is twice as big as 2 inches :lol:

2.54cm = 1 inch
or 1mm = .03937 inch - which is also about 2 hacksaw blades thickness

I wish the WHOLE WORLD WOULD BE METRIC (or at least COMMON - remember, the US flew a Mars probe into the surface because Lockheed was calculating in "US Customary" and JPL - that's Jet Propulsion Labs - was using "metric". Computer just used a "number" - didn't matter to IT - C R U N C H!!)


Well who knew that Mars wasn't metric?

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#13 aircraft engineer

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 08:37 PM

More about the SI system (that's "metric") than you ever wanted to know (or likely even CARE)

the distance from the equator along the meridian passing thru Paris divided by 10 million was the "original" meter (they were pretty close, actually for the late 18th century)

It was inscribed as the distance between 2 lines on a platinum-iridium bar and then later converted to some number of cycles of a particular frequency of light as a length.

Temperature was established as defining the "triple point" (liquid, solid and gas exist at the same time) of pure water as "zero" and the boiling point of water as "100".

mass was defined by having a cube of water at some specific temperature (too lazy to go look it up right now) .01 of those meters on a side and that makes a "gram" (physical constants with an "earth centric" basis)

everything is by TENS (none of this English measurement system where things were defined and re-defined by the monarch's "measurements" - "inch" was the thumb joint, "foot" - well, DUH!, "cubit" - elbow to ends of the fingertips, and 12p to a shilling and then 20 shillings to a pound (no, not THAT pound - money) Hogsheads per fortnight and all that. :grin: And ever wonder why engines are rated in horsepower? Why train tracks are 4'6-1/2" apart? :popcorn: This is left as an exercise for the reader - but I'll tell you that the train track spacing has to do with the southbound end of a northbound HORSE

OK - class dismissed. :clap:

#14 nipper

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 08:40 PM

Why train tracks are 4'6-1/2" apart? :popcorn: This is left as an exercise for the reader - but I'll tell you that the train track spacing has to do with the southbound end of a northbound HORSE

OK - class dismissed. :clap:


Roman Chariots.

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#15 Olnick

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 11:56 PM

Why train tracks are 4'6-1/2" apart? :popcorn: This is left as an exercise for the reader - but I'll tell you that the train track spacing has to do with the southbound end of a northbound HORSE

:clap:


Not to be niggling here but they are actually 4' 8-1/2" apart. Has something to do with two northbound horses!

#16 nipper

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 11:58 PM

Not to be niggling here but they are actually 4' 8-1/2" apart. Has something to do with two northbound horses!


Why do i sense a math word problem coming on.....


http://www.straightd...mns/000218.html


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#17 aircraft engineer

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 12:37 PM

OK - so I have a different one.

During WWII they needed to have leather for aircraft seats. So they started up a production facility. The MIL-Spec for the leather said that it needed a treatment to wash it down with a dilute solution of "llama dung" (yeah - POO) so the gummint started a llama farm in NJ to raise the llamas.

It was difficult getting the poo from Chile and Peru by boat (just imagine the cargo manifest - "63 tonnes of "llama dung" - man I've heard of "hauling shìt", but it would have been the truth). Anyway - they couldn't get enough "off the farm" so they decided to "waive" the requirement.

So, the issue ended and would have been consigned to utter obscurity - BUT - after the war, some engineer decided to try to figure out the "reason" for the poo wash. (Not that it mattered, just curiosity)

And he found out... the aircraft seat leather Mil-spec was essentially a copy of the Mil-spec for "saddle leather" from the US cavalry. No help there - it had the identical requirement. So where did the spec come from?

WELL - it was in turn derived from the BRITISH spec for "saddle leather" as well. Bless their little Limey hearts, the BRITS kept METICULOUS records and this is what was found:

The Brit spec dates from the early 19th century. The tanning process was what was called "chromate tanning".

That chromate process produced a small that to HORSES was about like the smell of bottled propane (yeah - it stunk). WE recognize the smell as the smell of "new leather shoes" right out of the box.

That smell made the horses skittish, so the Brits went about trying to find a way to make it acceptable to the horses. "Wash with a dilute solution of llama dung" was found to work (not having llamas, I can't say if it stinks or not) BUT it worked and that's how a crappy requirement got into aircraft seat bottoms. Old specs never die - they just get reincarnated as a "new" spec.

Pilots didn't care about that"new car smell". Just remember not to saddle your horse with a WWII aircraft seat. :grin:




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