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Long ago, I retrofitted LED illumination on the Glove Box of the "KiaStein" ...


My '69 Mercury Coupé and my '85 Subaru Wagon have lights on their glove boxes from factory, but my Wife's Kia Sephia sedan, didn't, so I did the Retrofit, let me share here an old post with information regarding to the retrofitting subject:



I also added a Useful LED lights panel to my Wife's "KiaSten" Glovebox:


LuzenGaveta.jpg


I took the Power wirings from the A/C Panel's Background illumination, and placed a 6 Led Lights' flat Panel up on the Glovebox, held in place by a small zip tie... That setup has been working flawlessly since years ago.

You can do similar setup on your car, it is couple of hours job...

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That setup continues working flawlessly, But the way the Glovebox closes, lets too much space for free play; and besides of occasional rattle noises while driving on unpaved roads, sometimes a little glare from the LED illumination, escapes from the Opening, and the Glovebox didn't have a way to adjust how far or how near it closes from the dashboard's body.

So, I removed the Metal hook for the Glovebox latch, and noticed that the only way to let the Glovebox to be closer to the Dashboard, was to weld shut the two tiny holes for the screws on said metal hook, and then re-open them in a little different position, in order to let the glove box, to seal closer to the Dashboard.


Let me show ya:

gancho%20gaveta.jpg

Another problem, Solved :)  


Now the glovebox Closes as it should, an no more rattling noises, nor glare escapes from the glove box at all.

Kind Regards.

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On 5/30/2019 at 5:03 AM, Loyale 2.7 Turbo said:

Finally, I Had to purchase three cans of r134a gas and one can of the appropriated lubricant oil for the air conditioner system on the "KiaStein" and...

 

04%20gas%20and%20oil.jpg


...Voilá!  :)  another problem, Solved.

 

 

Jes,

Does the manual state to use ester oil vs. PAG oil?  I've found ester oil doesn't work as well as PAG oil with r134a.  I believe I've had compressor failures in the past due to insufficient lubrication.

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On 6/8/2019 at 7:05 AM, Legacy777 said:

 

Jes,

Does the manual state to use ester oil vs. PAG oil?  I've found ester oil doesn't work as well as PAG oil with r134a.  I believe I've had compressor failures in the past due to insufficient lubrication.


Regarding the Lubricant used on the A/C Compressor, the answer to your Question is No.

The A/C Compressor found on this "KiaStein" states that it should be filled with a Mixture of r134a refrigerant Gas and Daphne lubricating oil, as you can see in the following photo from said compressor's sticker:


Compressor%20Specs.jpg


This is an example of a Daphne oil can:

Daphne%20Oil%201.jpg


And these are the Daphne Oil Specs, found online:

Daphne%20Specs.jpg


The problem was the availability, I couldn't find it in this small town where I live, so I had to travel to another, bigger city (but still small), to search among their stores, and the only A/C compressor's Lubricant that I found on all of them, was the Ester oil:


Ester%20Oil%201.jpg

 

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I must confess that I am not an expert on A/C systems, so due to the lack of the Daphne oil, prior to purchase the Ester oil, I asked to the salesman at the store, regarding the differences between the Daphne and the Ester oils; and basically talking, I understood that there are two types of Ester lubricating oils, the old type which is simple; and the new type, which is composite with an special additive, known as: "Ice 32" which is alleged to work better in old, higher mileage compressors than the Daphne oil...


Here are the Specs from the Ester Lubricating oil, also found online:

Ester%20Specs.jpg


Here is some information regarding the "Ice 32" Additive:

Ice%2032%20Specs.jpg

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Ok, well you've got to use what you have available.  I'm sure it will work ok. 

The main issue I had with plain ester oil was it didn't lubricate as well and I believe lead to compressor failures.  If the ICE 32 is supposed to help lubrication hopefully that well alleviate some of the issues I may have had.

There appears to be different kinds of the Daphne Hermetic Oil, did the compressor say what viscosity/type?

https://www.ilacorp.com/products/industrial-lubricants/refrigeration-compressor-oils.html

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On 6/10/2019 at 10:21 AM, Legacy777 said:

Ok, well you've got to use what you have available.  I'm sure it will work ok. 

The main issue I had with plain ester oil was it didn't lubricate as well and I believe lead to compressor failures.  If the ICE 32 is supposed to help lubrication hopefully that well alleviate some of the issues I may have had.

There appears to be different kinds of the Daphne Hermetic Oil, did the compressor say what viscosity/type?

https://www.ilacorp.com/products/industrial-lubricants/refrigeration-compressor-oils.html

Firstly: Sorry for the delay in answering...

Yes... the Compressor states that it must use Daphne Hermetic Oil number FD46GX and according to the internet searching I did, it is considered as a "High Viscosity" Lubricant, while having a Nº 46 viscosity.

Then I also searched about the Ester oil viscosity number, and I found that it is considered a "Medium Viscosity" Lubricant, while having a Nº 100 viscosity. :o

This is pretty confusing, especially for a newbie on A/C systems like me; and sounded like I just screwed up my compressor by going twice as thick on lubricant, until I read even more information, and I found this website:

~► Compressor oils [SubsTech]

on which I found information regarding the subject, written in easy understanding words; and I found two things, one is that Ester oil is semi-synthetic, while Daphne is Mineral; the other thing I found, is that there is an ISO viscosity index that measures low temperature and high temperature flowing behaviour of the lubricant; which you can see in the following comparison tables:

Daphne 46


DAPHNE%20Viscosity%20Chart.jpg


Ester 100
ESTER%20viscosity%20chart.jpg


And if you read them, the Viscosity index of the Daphne oil, ends being ~ 108, while the viscosity index of the Ester oil, ends being ~ 110 so, the difference is minimum, as far as I understand.

I hope I didn't screw things by using Ester oil instead of Daphne oil... 

Kind Regards.

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Dear Friend,

Please do not hesitate to let me know if I made a mistake and if I should hurry to change the gas + oil on the A/C system, to avoid future costly repairs; I am not an expert on A/C systems... In fact, I'm not expert on mechanics (you can read further, ~► here); I am self taught even on english language, so please let me Know if I'm wrong.

Now, answering your question: The A/C system has been working since I repaired it, in the last week of the month of may, and my wife, who really can't live without the air conditioning, says it is performing perfectly.

The only difference that we've noticed on the overall vehicle's behaviour, is that the A/C tend to rob a little more Horsepower from the engine, than before; like if it is now around 25% more heavy to spin...

Besides that, it still is working flawlessly, blowing icy cold air without leaks.

By the way, Ester and Daphne, are women names... interesting that they're used to name compressor lubricants.

Kind Regards.

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As I mentioned I think you should be good.  If it's blowing cold and working well, that's good to hear.

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