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Markus56

4" lift kit build thread

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Yohn,

 

Get some 2 x 2 square tubing and link them together. They will be plenty strong if they are linked. You will have to grind some of that silly paint off, but, oh well. :rolleyes::grin:

 

Any light welder will link do it just fine. A little measuring, and that sawzall will have all the pieces done in no time. Linking those blocks together increases their capabilities big time.

 

ditto.....

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Exactly - my point is simply that they need to be reinforced somehow. There's a couple ways to accomplish it, but 1/8" wall 2x4x2 blocks will not cut it on their own.

 

i have met him, and i think he is ridiculous.

 

 

ditto.....

 

So I'm rediculous.... but we are saying the same thing. How does that work? :)

 

At any rate - to recap the consensus here: Reinforce or replace. Wheeling it the way you have it now, while it may work for a short time, is probably ill-advised. You stand a good chance of breaking something - not that this isn't inevitable with wheeling a Subaru, but at least try to forsee it and build to avoid it. That way maybe you actually get to spend some time having fun rather than just fixing or towing your machine.

 

Try to avoid what I did - first time out with my wagon I went maybe 20 feet into a mud hole and it never moved again till it was towed back to Qman's place and the engine pulled out for a clutch job. :-\

 

GD

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Yohn,

 

Get some 2 x 2 square tubing and link them together. They will be plenty strong if they are linked. You will have to grind some of that silly paint off, but, oh well. :rolleyes::grin:

 

Any light welder will link do it just fine. A little measuring, and that sawzall will have all the pieces done in no time. Linking those blocks together increases their capabilities big time.

 

should i use 1/8th" 2x2? i have a lot of it

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how you go about things is ridiculous rick.....thats all.your making undue accusations of failure, setting the poor kids life afire with paranoia, and worst of all...............not allowing him to make his own mistakes,and depend on the people he has around him to help him along.back off, let the boy become a man.

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....and if you don't like reading it , piss off.defend someone you actually know, and or have met.i have met him, and i think he is ridiculous.

there are people that stand around and talk about how something should be done properly, and polenty of ************ out there that is good enough to work.

 

also, a jack of all is a master of none.and some should just keep there mouth shut.me included sometimes.go get your post count somewhere else.

 

What the hell man.

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I understand that you don't agree with some of my methods but to argue that he should learn for himself and make his own mistakes ignores the primary function of this forum - which is to help people NOT to make mistakes. He can choose to not post here and "learn for himself". IMO, posting here on the USMB is a consent to hear opinions on a subject - yours and mine.

 

GD

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I just wanted to say, thank you all for your help and support, and for the entertainment of seeing you guys butt heads. hopefully this project will be done soon so you can argue elsewhere :-p

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Yohn,

 

1/8" walled 2" x 2" square tubing linking those blocks together would go a LONG ways to strengthening the situation you have there. Especially if you leave the motor mount blocks facing parrallel with the tires as you have them now. My 1/8" blocks face perpendicular to the tires, and are tied together with pipe. The pipe isn't of any matter, but the blocks turned sideways (like on my car) would actually be weaker considering most shear force is going to be coming from the front or rear of the block, and not the side.

 

Leave the blocks facing forwards like you have them now, turn a few of the trans crossmember blocks so they can be linked as well. Do some measurements, and cut some link material out of whatever you have handy. 1/8" walled 2" x 2" tubing will be great. It will match up nicely. I can't say that it will never crush, but, I beat my car until it doesn't move anymore, and none of my blocks did. Is it as ideal as 1/4" walled material? No, probably not. But, there is a big difference between discussing theories and actually wheeling. I say we skip the BS, and actually get you back to wheeling. Just keep an eye on them after each trip. If they do crush, we have the technology to replace them..... :grin::)

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like he said, link material thickness is not as important as anything else, as long as it is there........although easier to weld if close to the same thickness...

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got it running today. should be finished tomorrow, weather dependent

 

And i installed the RX driver's seat. MOST COMFORTABLE SEAT EVER :headbang:

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Yeah - if you have have the 2x2 tubing to use as braceing between the blocks go for it. At least with the thin material it will make welding easier as there is pretty much no prep required other than to remove the paint.

 

I don't know which is worse - the sheering forces, or the compression forces with respect to the engine cross-member blocks. The one's I witnessed didn't seem to have a problem with sheer so much as just compression from the weight comming down on them when the front end would bounce.

 

You could also put "wings" on the blocks - just some strips of flat-bar that turn the vertical cross-section into a "T" shape. That would help keep them from bowing outward.

 

GD

Edited by GeneralDisorder

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no. its still not done. my dad's auto shade welding helmet quit working so now he's flash-burned his eyes. the welds on the shift linkages turned out really bad, and i cant shift it into 2wd because the link is welded too long :mad:

 

oh well. :-\

 

 

on the plus side my headlights work again :rolleyes:

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Montana Road Trip? Not my first choice for a shake down on a freshly lifted vehicle. Especially a Subaru. But hey, have fun and good luck with that! :)

 

Be sure to check the bolts every stop so you don't accidently wipe out an innocent sagebrush family.... :eek:

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Well the car grenaded today. the driver side control arm fell off and the tire locked up and broke an axle. and i didnt have any rear axles installed. so i got towed home. 70 bucks later it turns out i now have to replace all the axles on the dumb thing :mad::horse:

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That sux man! At least no one was hurt, with such a catastrophic failure. Were your rear axles bad to begin with?

 

~Eric

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that side didn't have the stock bolt. It had a machine bolt and nut with washers because i had to torch the original bolt off, because i didn't have any air tools when i did axles for the first time. i had one of my friends helping me (who is a nerd turned auto mechanic :lol:) and he was doing that side when we putting the car back together. i think he forget the lock washers. Oh well. It needed new axles anyway

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Well i know how im not installing my lift. Droppin the engine it is.:-\

 

What do you mean by that?

 

Yeah, I didn't catch that either. :lol:

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