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Off road gear


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63 replies to this topic

#1 SoobieDoo

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 07:58 AM

So what tools and gear are you guys carrying, specifically for off road use? I'm piecing together my own, but don't want to carry 100lbs worth of tools around. For example: full sized shovel, or folding one? I also intend to carry a spare axle, so tools needed for that, too. Pics would be great! :banana:

#2 nipper

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 04:33 PM

Well it depends upon how deep off road you are planing on going. Soobies are tough, if you break a CV joint, its usually means you have broken some other serious parts too.

Tow strap, shovel (sharp spade type), gloves, portable air compressor for airing down (and back up). A change of shoes is always a good idea. I also keep a rain poncho in the car.

ALso you need to bring a friend along or two in another car for deep stuff. I go wheelin alone but am very careful as to where I go and avoid anything iffy.


nipper

#3 SoobieDoo

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 05:26 PM

Well it depends upon how deep off road you are planing on going. Soobies are tough, if you break a CV joint, its usually means you have broken some other serious parts too.

Tow strap, shovel (sharp spade type), gloves, portable air compressor for airing down (and back up). A change of shoes is always a good idea. I also keep a rain poncho in the car.

ALso you need to bring a friend along or two in another car for deep stuff. I go wheelin alone but am very careful as to where I go and avoid anything iffy.


nipper


All good stuff to have, thanks. Won't be wheeling alone...don't see the fun in that. I know that I'll need a 36mm, breaker bar, pin punch and sledge for the axle change. What size punch is needed? I'm also including a tarp, basic tools, come along, flashlight...anything else I'm missing? I hope some more of the off road guys find this new area. :banana:

#4 Twitch de la Brat

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 05:37 PM

Well it depends upon how deep off road you are planing on going. Soobies are tough, if you break a CV joint, its usually means you have broken some other serious parts too.

Tow strap, shovel (sharp spade type), gloves, portable air compressor for airing down (and back up). A change of shoes is always a good idea. I also keep a rain poncho in the car.

ALso you need to bring a friend along or two in another car for deep stuff. I go wheelin alone but am very careful as to where I go and avoid anything iffy.


nipper


I concurr with everything nipper has said.
I would add, that I always bring two jacks of some sort with me.
Usually my scissor jack and a tall bottle jack (for extra distance).
A blanket, some 3ft or longer 2x4's for wedging or gapping over a hole or
for extra lift under the jack, a flashlight, 6pack of your favorite drink (ok, its
optional, but hey, you're out wheelin' right?) some random garbage for
extra traction if necessary, a quart of oil (who doesn't already have oil in
their old subaru? :-p) and a phone that gets reception everywhere. (or a
two way radio) for emergencies.

I think I covered all that I bring with me...

Twitch

#5 nipper

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 06:01 PM

Even with a come-a-long you should have a std nylon strap.

I used to do extreemly long pull tests on tow cables for mine sweepers. Life would get really exciting if one of them let go. We learned that you take the nylon strap and put one end on the thing being pulled, and loosely wind it around cable over and over working your way up the cable. This does nothing for pull force, BUT if the hook lets go, it will entrap the cable and keep it from snapping back. If the cable lets loose after the hook it tends to loose energy quickly (the farther away you are the less damage it will do). Nylon straps when they fail (when yanking out a car)tend to unravel or have the stitching let loose.

Have we mentioned a flashlight?

A GPS enabled phone or GPS comes in handy in a worse case scenario. Being able to find yourself with lat/long is a good thing.

A long straight stick also. There is no shame in checking the depth of that puddle your buddy just went through, as he may have lucked out.

nipper

#6 SoobieDoo

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 06:17 PM

Thanks, twitch...I forgot about the wood. Want some plywood for jacking in mud, too. My cell phone may not get reception, but the CB has pretty good range with the antenna mounted like it is.

Nipper...got the flashlight. My Christmas present was a Maglite 2-cell, 3w LED. That thing rocks! Nearly as bright as the krypton, but much better battery life. :headbang:
I got a nylon tow strap already, but how 'bout a recovery strap?

#7 The Scooby

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 10:16 PM

come-a-long
2 20ft. 20Klbs tow straps
shovel
spare front/rear axel
extra engine oil and coolant
snap-on 1/2 inch electric impact with 12,14,17,19,36mm sockets and wrenches
flat blade and philips screw drivers
wire, crimpers, and connectors
assorted hammers
flares
water
energy bars
flashlights and extra battery's.
full size spare

tire weighs 50lbs and everything else is about 40lbs total.

#8 SoobieDoo

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 10:45 PM

come-a-long
2 20ft. 20Klbs tow straps
shovel
spare front/rear axel
extra engine oil and coolant
snap-on 1/2 inch electric impact with 12,14,17,19,36mm sockets and wrenches
flat blade and philips screw drivers
wire, crimpers, and connectors
assorted hammers
flares
water
energy bars
flashlights and extra battery's.
full size spare

tire weighs 50lbs and everything else is about 40lbs total.


Nice kit, man. Use a pin punch for the axles, and what size? I Think I need another tow strap.

#9 nipper

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 11:12 PM

and dont ever forget that full tank of gas :)

One can never underestimate the obvious.

nipper

#10 mountaingoatgruff

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 02:39 AM

i'm suprized nobody mentioned even a basic first aid kit. one good gash or fall or whatever can end you if you and those around are not prepared.

#11 SoobieDoo

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 07:18 AM

i'm suprized nobody mentioned even a basic first aid kit. one good gash or fall or whatever can end you if you and those around are not prepared.


...and this is the reason for this thread.
Thanks, goat! :grin:

#12 Twitch de la Brat

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 12:32 PM

Don't forget a heavy jacket.
And that looked like a really good list to bring scooby.
Oh, and hand cleaner, a roll of shop towels, and electrical and duct tape
is my first aid kit.
I don't need no antibacterial band aid crap in my kit.

Twitch

#13 SoobieDoo

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 06:35 PM

duct tape
is my first aid kit.

Twitch


Wow, duct tape will really do anything! :lol:
That's okay, I've used super glue to stop bleeding.
What's the general consensus on a soob come along rating? I've seen some that are rated, but don't say whether that's lift or pull. I'm looking at a 2-ton brand made by masdaam.

#14 Gloyale

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 09:19 PM

Oh, and hand cleaner, a roll of shop towels, and electrical and duct tape
is my first aid kit.
I don't need no antibacterial band aid crap in my kit.

Twitch


Spoken like a true 18 yo

#15 subiemech85

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 10:15 PM

depending on how deep the snow is..... 20" two stage snow blower ariens 2+2, makita 4cycle blower, full size snow shovel, 5 gallons gas in safety can, heat gun, extension cords, milkhouse heater, 1.5kw generator, extension handle snow brush / ice scraper, air compressor, well stocked tool kit

#16 Scott in Bellingham

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 10:17 PM

What's the general consensus on a soob come along rating? I've seen some that are rated, but don't say whether that's lift or pull. I'm looking at a 2-ton brand made by masdaam.


get a solid spool type , the multiplate stamped steel ones ive had issues with

#17 SoobieDoo

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 11:23 PM

depending on how deep the snow is..... 20" two stage snow blower ariens 2+2, makita 4cycle blower, full size snow shovel, 5 gallons gas in safety can, heat gun, extension cords, milkhouse heater, 1.5kw generator, extension handle snow brush / ice scraper, air compressor, well stocked tool kit


Ok...so what do I need for a river crossing? :lol:

Thanks, Scott! I'll see what my work has in stock.

#18 subiemech85

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 12:43 AM

Ok...so what do I need for a river crossing? :lol:


take your pick:

bridge

snowmobile

ice

ss subaru http://www.ultimates...cean electrical

why settle for crossing the river when you can drive on the lake?? :D

#19 mountaingoatgruff

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 06:02 PM

I've used super glue to stop bleeding.


superglue is great for bonding to skin. superglue comes in methyl-2-cyanoacrylate and ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate. CA is used in the healthcare industry everyday, medical grade is 2-octyl cyanoacrylate. i dropped the tail end of a 4EAT on my right ring finger a few months ago and the flesh was torn too badly for stitches so they glued it together. nasty scar but the stuff works!

to use superglue on porous surfaces, smear baking soda on the joint first.

#20 mountaingoatgruff

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 06:14 PM

...duct tape is my first aid kit. I don't need no antibacterial band aid crap in my kit...


i used to try to act macho about first aid and medical needs, but the simple fact is that this country and it's healthcare system are both on the brink of collapse for various political reasons and regardless of where you stand on that issue - you'll either know how to properly treat yourself and others or you'll die of infection or something just as easily prevented...or worse you'll watch loved ones die because of your ignorance.

i've invested literally hundreds of $'s into medical supplies for my own use and my wife is training as an EMT so we can treat ourselves instead of throwing ourselves at the mercy of the criminal cartel this country calls health insurance. we're not there yet, but we're learning and trying. if you gashed you palm on a jagged piece of metal, would be able to stitch it yourself? do you have family or close friends capable of doing it? do you even know how to properly stop the bleeding? hospitals and clinics rely on the economy's health to remain in operation - that's obviously going down the tubes faster than anyone can even keep track of and its only gaining momentum. time to wise up or sign up for early enrollment in a fema camp, folks.

recognizing a threat and being prepared is not a sign of fear, if anything its a sign of intelligence.

neglecting or denying a threat is the essence of fear.

Edited by mountaingoatgruff, 31 March 2009 - 06:24 PM.


#21 SoobieDoo

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 09:02 PM

Ok, I'd consider the super glue as relevant to this thread, since it could be used both as first aid and on the soob. I'm not personally gonna spend the bucks that med grade glue would cost, but my personal choice is 2P10: triple distilled CA glue right here in bellingham.

I have something like this, that I never keep charged up for emergencies, but with a tire off the ground, I think it could manage to inflate all the tires. It's a cheap POS, but a buddy of mine just loves his:
http://cgi.ebay.com/...:1|293:1|294:50

#22 Phizinza

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 11:03 PM

I take my tool box which has:
1/2" drive 6mm to 24mm sockets as well was 36mm socket for the axle nuts,
1/2" drive ratchet, 12" extension + 6" extension + 2" extension and uni joint,
1/2" T-bar,
Philip and flat head screw drivers (short ones and long ones),
Assorted Alan keys,
Hacksaw,
Hammer,
6mm to 19mm ring spanners,
Pliers, end cutters, needle nose pliers,
6mm long punch (for axle pins),
Feeler gauges, and blades/knives.

I take a 4WD bottle jack (not hydraulic).
9m snatch strap.
3 to 10 litres of water depending on whats in the car.
First aid kit.
Spare ball joint, belts, hoses, fluids (oils).


Then on big trips we take these extras:
2 to 3 more snatch straps,
20L water (this is for cars, not drinking we have extra for that),
Arc welding gear (we use two of the cars batteries for power),
Shovel,
Silicone,
Multimeter,
Jump starter,
Air compressor (although only if I'm not going with my brother as he has onboard air).

And my brother also has all the winch gear for his 4runner:
winch block, tree protector, shackles, etc.


We don't normally use much of any of it. But we have had to weld in the past, also have had radiator issues. Always need oils. Snatch straps are a must. And with my brother he needs the winch as when a 4runner like his gets stuck, its stuck...

#23 SoobieDoo

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 11:21 PM

I take my tool box which has:
1/2" drive 6mm to 24mm sockets as well was 36mm socket for the axle nuts,
1/2" drive ratchet, 12" extension + 6" extension + 2" extension and uni joint,
1/2" T-bar,
Philip and flat head screw drivers (short ones and long ones),
Assorted Alan keys,
Hacksaw,
Hammer,
6mm to 19mm ring spanners,
Pliers, end cutters, needle nose pliers,
6mm long punch (for axle pins),
Feeler gauges, and blades/knives.

I take a 4WD bottle jack (not hydraulic).
9m snatch strap.
3 to 10 litres of water depending on whats in the car.
First aid kit.
Spare ball joint, belts, hoses, fluids (oils).


Then on big trips we take these extras:
2 to 3 more snatch straps,
20L water (this is for cars, not drinking we have extra for that),
Arc welding gear (we use two of the cars batteries for power),
Shovel,
Silicone,
Multimeter,
Jump starter,
Air compressor (although only if I'm not going with my brother as he has onboard air).

And my brother also has all the winch gear for his 4runner:
winch block, tree protector, shackles, etc.


We don't normally use much of any of it. But we have had to weld in the past, also have had radiator issues. Always need oils. Snatch straps are a must. And with my brother he needs the winch as when a 4runner like his gets stuck, its stuck...


Now that's being prepared! Doubt I'll assemble even half of that for my first outing next month, but having all these lists to go through is great. Heck, we even forgot a basic first aid kit for several posts. Here's another addition that I haven't seen mentioned yet: Tommy tape. Duct tape may work okay on burst hoses, but It'll still leak slowly. Tommy is self-fusing silicone tape, and will semi-permanently fix a leaking hose, brake line, etc. Duct tape may be a better band-aid, though! :lol:

#24 mountaingoatgruff

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 11:52 PM

...I'm not personally gonna spend the bucks that med grade glue would cost...


i've used both on my own skin and i've only noticed a few minor differences:

med grade burns less because it oxidizes more slowly, which also means more time to work with it. med grade also is usually dyed and scented.

definitely not worth additional cost. i buy off brand CA at the dollar store, works just as well.

if you're going to keep CA at the ready, make sure it's sealed. once opened that stuff dries out over time.

i also carry a freash tube of black rtv in my traveling tool box.

#25 subieman666

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 06:16 PM

i would carry basic tools and what not, jacks extra gas, super glue, duct tape and cb radio, sleeping bag and a propane torch for making a fire incase you gotta camp out for a night, and some extra food and liquid ( usually something that doesn't dyhydrate you fast) that's just on top of what i usually keep in my subie.




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